Tag Archives: HMAT A16 Star of Victoria

Robert Michael HICKEY

Robert Michael HICKEY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5099), Robert Michael Hickey was born at Carcoar, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 43 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as engine driver.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 156 lbs., with a medium complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He was attested by Lieutenant Frank Middenway at Ashfield on 11th November 1915. The Coo-ees held a recruitment meeting and stayed in Ashfield at the Drill Hall on the night of 11th November 1915 – the last night of the march.  The Certificate of Medical Examination in his service record shows that he first completed his medical on 11th November 1915 at Ashfield, however this date is crossed out, and replaced with the later date of 28th January 1916, at Liverpool Camp.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 4th February 1916 Private Hickey was charged with being Absent Without Leave from 16th  January to 24th January 1916.  He was recommended to be discharged, however he was fined and reinstated.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 29 Rocket Street, Bathurst, N.S.W, and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs E. Hickey, at the same address.

Private Hickey departed Sydney on the HMAT A16 Star of Victoria on 31st March 1916, as 16th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.[2]  He arrived in Egypt on the 8th May 1916.

On the 7th June 1916 Private Hickey left Alexandria aboard a transport ship bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 14th June 1916.

On 21st July he was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion in France from the 4th Division Base Depot at Etaples.

On 2nd August 1916 the 13th Battalion was training at Warloy, France, when Private Hickey was charged with being absent from Tattoo roll call on 31st July 1916. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 11th August 1916, Private Hickey was wounded in action in the vicinity of Pozieres, when the 13th Battalion was in the front line during the Battle of Pozieres.  (His wound is not described in his service record).  He was evacuated to the 1st Canadian General Hospital at Etaples, France, where he was admitted sick on 23rd August 1916.

On 30th August 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Stad Antwerpen at Calais for evacuation to England. Later that day he was admitted to the 4th Northern General Hospital at Lincoln, England.

On 25th September 1916 Private Hickey was transferred to the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Southall, England. He was discharged on 31st October 1916 and marched into the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 9th November 1916 Private Hickey was transferred to the 4th Training Battalion at Codford, England for “home service”.

On13th April 1917 Private Hickey was transferred back to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 4th May 1917 Private Hickey departed England from Devonport aboard the H.M.A.T. Runic bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 6th July 1917.  He was discharged Medically Unfit (Mitral Incompetence) on 11th August 1917.

Note: A page in his service record lists that he embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England with regimental no. 4798.  However, his name (and this regimental number) are not included on the nominal roll for the HMAT A15 Star of England. This initial regimental no. 4798 is crossed out on his Attestation Paper, and replaced with 5099.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, HICKEY R M 5099

[2] Australian War Memorial First World War Embarkation Rolls, ‘Robert Michael Hickey’, HMAT Star of Victoria A16, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1830731/

William Allan Luther PHILPOTT

William Allan Luther  PHILPOT / PHILPOTT

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5164), William Allan Luther Philpot was born at Ashfield, N.S.W. (He signed his name as W. A. L. Philpott). He gave his age as 19 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as carter. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 120 lbs., with a fresh complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Congregational. He claimed that he had no previous military service, and that he had been rejected for the AIF in the past.

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway, at Ashfield on 11th November 1915, where the Coo-ees held a recruitment meeting, and stayed in the Drill Hall that evening.

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 4th January 1916 Private Philpot was transferred from B Company to D Company in the 13th Battalion.

On 3rd February 1916 Private Philpot was charged with being absent from parade without leave. He was fined 1 days pay.

On 2nd March 1916 he was again charged with being absent without leave, and fined 1 days pay.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Morwin Street, Canberbury, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his mother, Mrs M. A. Philpot, at the same address.

Private Philpot (along with fellow Coo-ees Private William Griffiths and Robert Hickey) departed Sydney on the HMAT A16 Star of Victoria A16 on 31st March 1916, as 16th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. They arrived in Egypt on 8th May 1916.

After further training with the 4th Training Battalion, Private Philpot was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion at Serapeum on 28th May 1916.

On 1st June 1916 Private Philpot left Alexandria aboard the Transport Transylvania bound for France, and arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

On 1st July 1916 the 13th Battalion was manning the front line at White City post in the vicinity of Bois-Grenier in France. Private Philpot was wounded in action during a German bombardment, and was evacuated suffering shell shock.

He was moved back to the 14th General Hospital, being admitted on 13th July 1916. On 14th July 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship St Dennis at Boulogne, for evacuation to England.

He was admitted to the Northumberland War Hospital at Gosforth in England on 15th July 1916.

On 31st July 1916 he was transferred to the Woodcote Park Convalescent Hospital at Epsom in England.

On 10th September 1916 he was discharged and sent to the Number 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England.

On 14th September 1916 Private Philpot was granted leave to report back to the Depot at Pernham Downs on 6th October 1916.

On 31st October 1916 Private Philpot was admitted to the Dehli Hospital at Pernham Downs suffering from Influenza.

On 29th November 1916 he was transferred to the Red Cross Hospital at Hungerford in England. He was discharged and sent back to the Number 1 Command Depot on 4th January 1917.

On 27th January 1917 Private Philpot was admitted to Tidworth Military Hospital, suffering from an unknown illness. He was discharged and sent back to the Number 1 Command Depot on 5th March 1917.

On 14th March 1917 Private Philpot was admitted sick to Dehli Hospital at Pernham Downs, and returned to his unit the next day.

On 23rd March 1917 Private Philpot was transferred to the newly formed 61st Battalion at Wareham in England.

On 21st April 1917 he was transferred back to the 13th Battalion and Number 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England.

On 12th May 1917 Private Philpot marched into Number 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England.

On 27th May 1917 Private Philpot was transferred to the 69th Squadron of the Australian Flying Corps at South Carlton in Lincolnshire.

On 24th August 1917 3rd A.M. [Air Mechanic 3rd Class] Philpot departed England for France. He disembarked at Le Harve in France on 25th August 1917.

Soon after his arrival in France, on 28th August 1917 3rd A.M. Philpot was admitted to hospital sick. He was discharged from hospital on 20th September 1917, and joined the 69th Squadron, which had recently relocated to Savy in France.

On 17th October 1917 3rd A.M. Philpot was admitted to the 3rd Australian General Hospital at Abbeville in France, suffering from D.A.H. otitis.

On 20th October 1917 he was placed aboard the 32nd Ambulance Train, and on 21st October 1917 he was placed aboard a Hospital Ship for evacuation to England with otitis media. He was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital later that same day.

On 22nd December 1917 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 2nd January 1918 he was granted leave to report to the Number 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott in England on 16th January 1918.

On 19th February 1918 Private Philpot was transferred to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 12th March 1918 Private Philpot commenced his return to Australia, and departed England aboard the Transport Kenilworth Castle. He transferred to the H.M.A.T. Field Marshall, and departed Durban in South Africa on 23rd April 1918, and arrived in Australia on 23rd May 1918.

He was discharged Medically Unfit on 21st August 1918.

TIMELINE March 1916

Tuesday, 7th March 1916

The bulk of the Coo-ees undertook their final parade and inspection in Sydney as 15th Reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. To read further click here: Final Parade and Inspection

The State Commandant inspecting the "Coo-ees" in Sydney (Sydney Mail 15/3/1916)

The State Commandant inspecting the “Coo-ees” in Sydney (Sydney Mail 15/3/1916)

Wednesday, 8th March 1916

About 119 Coo-ees embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and made up just over half of the 15th Reinforcements for the 13th Battalion on this troopship.  These included: Harold BAXTER, Sidney BENNETT, James Gerald CAMERON, Allan COLQUHOUNBernard COYTEJames CRAWFORDHarold Brooks DAVIS, Alan John Burnett EASTERBROOK, William FARTHINGMaurice Bertram FREE, Walter James GOODLET, Denis Roy GREEN, Leslie Webster GREENLEAF, Charles Alfred HAMPSON, Lightfoot Lamonby HAMPSON, Oliver James HARMON, William John Luther HOWARD, Charles Henry HUNT, Jack Henry HUNT, William Laurence HUNT, William Emerton HUNTER, Thomas JACKSON, Alan Chesher JOHNSON (Alan Cheshyre JANION), Darcy KEATING, Alfred Rupert Clyde LINGSTROM, Samuel LUKE, Laurence Leslie MAGUIRE, James MAHER, Charles Edmond MARCHANT, Ernest Charles Norman MAY, Wilfred Ernest MCDONALD, Edward Joseph MCGARRY, Andrew James MCGREGOR, Joseph Raymond McGUIRE, James MCKEOWN, Jack MORRIS, Karl Alex Frederick NIELSON, Joseph PARRISH, John QUINN, Victor QUINTON, Arthur Charles REID, William Hilton SAUNDERS, John Thomas SMITH, Ernest Stephen TAYLOUR, John William THOMPSON, Thomas THORNE, David James WAGNER, William WEBBER, and Rowland John WILSON

AWM_H17014_HMAT_A15_Star_of_England

Photograph of HMAT A15 Star of England. Part of the Australian War Memorial collection. H17104.

Saturday, 11th March 1916

Joe BILLING and three other Coo-ees embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A67 Orsova.

Tuesday 21st March 1916

Charles Arthur FINN and Percy Walter HOLPEN and Clement Patrick KANE and Henry MOSS and  John Herbert WATTS and another Coo-ee embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A26 Armadale.

Wednesday, 22nd March 1916

The Coo-ees on the HMAT A70 Ballarat arrived in Egypt.

Leslie SULLIVAN and four other Coo-ees (all Light Horse) embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A4 Pera.

Friday, 31st March 1916

William Henry GRIFFITHS and two other Coo-ees embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A16 Star of Victoria.

 

William Henry GRIFFITHS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5089), William Henry Griffiths was born at Waterloo Flat, Victoria. He gave his age as 33 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as engine driver. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 9 stone 10 lbs., with a fair complexion, hazel eyes, and auburn (dark) hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

William Griffiths was named in an article titled ‘Blayney recruits’ in the Leader as one of six men who have joined ‘as a result of the visit of the Coo-ees to Blayney’.[1] The Coo-ees had held a recruiting meeting and stayed overnight at Blayney on 26th October 1915.

He completed his medical examination at Orange on 1st November 1915, and was attested at at Orange on the same day.

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 18th February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave for two days, and he was fined ten shillings. On 21st February 1916 he was charged with being absent from parade, and he was fined five shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 2 Hambleton Street, Albert Park, Melbourne, Victoria, and his next of kin was listed as his father, E. R. Griffiths, at the same address.

An initial Regimental No. 4784 is crossed out on his Attestation Paper, and replaced with 5089. Private Griffiths departed Sydney on the HMAT A16 Star of Victoria A16 on 31st March 1916 with two other Coo-ees, as 16th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on the 8th May 1916.

On 7th June 1916 Private Griffiths left Alexandria aboard a transport ship bound for France, and he arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

He was sent to the 4th Division Base Depot at Etaples, France. He marched in and was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion on 21st July 1916, when it was training at Naours, France.

On 21st August 1916 Private Griffiths was sent to the 3rd Canadian General Hospital at Boulogne, France, suffering Nephrites.

On 25th August 1916 he was evacuated to England aboard the Hospital Ship Brighton. Later that day he was admitted to the Guildford War Hospital at Guildford, England.

On 20th November 1916 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England. On 2nd December 1916 he was discharged from Hospital, and sent to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 2nd January 1917 Private Griffiths was sent to the Infantry Drafting Depot at Pernham Downs, England. On 22nd July 1917 he departed Southampton, bound for France. He arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot on 24th July 1917. He departed the 4th Australian Division Base Depot on the 9th of August 1917, and rejoined the 13th Battalion on 11th August 1917, when it was conducting working parties in the vicinity of Neuve Eglise, Belgium.

On 25th September 1917 the 13th Battalion was manning the front line trenches in the vicinity of Westhoek, Belgium, when Private Griffiths was wounded in action, receiving a shrapnel wound to his chest. He was moved back to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance. On 27th September 1917 he was moved to the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station, where he was placed aboard the 24th Ambulance Train, and moved to the 7th Canadian General Hospital at Etaples, France.

On 10th October 1917 he was placed aboard the hospital Ship Lille De Liege and evacuated to England. He was admitted to the Royal Surrey War Hospital at Guildford in England later that day.

Private Griffiths was discharged from hospital on 29th November 1917, and granted leave to report to the Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on the 13th of December 1917.

On 18th January 1918 Private Griffiths was admitted to the Sutton Veny Military Hospital, suffering Bronchitis. He was discharged and sent back to the Number 1 Command Depot on 12th February 1918.

On 16th March 1918 Private Griffiths was transferred to the Australian Motor Transport Service as a cleaner.

His service record includes a certified extract of a marriage certificate for a marriage on 21st August 1918 between William Henry Griffiths (soldier) and Kathleen Spires at Christ Church, Chelsea, England.

On 31st January 1919 Private Griffiths marched into the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England, to commence his return to Australia. On 5th February 1919 he was transferred to the Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

Private Griffiths departed England on 2nd April 1919 for return to Australia with his wife, aboard the H.T. Benalla. He arrived in Australia on 5th May 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 15th November 1919.

[1] ‘Blayney recruits’, Leader, 29 October 1915, p. 8, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842821