Tag Archives: HMAT Ballarat A70

Henry James Naughton BLAKEMAN

Henry James Naughton BLAKEMAN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4442), Henry James Naughton Blakeman was born at York, Western Australia. He gave his age as 21 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as plumber. (However his Certificate of Discharge in his service record states he was only 17 years of age when he enlisted, and his birth was registered in Western Australia in 1898).[1] His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 122 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had had 6 months previous military service with the Cadets and served 3 years with the 41st Infantry.

He was attested at Lithgow by Captain Eade on 2nd November 1915, when the Coo-ees were at Lithgow, and completed his medical on 3rd November 1915 at Lithgow.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Bowenfels, Cascade Street, Katoomba, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, H. N. [Henry Naughton] Blakeman, at the same address.

On 16th February 1916 Private Blakeman was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas on active service, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 Private Dawson, (along with the other Coo-ees he had travelled to Egypt with), was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post.

On 23rd May 1916 Private Blakeman was sent to a Field Ambulance suffering from Abcess. On 25th May 1916 he was transferred to No. 2 Casualty Clearing Station at Ferry Post in Egypt. On 28th May 1916 he was discharged and rejoined his unit.

On 19th June 1916 Private Blakeman left Alexandria aboard H.T. Caledonian bound for France, and arrived at Marseilles on 29th June 1916.

On the night of the 19/20th July 1916 Private Blakeman was with the 54th Battalion when it participated in the Battle of Fromelles in France. During the battle he was wounded in action, suffering a shrapnel wound to his left thigh, and was sent to a Field Ambulance.

On 21st July 1916 he was sent back to the 32nd Stationary Hospital at Wimereux, France. On 22nd July 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria at Boulogne in France for evacuation to England. The next day, on 23rd July 1916, he was admitted to the Chatham Military Hospital at Chatham, England.

On 13th October 1916 Private Blakeman was discharged from hospital and granted leave to report to the Number 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England on 28th October 1916.

On 1st November 1916 he was transferred to the 14th Training Battalion at Wareham, England.

On 12th November 1916 Private Blakeman departed Folkestone, England aboard the Transport Princess Clementine bound for France. He marched out to rejoin the 54th Battalion on 15th November 1916 when it was training at Rainneville in France.[2]

On 1st February 1917 Private Blakeman was sent to the 15th Australian Field Ambulance suffering Trench Feet.

On 11th February 1917 he was moved back to a Casualty Clearing Station with Septic Feet. On 12th February 1917 he was placed aboard the 15th Ambulance Train and transferred to the 12th General Hospital at Rouen in France, where he was admitted on 13th February 1917.

On 3rd March 1917 he was transferred to the 2nd Convalescent Depot.

He was discharged on 13th March 1917, and marched into the 5th Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 17th March 1917 Private Blakeman departed the 5th Division Base Depot and re-joined the 54th Battalion on 18th March 1917, which was in the vicinity of Beaulencourt in France.[3]

On 19th April 1917 Private Blakeman was sent to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Enteritis. On 20th April 1917 he was moved back to a Casualty Clearing Station, then to the 5th Division Rest Station.

He was discharged on 11th May 1917 and rejoined the 54th Battalion on 12th May 1917, when it was at Noreuil in France, preparing to move into the front line at the Hindenburg Line in the vicinity of Reincourt, France.[4]

On 9th July 1917 Private Blakeman was detached to the 14th Machine Gun Company.

On 28th August 1917 he was transferred from the 54th Battalion to the 14th Machine Gun Company, which later became part of the 5th Machine Gun Battalion.

On 3rd February 1918 Private Blakeman went on leave to England. He returned to the 5th Machine Gun Battalion on 20th February 1918.

After the Armistice, on 19th November 1918 Private Blakeman went on leave to England.

He returned to the 5th Machine Gun Battalion on 3rd December 1918.

On 22nd January 1919 Private Blakeman was detached for duty at the Corps workshops. He returned to the 5th Machine Gun Battalion on 2nd March 1919.

On 22nd March 1919 Private Blakeman marched into the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve in France.

On 1st April 1919 he departed Le Harve in France, and arrived at Weymouth in England on 2nd April 1919, and marched in to Number 2 Command Depot.

Private Blakeman departed Devonport in England on 15th May 1919 for return to Australia, aboard the H.T. Orontes. He disembarked at Sydney on 1st July 1919.

He was discharged from the AIF Termination of Period of Enlistment on 23rd August 1919.

[1] WA Birth Registration 1898, Number 5054, Henry James Naughton Blakeman / Henry Naughton Blakeman and Annie Catherine Kelly.

[2] AWM4 23/71/10 – November 1916, Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, 54th Battalion.

[3] AWM4 23/71/14 – March 1917, Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, 54th Battalion.

[4] AWM4 23/71/16 – May 1917, Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, 54th Battalion.

 

 

James Birrell DAWSON

James Birrell DAWSON

Walter Goodlet (left) and James Birrell Dawson (right), both amputees. Photograph courtesy of James Dawson's great granddaughter Jamie Stacey.

Coo-ees Walter Goodlet (left) and James Dawson (right), both amputees. Photograph courtesy of James Dawson’s great-grandson Jamie Stacey.

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4469), James Birrell Dawson was born at Joadga Creek, N.S.W. He gave his age as 19 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 3 ¾ inches tall, weight 122 lbs., with a fresh complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed that he had 12 months previous military experience with the Senior Cadets in Lithgow, and that he had been rejected by the 41st Infantry [Regiment of the Militia] for being ‘not tall enough’.

He completed his medical on 31s October 1915 at Lithgow, but was not attested until 13th November 1915 at Liverpool (by Lieutenant Edward Shaw). His ‘joined on’ date was 2nd November 1915.

The Lithgow Mercury reported that ‘He was formerly employed as a wheeler at the Oakey Park colliery’, and that he ‘enlisted with the “Coo-ees” and marched to Sydney with this body of men’.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

A farewell party was held for Private Dawson at Oakey Park in early January 1916 before his departure overseas, where he was presented with a fountain pen, military hairbrush, and comb, and ‘dancing and singing were indulged in until the small hours’.[2]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Oakey Park, Lithgow, N.S.W, and his next of kin is listed as his father, G. [George] Dawson, at the same address.

On 16th February 1916 Private Dawson was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas on active service, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 Private Dawson, (along with the other Coo-ees he had travelled to Egypt with), was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post.

On 19th June 1916 Private Dawson left Alexandria aboard H.T. Caledonian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 29th June 1916.

On the night of the 19/20th July 1916 Private Dawson was with the 54th Battalion when it participated in the Battle of Fromelles. During the battle he was wounded in action, suffering a gun shot wound to his right forearm.

He was treated by the 15th Australian Field Ambulance, then moved back to the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station. On 21st July 1916 he was placed aboard an Ambulance Train, and moved back to the 30th General Hospital at Calais, France. His right arm was amputated due to his wounds.

On 3rd August 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Newhaven for evacuation to England. Later that day he was admitted to the Huddersfield War Hospital.

On 8th September he was taken on strength by No. 2 Command Depot, Weymouth, England.

A letter that Private Dawson wrote home to his mother during his time convalescencing at Weymouth in England was published in the Lithgow Mercury:

‘Private James Dawson, Lithgow, writing to his mother from Monte Video camp, Weymouth, Dorset, under date September 11 [1916], said he was quite well. His arm (which was amputated) was about healed up and did not trouble him at all then. He had been in England since August 3. He was in Huddersfield Hospital until September 8, when he was removed to the first-named address. While he was a Huddersfield he had an enjoyable time. He was only there three days before he was out to three garden parties in succession, and had a “great time.” They were the first Australians to go there and the people could not do enough for them. He always had plenty of places to go to for tea. All the picture shows and theatres were free to them, and even the young ladies used to take the chaps home to tea with them, and it was a great place. But it was very quiet at Weymouth after having been at Huddersfield’. [3]

On 20th September 1916 he was transferred to the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Southall, England, which specialised in fitting artificial limbs.

On 21st December 1916 Private Dawson was discharged from hospital, and granted furlough, to report back to the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital on 5th January 1917.

During his stay at the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital he wrote the following letter home to his mother, which was published in the Lithgow Mercury:

‘Pte. James Dawson, writing from the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital, Southall, England, to his mother, Mrs G. Dawson, Oakey Park, under date February 9 [1917], says:–“I am getting on splendidly. I have had another operation since I last wrote, making three in all. But I think it will be the last, as I have been measured for the artificial arm and will be getting it in two or three weeks. I am having a very good time here – always going out to tea or theatre parties, etc. In fact, the people can’t do enough for us. We are getting well looked after in hospital, but I am getting sick of hospital life. It has been nothing else but snow these last few weeks. No sun ever shines; it is only wind and snow. I don’t think they have any summer at all. I received the other day four letters addressed to Egypt. They chased me all round the country. They were very dirty and torn when I got them; otherwise they were all right. I have only had one parcel but no papers. I don’t know where those sent got to.[4]

On 5th April 1917 Private Dawson was discharged from the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital to commence his return to Australia.

Private Dawson departed Devonport, England on 4th May 1917, aboard the Transport Themistocles. Also travelling with him on the same ship was his friend and fellow Coo-ee Walter Goodlet, who had also lost an arm.

They disembarked at Sydney on 5th July 1917.

Private Dawson was discharged medically unfit, with a disability of an amputated right arm, on 12th December 1917.

[1] ‘Wounded in France’, Lithgow Mercury, 2 August 1916, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218730143

[2] ‘Presentation to Pte. Jas. Dawson’, Lithgow Mercury, 10 January 1916, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218732433

[3] ‘Our Soldiers’ Letter Box’, Lithgow Mercury, 8 November 1916 p. 1, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218724555

[4] ‘Our Soldiers’ Letter Box. Private James Dawson’, Lithgow Mercury, 27 April 1917, p. 7, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218761454

 

TIMELINE March 1916

Tuesday, 7th March 1916

The bulk of the Coo-ees undertook their final parade and inspection in Sydney as 15th Reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. To read further click here: Final Parade and Inspection

The State Commandant inspecting the "Coo-ees" in Sydney (Sydney Mail 15/3/1916)

The State Commandant inspecting the “Coo-ees” in Sydney (Sydney Mail 15/3/1916)

Wednesday, 8th March 1916

About 119 Coo-ees embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and made up just over half of the 15th Reinforcements for the 13th Battalion on this troopship.  These included: Harold BAXTER, Sidney BENNETT, James Gerald CAMERON, Allan COLQUHOUNBernard COYTEJames CRAWFORDHarold Brooks DAVIS, Alan John Burnett EASTERBROOK, William FARTHINGMaurice Bertram FREE, Walter James GOODLET, Denis Roy GREEN, Leslie Webster GREENLEAF, Charles Alfred HAMPSON, Lightfoot Lamonby HAMPSON, Oliver James HARMON, William John Luther HOWARD, Charles Henry HUNT, Jack Henry HUNT, William Laurence HUNT, William Emerton HUNTER, Thomas JACKSON, Alan Chesher JOHNSON (Alan Cheshyre JANION), Darcy KEATING, Alfred Rupert Clyde LINGSTROM, Samuel LUKE, Laurence Leslie MAGUIRE, James MAHER, Charles Edmond MARCHANT, Ernest Charles Norman MAY, Wilfred Ernest MCDONALD, Edward Joseph MCGARRY, Andrew James MCGREGOR, Joseph Raymond McGUIRE, James MCKEOWN, Jack MORRIS, Karl Alex Frederick NIELSON, Joseph PARRISH, John QUINN, Victor QUINTON, Arthur Charles REID, William Hilton SAUNDERS, John Thomas SMITH, Ernest Stephen TAYLOUR, John William THOMPSON, Thomas THORNE, David James WAGNER, William WEBBER, and Rowland John WILSON

AWM_H17014_HMAT_A15_Star_of_England

Photograph of HMAT A15 Star of England. Part of the Australian War Memorial collection. H17104.

Saturday, 11th March 1916

Joe BILLING and three other Coo-ees embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A67 Orsova.

Tuesday 21st March 1916

Charles Arthur FINN and Percy Walter HOLPEN and Clement Patrick KANE and Henry MOSS and  John Herbert WATTS and another Coo-ee embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A26 Armadale.

Wednesday, 22nd March 1916

The Coo-ees on the HMAT A70 Ballarat arrived in Egypt.

Leslie SULLIVAN and four other Coo-ees (all Light Horse) embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A4 Pera.

Friday, 31st March 1916

William Henry GRIFFITHS and two other Coo-ees embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A16 Star of Victoria.

 

TIMELINE February 1916

Wednesday, 16th February 1916

The first group of Coo-ees embarked from Sydney for overseas active service, on the HMAT Ballarat A70.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

These included: Joseph ARMSTRONG, Percy George BROWN, Charles William Gordon CONROYEdwin Joseph FULLER, John MARTIN, Donald Singleton STEWART, John TARLINGTON,  John William THOMPSON,  William Charles WALKER, Joseph Patrick WALLIS, and Colin David WREN.

It was reported in the Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate that Percy George Brown had written “The first batch of the Gilgandra “Coo-ees” to leave for the front will sail at the end of the present week. About 15 men, including four who enlisted at Dubbo, have been transferred into an earlier reinforcement of the same battalion, which the rest of the “Coo-ees” are in”.[1]

[1] ‘Our Soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 4 February 1916, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77604424

Colin David WREN

Colin David WREN

Colin David Wren. Photograph courtesy of P. Kahler.

Colin David Wren. Photograph courtesy of P. Kahler.

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4623), Colin David Wren was born at Calcutta, India. He gave his age as 40 years and 5 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 142 lbs., with a medium complexion, green eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had six years previous military experience in India. He completed his medical on 19th October 1915 at Lithgow, and was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway at Lithgow on 2nd November 1915 (when the Coo-ees were in Lithgow).

He was reported as having joined the Coo-ees in the Cowra Free Press.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Private Wren was given a send-off at Tallarook woolshed [near Broula] in January 1916, where he was presented with a gold wristlet watch, and he ‘in responding, made a vigorous appeal to the manhood of Broula to enlist, and was successful in securing five recruits’.[2]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Grenfield [i.e. Grenfell] Road, Broula, via Cowra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs. M. [Margaret] Wren, at the same address.

On 16th February 1916 Private Wren was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas on active service, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 Private Wren, (along with the other Coo-ees he had travelled to Egypt with), was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post.

On 12th April 1916 Private Wren was transferred to the 1st Australian Stationary Hospital at Ismailia, Egypt, with Stricture. On 27th April 1916 he was transferred to the British Red Cross Convalescent Home in Montazah. On 8th May 1916 he was discharged for duty to Tel-el-Kebir.

On 25th May 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On 5th June 1916 he proceeded to join the British Expeditionary Force in France from Alexandria aboard the Transport Ionian. He disembarked at Marseilles on 15th June 1916.

On 25th October 1916, he was detached for duty at the 1st Anzac Headquarters, from the 4th Australian Divisional Base Depot.

On 8th January 1917 he was taken on strength of the 4th Pioneer Battalion in the field.

Three months later he was admitted to the 1st Field Ambulance sick, on 4th April 1917. He was transferred to the 10th General Hospital in Rouen on 9th April 1917. On 1st May 1917 he was transferred to England on the Hospital Ship Western Australia. He was admitted to the 2nd Southern General Hospital in Bristol with old stricture, on 2nd May 1917.

During the time he was convalescing in hospital in Bristol , Private Wren wrote in a letter dated 16th June 1916, that was reported on in the Cowra Free Press, of ‘his praise of the people of that town in regard to their treatment of wounded Australians’, and he described being taken for a drive around the city by the local people, and he said ‘he and hundreds of other wounded Australians thanked God for the hospitable and kind way in which they had been treated by the people of England’.[3]

On 27th July 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Auxiliary Hospital from the 2nd Southern General Hospital, with Cystitis.

On 30th July 1917 Private Wren was discharged from hospital, and granted two weeks leave until 13th August 1917, when he reported to No. C. Depot in Weymouth, England.

On 27th September 1917 Private Wren left England for return to Australia on the transport Suevic.

On 3rd January 1918 he was discharged at Sydney as medically unfit.

[1] Another “Cooee!”, Cowra Free Press, 13 November 1915, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99695508

[2] A Soldier Farewelled’, Cowra Free Press, 22 January 1916, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99696556

[3] ‘Soldier’s letters’, Cowra Free Press, 8 September 1917, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99711897

 

 

 

John William THOMPSON

John William THOMPSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4609), John William Thompson was born at Camperdown, Sydney, N.S.W. He gave his age as 25 years and 4 months, his marital status as single and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 2 5/8 inches tall, weight 8 stone 11 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military experience. He completed his medical on the 24th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested at Orange by Captain Nicholas on the 24th October 1915.

He was named as one of the recruits who joined the Coo-ees at Orange in the Leader.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 4 Raglan Street, Darlington, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, J. W. Thompson, Botany, Sydney, N.S.W..

On 16th February 1916 Private Thompson was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

During the voyage, Private Thompson (along with several other Coo-ees on the ship) was charged with being absent without leave from on 8th March 1916 whilst at Colombo, Ceylon. He was fined 1 pound.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 John William Thompson was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post.

On 3rd April 1916 Private Thompson was sent to the 15th Australian Field Ambulance sick. He was moved back to the 2nd Casualty Clearing Station later that day. He was placed aboard the 4th Hospital Train and moved to the 1st Australian Stationary Hospital at Ismalia in Egypt. He was transferred to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Abbassia in Egypt on 4th April 1916. He was discharged from hospital for duty on 6th June 1916.

On 6th August 1916 Private Thompson left Alexandria bound for England. He arrived later that month.

On 31st August 1916 Private Thompson was sent to the Fargo Military Hospital ill with an unstated condition. He was discharged and marched into the 4th Training Battalion at Rollerstone in England on 5th September 1916.

On 2nd November 1916 Private Thompson departed Folkestone, England, aboard the Transport Golden Eagle bound for France. He then marched into the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France the next day. He was taken on strength of the 54th Battalion on 22nd November 1916.

On 8th May 1917 Private Thompson was sent to the 5th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from the effects of an inoculation. He was moved back to the 5th Division Rest Station and rejoined the Battalion on 12th May 1917.

On 1st June 1917 Private Thompson was sent to the 6th Field Ambulance ill with “soft sore”. He was moved back to the 5th Division Rest Station later that day. On 6th June 1917 he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital. He was discharged on 22nd June 1917 and sent to the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 26th August 1917.

On 2nd October 1917 Private Thompson went on leave to England. Whilst in England he was charged with being absent without leave from 8th October 1917 till 15th October 1917. He was fined 22 days pay.

Private Thompson returned from leave and rejoined his unit on 26th October 1917.

On 30th November 1917 Private Thompson was charged with being absent without leave from 11th November 1917 till 25th November 1917. He was awarded 28 days field punishment number 2.

On 5th January 1918 Private Thompson was charged with being absent without leave from 0900 on 3rd January 1917 till 2150 on 3rd January 1918. He was awarded 7 days field punishment number 2.

On 11th January 1918 Private Thompson was sent to the 14th Field Ambulance sick and he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital. He was discharged on 26th January 1918 and sent to the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He rejoined the Battalion on 20th February 1918.

On 11th April 1918 Private Thompson was wounded in action, receiving a shrapnel wound to his left hand. He was sent to a Field Ambulance then moved back to a casualty clearing station, then on 12th April 1918 he was admitted to the 12th General Hospital at Rouen, France. He was discharged on 13th April 1918 and sent to the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 10th June 1918.

On 25th June 1918 Private Thompson was sent to the 5th Army School of Cookery. On 11th July 1918 he was sent to the Australian Division Base Depot, then on 31st July 1918 he rejoined his unit.

On 21st August 1918 he was received by Assistant Provost Marshal Havre from Paris. On 23rd August 1918 he was placed in custody pending disposal. On 26th August 1918 Private Thompson was charged with being absent without leave from the 0730 on 18th August 1918 till 2240 on 20th August 1918. He was awarded 14 days field punishment number 2.

On 29th September 1918 Private Thompson was wounded in action for the second time, receiving a gunshot wound to his left hand. He was sent to a Field Ambulance then moved back to the 30th Casualty Clearing Station. On 1st October 1918 he was admitted to the 4th General Hospital.

On 12th October 1918 he was placed aboard a Hospital Ship for evacuation to England. He was admitted to the Ontario Military Hospital at Orplington, England later that day.

Whilst in hospital Private Thompson was charged with being absent without leave from 2100 on 21st October 1918 till 1900 on 22nd October 1918. He was fined 1 days pay.

He was discharged from hospital on 29th October 1918 and granted leave to report to the Number 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott in England on 12th November 1918.

On 16th November 1918 Private Thompson was charged with being absent without leave from 1030 on 13th November 1918 till 1000 on 16th November 1918. He was fined 3 days pay.

On 18th November he marched into No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott from Army Headquarters in London ex furlough.

On 2nd December 1918 Private Thompson marched into the Australian Army Medical Corps Training Depot.

Private Thompson departed England on 5th January 1919 for return to Australia aboard the Transport Kanowna. He disembarked in Sydney on 14th March 1919. He was discharged at Sydney medically unfit with amputated forefinger left hand, gunshot wound, on 5th May 1919.

[1] ‘The Recruits’, Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

William Charles WALKER

William Charles WALKER

Per his initial military service record (4616), William Charles Walker was born at Norfolk, England. He gave his age as 22 years and 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 6 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 4 lbs, with a medium fair complexion, brown eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He had a tattoo mark of clasped hands and English and American flags on his right forearm. He completed his medical at Molong on 22nd October 1915, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Molong (8 miles east) on 22nd October 1915. He claimed to have no previous military experience.

It was reported in The Western Champion that the Parkes Recruiting Association had held a recruiting meeting ‘for the purpose of enrolling recruits who were willing to join the volunteers now on the way, by road, from Gilgandra to Sydney’, and that ‘five men had mounted the lorry in response to the appeal’, and that ‘one of them went on to Dubbo’, with the remaining four planning to proceed to Molong to join the contingent.[1] William Charles Walker was one of the four recruits sent by the Parkes Recruiting Association to join the Coo-ees at Molong.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wayvilla, Melford Street, Hurlstone Park, Sydney, N,S,W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, M. Walker, 6th St. Clement Street, Barnsbury, London, England.

On 16th February 1916 Private Walker was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916. On 1st April 1916 Private Walker was transferred to the 54th Battalion.

On 19th June 1916 Private Walker left Alexandria aboard H.T. Caledonian bound for France, and arrived at Marseilles on 29th June 1916.

Just three weeks later, on 19th/20th July 1916 Private Walker was wounded in action during the Battle of Fromelles, receiving a gunshot wound to his right arm. On 22nd July 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria at Boulogne, bound for England. On 23rd July 1916 he was admitted to the Southwark Military Hospital at East Dulwich, England.

He was discharged from hospital on 18th September 1916 and marched into the 14th Training Battalion.

His service record holds a certified extract of a marriage certificate for William Charles Walker and Jessie Elizabeth Browning at the Parish of St. James Church, Islington, dated 16th December 1916.

On 22nd February 1917 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from Tattoo on 2nd February 1917 till 0850 on 18th February 1917. He was awarded 17 days detention and fined 31 days pay.

On 16th March 1917 Private Walker was admitted to the Wareham Isolation Hospital suffering from Mumps. He was discharged and sent to the Number 4 Command Depot on 4th April 1917.

On 28th April 1917 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from Tattoo from 18th April 1917 until 22rd April 1917. He was awarded 6 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 16 days pay.

On 10th May 1917 Private Walker was transferred to the 61st Battalion.

On 6th July 1917 Private Walker went before a District Court Martial at Hurdcott charged with being absent without leave from Tattoo from 12th May 1917 till apprehended by the Military Police at 2030 on 12th June 1917. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 60 days detention and fined 115 days pay. He was sent to the Wadsworth detention barracks to undergo his sentence. He was released from Wadsworth Detention Barracks on 27th August 1917 and marched into the 61st Battalion.

On 13th September 1917 Private Walker departed Southampton bound for France, to reinforce the 54th Battalion. He marched into his unit in the 54th Battalion in France on 2nd October 1917.

On 30th January 1918 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from 9 pm on 21st November 1917 till apprehended by the Military Police at 11 am on 11th December 1917. He was awarded 24 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 45 days pay.

A letter in his service record from his mother dated 15th October 1919 advised that his father, Matthew Walker, was killed in an air raid in London on 28th January 1918.

On 5th February 1918 Private Walker proceeded to the UK on leave. On 20th February 1918 he was granted an extension of leave from 20th to 27th February 1918.

On 4th April 1918 Private Walker went before a District Court Martial held at 58 Warwick Square, London, charged with being absent without leave in that he failed to report to the RTO at Victoria Station at 7.30am on 27th February 1918 until he surrendered himself to the civil police on 24th March 1918. He was fined 37 days pay.

On 23rd April 1918 Private Walker went before another District Court Martial held at Warwick Square charged with deserting His Majesty’s Service on 7th April 1918 by failing to proceed overseas to join his unit in France as it was his duty to do and remained absent without leave till apprehended by the Civil Police in London on 15th April 1918. He pleaded not guilty and was found guilty. He was sentenced to 6 months detention and fined 199 days pay.

On 24th April 1918 Private Walker marched into the Lewes Detention barracks to undergo his sentence.

On 15th August 1918 he was discharged from detention with the remainder of his sentence suspended, to march into Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

His service record shows that he was reported absent without leave again a week later.

On 12th November 1918 Private Walker went before a District Court Martial charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 22nd August 1918 till 0730 on 3rd October 1918 (when he returned), then being absent without leave from 0900 on 12th October 1918 till 0930 on 2nd November 1918. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 120 days detention.

On 27th November 1918 Private Walker marched into the Lewes Detention barracks to undergo his sentence. On 13th February 1919 he was released from detention with the remainder of his sentence suspended, to the 54th Battalion.

On 6th March 1919 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from 1400 on 17th February 1919 till 1700 on 28th February 1919. The matter was dismissed.

On 15th March 1919 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from 0900 on 11th March 1919 till 1200 on 14th March 1919. He was awarded 5 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 9 days pay.

On 19th April 1919 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from 13th April 1919 to 17th April 1919. The case was dismissed.

On 17th July 1919 Private Walker was admitted to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England. He was discharged on 21st July 1919.

On 24th August 1919 Private Walker was “granted indefinite leave awaiting, awaiting a family ship”.

Private Walker applied for discharge in the U.K., his reason stated in his Application for a Discharge in a Country other than Australia, dated 8th September 1919, as: “My wife now being pregnant I think it wise for me to stay in England. My mother also getting on in years and her being a widow, I think it my duty to try and comfort her, but if returned to Australia, it would cause inconvenience on both sides. I can obtain employment, my relations are holding business in London. I must note the fact that my father was killed in an Air Raid over London on 28.1.18”.

This application was approved, and he was discharged in London on 18th December 1919.

[1] ‘Marching to Sydney’, Western Champion, 21 October 1915, p. 19, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112309615

 

 

Edwin Joseph FULLER

Edwin Joseph FULLER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4493), Edwin Joseph Fuller was born at Norwood, England. He gave his age as 21 years and 6 months, his marital status as single and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 3 7/8 inches tall, weight 9 stone 10 lbs., with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military experience. He completed his medical on the 23rd October 1915 at Orange, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Orange on the 24th October 1915.

He was named as one of the recruits who joined the Coo-ees at Orange in the Leader.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Cresswell Hall, Easter Avenue, Kensington, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, J. E. [John Edwin] Fuller, 6 Southdown Road, Stanley Road, Wallington, Surrey, England. (He had listed his posted address as “Orange” on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Orange).

On 16th February 1916 Private Fuller was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

During the voyage, Private Fuller was charged with being absent without leave from 0500 till 1900 on 8th March 1916 whilst at Colombo, Ceylon. He was fined 1 day’s pay.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916. On 1st April 1916 Private Fuller was transferred to the 54th Battalion.

On 19th June 1916 Private Fuller left Alexandria aboard H.T. Caledonian bound for France. On 26th June 1916 whilst at sea he was charged with Slackness at Sentry Post. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment Number 2. The HT Caledonian arrived at Marseilles on 29th June 1916.

On the 19th/20th July 1916 Private Fuller participated in the Battle of Fromelles. He survived the battle unscathed, however on 31st July 1916 he was sent to the 14th Field Ambulance suffering shell shock. On 2nd August he was moved back to a Casualty Clearing Station. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 16th August 1916.

On 25th November 1916 Private Fuller was sent to the 14th Field Ambulance ill with Influenza. On 26th November 1916 he was moved back to the 38th Casualty Clearing Station. On 28th November 1916 he was placed aboard an Ambulance train and sent to the 5th General Hospital at Rouen, France, being admitted on 29th November 1916. On 8th December 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Carisbrook Castle at Le Harve and evacuated to England.

After he had recovered in England, on 16th January 1917 Private Fuller departed Folkestone, England, aboard the Transport Princess Clementine bound for France. On 17th January 1917 he arrived at the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 19th January 1917 Private Fuller was charged with being absent from medical parade after being duly warned for draft. He was awarded 4 days Field Punishment Number 2.

On 31st January 1917 Private Fuller was charged with being in Etaples without a pass. He was awarded 8 days Field Punishment Number 2.

On 8th February 1917 Private Fuller rejoined the 54th Battalion when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Longueval, France.

On 30th April 1917 Private Fuller was sent to the 15th Field Ambulance sick with Influenza. He was admitted to the 5th Division Rest Station later that day. On 25th June 1917 he rejoined the 54th Battalion when it was conducting training at Warloy, France.

On 16th September 1917 Private Fuller was promoted to Lance Corporal.

On 20th September 1917 Lance Corporal Fuller went on leave to England. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 4th October 1917.

Three weeks later on 23rd October 1917 Lance Corporal Fuller was wounded in action, being gassed. He was sent to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance. On 24th October 1917 he was moved back to the 5th Division Rest Station. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 7th November 1917.

On 25th February 1918 Lance Corporal Fuller went to Paris on leave. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 9th March 1918.

On 19th March 1918 Lance Corporal Fuller was sent to the 14th Field Ambulance suffering Scabies. He was sent to the 5th Australian Division Rest Station later that day, He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 23rd March 1918.

On 25th September 1918 Lance Corporal Fuller went on leave to England.

He returned from leave on 11th October 1918 and was transferred to the 56th Battalion.

On 9th April 1919 Lance Corporal Fuller marched into the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve, France, to commence his return to Australia. He departed France on 16th April 1919. He arrived at Weymouth, England on 17th April 1919 and marched into the Number 5 Group.

Lance Corporal Fuller departed Devonport, England, on 2nd June 1919 for return to Australia, aboard the H.T. Beltana. He arrived in Australia on 19th July 1919. He was discharged Termination of Enlistment on 12th September 1919.

[1] ‘The Recruits’, Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

 

 

Percy George BROWN

Percy George BROWN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4446), Percy George Brown was born on 27th July 1894 at Westham, England. He gave his age as 21 years and 3 months, his marital status as single and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 148 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had 18 months previous military service in the 1st C. B. Kings Royal Rifles. He completed his medical on the 16th October 1915 at Wellington, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Dripstone on the 19th October 1915.

Percy George Brown was named as being one of the Wongarbon recruits in the Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was not listed, and his next of kin is listed as his father, C. H. [Charles Henry] Brown, 81 Corporation Street, West Ham, London, England. (The address he gave on his Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Dubbo was ‘Box 5, Cunnamulla Qld).’

Just before Private Brown embarked, it was reported in the Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate that he had written “The first batch of the Gilgandra “Coo-ees” to leave for the front will sail at the end of the present week. About 15 men, including four who enlisted at Dubbo, have been transferred into an earlier reinforcement of the same battalion, which the rest of the “Coo-ees” are in”.[2]

On 16th February 1916 Private Brown was one of this first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion, which arrived in Egypt on the 22nd March 1916.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

On the 1st April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post.

On 3rd April 1916 he was admitted to the 1st Field Ambulance, then moved to the 2nd Casualty Clearance Station at Ismailia with defective vision. On 4th April 1916 he was admitted to the 1st Australian Stationary Hospital with Myopia. On 9th April 1916 he returned to his unit.

On 2nd June 1916 he was admitted to the 1st Australian Stationary Hospital with defective vision. On 8th June he was transferred to the Training Battalion at Alexandria.

On 6th August 1916 Private Brown left Alexandria aboard His Majesty’s Transport Megantic, bound for England. On 1st December 1916 he marched into the 4th Training Battalion at Codford.

On 31st December 1916 he departed Folkestone aboard the transport Princess Henrietta for France. He marched into the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples on 1st January 1917.

On 6th February 1917 Private Brown marched out of the Base Depot and on 8th February 1917. He was taken on strength of the 54th Battalion when it was manning the front line near Longueval France. On 24th February 1917 he was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance for eye treatment. He rejoined his Battalion on 25th February 1917.

On 4th April 1917 Private Brown was sent to hospital sick. On 20th April 1917 he was admitted to the 11th Stationary Hospital at Rouen with Influenza. On 24th April 1917 he was sent to the 2nd Convalescent Depot. On 1st May 1917 he was transferred to the 11th Convalescent Depot. On 29th July 1917 he was transferred to the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 18th August 1917 when it was refitting and training at Renescure, France.

On 18th October 1917 Private Brown was admitted to the 8th Field Ambulance with debility. He was sent to the 5th Division Rest Station that same day. On the 30th of October 1917 he was sent to the 50th Casualty Clearing Station. On the 4th of November 1917 he was transferred to the 6th General Hospital at Rouen with Bronchitis. On the 8th of November 1917 he was transferred to the 2nd Convalescent Depot, then on 11th November 1917 he was sent to the 11th Convalescent Depot. On 30th January 1918 he marched into the 5th Division Base Depot at Le Harve. On 20th February 1918 he returned to the 54th Battalion when it was in the front line near Wijtschate, Belgium.

On 26th February 1918 Private Brown went on leave to the United Kingdom. He returned to the Battalion on 15th March 1918 when it was in reserve near Dranoutre, Belgium.

On 24th April 1918 Private Brown was with the 54th Battalion when it defending the vicinity of Villers Bretonneux, France. The Germans launched an attack on the Battalion which included the use of gas shells. The attack was repulsed with heavy casualties suffered by the Germans. The 54th Battalion suffered 3 men killed, 10 wounded, and 28 gassed. Private Brown was amongst those gassed. He was evacuated to the 14th Australian Field Ambulance then moved to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station. On 25th April he was sent to the 10th General Hospital at Rouen, then on 28th April to the 73rd General Hospital at Trouville, France. On 13th June 1918 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Convalescent Depot at Le Harve. On 3rd August 1918 he marched into the 5th Australian Division Base Depot.

On 13th August 1918 he rejoined the 54th Battalion when it was at Fuilloy, France, preparing to move back into the line.

On 27th September 1918 Private Brown was admitted to the 14th Australian Field Ambulance sick. On 28th September 1918 he was moved back to the 20th Casualty Clearing Station. On 29th September 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Stationary Hospital at Rouen. On 30th September 1918 he was transferred to the 2nd Convalescent Depot. On 1st October 1918 he was moved to the 6th General Hospital. On 4th October 1918 he was evacuated to England, arriving at the 2nd Western General Hospital in Manchester on 5th October 1918. On 13th November 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford. On 25th November 1918 he moved to the 2nd Convalescent Depot at Weymouth.

On 9th December 1918 Private Brown departed England for return to Australia aboard HT Argyllshire.

He arrived in Australia on 14th February 1919, and was discharged on 10th October 1919.

Private Brown’s return to Australia was reported as follows in The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate: “Recently returned from the front, after three years of active service, Private P. G. Brown. He joined up with “The Coo-ees” at Wongarbon early in October, 1915. He has seen service in Egypt and France, and was wounded and gassed. His many friends in Wongarbon and district will be pleased to hear of his safe return”.[3]

[1] ‘Our Soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 29 October 1915, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601711

[2] ‘Our Soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 4 February 1916, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77604424

[3] ‘Personal Notes’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 7 March 1919, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75636042

 

 

 

 

 

John TARLINGTON

John TARLINGTON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4605), John Tarlington was born at Glen Innes, N.S.W. He gave his age as 38 years and 7 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 11 stone 5 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.

On his attestation paper dated 26th October 1915, John Tarlington claimed previous service of 10 months in South Africa during the Boer War with the New South Wales Mounted Infantry, and 2 months previous service with the 18th Battalion.

John Tarlington had enlisted previously in the AIF on 20th May 1915 (with regimental no. 727) and completed two months training before being discharged at his wife’s request on 8th July 1915. Noted on this previous attestation paper dated 20th May 1915 was that at he had ‘Served 13th Battalion Discharged for breaking leave’. According to a statement in his service record that John Tarlington had made at the time of his 20th May 1915 enlistment, as he was unable to produce a discharge certificate for his previous service, he had enlisted about the ‘middle of November 1914 and was pooled’ to the 13th Battalion, from which he had been ‘discharged the day before embarkation on a charge of “Overstaying leave”’. He was ‘granted 24 hours leave, & returned to camp about 24 hours late, owing to severe illness’ of his wife, and on his return he was told his ‘place had been filled’ on account of his absence , and he was ‘then ordered off the ground by one of the Military Police’.

John Tarlington was in the process of applying to re-enlist in the AIF for the third time before he joined up with the Coo-ees at Blayney. On his initial Application to enlist form in his service record dated 11th October 1915 at Lithgow, John Tarlington gave his address as Coombing Park, Carcoar, N.S.W.  A letter in his service record stated that he would present himself on the 26th October after he had given two week’s notice to his employer. It appears he presented himself to the Coo-ee March at Blayney on the 26th October, instead of returning to Lithgow to enlist.

He completed his medical examination on the 26th October 1915 at Blayney, and was attested by Captain Eade at Blayney on 26th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Guildford Road, Guildford, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs. S. [Susan] Tarlington, Guildford Road, Guildford , N.S.W.

Private Tarlington departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat on 16th February 1916. He arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916. On 1st April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post, Egypt.

On 14th April 1916 Private Tarlington reported to the 14th Field ambulance sick, and he was sent to the 2nd Casualty Clearing Station, then to the Number 1 Australian Stationary Hospital at Ismalia, Egypt. The next day 15th April 1916 Private Tarlington was admitted to the 1st Dermatological Hospital at Abassia, Egypt. He was discharged on 21st April 1916.

On 23rd May 1916 Private Tarilington was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

Private Tarlington left Alexandria on 6th June 1916 aboard the Transport Ionian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 15th June 1916. He went to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France. On 21st June 1916 he departed Etaples and joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion the next day on 22nd June 1916 when it was at Armentieres, France constructing defensive works.

On 6th August 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was maintaining Tramway Trench in the ruins of the village of Pozieres which was under heavy German artillery fire during the Battle of Pozieres when Private Tarlington was killed in action. Also killed with him in the 4th Pioneer Battalion on the same day were fellow Coo-ees Oliver James Harmon (who joined the Coo-ees at Parramatta), and Karl Alex Frederick Neilson (who joined the Coo-ees at Springwood).

According to his Red Cross Wounded and Missing report, Private Tarlington was killed by a shell as ‘he got on the top of the trench at Pozieres to allow some wounded men to pass along the trench’, and he was buried ‘afterwards just over the parapet of the trench’, and ‘the grave was not marked’.[1]

Private Tarlington has no known grave, and is remembered on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial in France. He left a widow and a son.

Private Tarlington's name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Tarlington’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Tarlington’s name is commemorated on panel 174 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Private Tarlington’s name is also remembered on the Guildford Soldiers Memorial at the Soldiers Memorial School of Arts Hall at Guildford.

[1] ‘4605 Private John Tarlington’, Red Cross Wounded and Missing Enquiry Bureau Files, 1914-1918 War 1DRL/0428, http://static.awm.gov.au/images/collection/pdf/RCDIG1059988–1-.pdf