Monthly Archives: December 2014

John QUINN

John QUINN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4881), John Quinn was born at Moana, N.S.W. He gave his age as 29 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as fitter. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 165 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed to have had previous military service of 2 years in the Royal Australian Engineers and 3 years in the Royal Australian Artillery. He completed his medical on the 9th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Gilgandra on the 9th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was C/o Shire Council, Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as father, W. Quinn, Tocum Wall Post Office, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Quinn departed Sydney along with many other Coo-ees on the HMAT Star of England, arriving in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 16th April 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On the 4th June 1916 Private Quinn left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France, arriving at Marseille on the 11th June 1916.

On the 10th July 1916 he was transferred to the 46th Battalion.

On 23rd July 1916 Private Quinn was admitted to 1 Canadian General Hospital in Etaples with an old injury to the right leg. On 24th August 1916 he was transferred to 6 Convalescent Depot, Etaples. He was transferred to 5 Convalescent Depot in Boulogne on 10th September 1916. He was transferred to base details, and marched into Etaples on 16th October 1916. He was employed in the Sanitary Squad, Etaples.

He was handed to area command for duty on 10th July 1917, then was transferred from the field to 1st Anzac Rfts. Camp on 18th August 1917.

On 11th November 1917 when he was transferred the Australian Employment Company in France.

On 15th September 1918 he went on leave to the United Kingdom. On 29th September 1918 he rejoined his unit in France from leave.

He marched out to the Australian General Base Depot at Rouelles on 5th December 1918. He was transferred to England on 12th December 1918. He marched into No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth on 13th December 1918.

Private Quinn began his return to Australia on the 5th March 1919 aboard the Transport Nevasa, arriving at Sydney on the 23rd April 1919. He was discharged as medically unfit on the 3rd October 1919 with ‘disability – right lower limb crushed by shell’.

James MCKEOWN

James MCKEOWN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4862), James McKeown was born at Mudgee, N.S.W. He gave his age as 37 years, his marital status as married, and his occupation as dealer & skin buyer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8 ¼ inches tall, weight 11 stone 4 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had 15 months active service in South Africa. He completed his medical on the 8th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Gilgandra on the 9th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

In his service record the rank of Acting Corporal was assigned on the 9th October 1915. He was referred to as ‘Corporal McKeown’ in an article about some of the Coo-ees being home on leave in the The Gilgandra Weekly (7/1/1916, p. 3), and again as one of the corporals in an article listing the Coo-ees’ platoon sergeants and corporals at Liverpool Camp in the Leader (14/2/1916, p. 6).

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Lower Miller Street, Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as wife, Mrs R. McKeown, Lower Miller Street, Gilganda, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 with the rank of Acting Corporal, McKeown along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT Star of England, arriving in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 20th of May 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion.

On the 7th June 1916 Private McKeown was made Acting Corporal, and left Alexandria aboard the Transport Huntspill bound for France, arriving at Marseille on the 14th June 1916.

Acting Corporal McKeown served with the 45th Battalion while it was undertaking training, and relieving on the front line, on the Somme battlefields in France. On the 12th October 1916 he reverted to the rank of Private.

On 22nd November 1916 Private McKeown went to hospital from the field, then rejoined his Battalion in the field on 4th December 1916.

On 26th December 1916 he was sent to hospital, and admitted to No. 1 Australian General Hospital in Rouen on 31st December 1916 with Myocardis.

On 1st January 1917 Private McKeown was evacuated to England sick with Bronchitis, and was admitted to the Lewisham Military Hospital on 2nd January 1917. On 29th January 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford.

He was returned to Australia with Cardiac Insufficiency on the 4th May 1917 aboard the Hospital Ship Themistocles. He arrived in Australia on the 5th July 1917, and was discharged as medically unfit on the 31st July 1917.

Charles Edmond MARCHANT

Charles Edmond MARCHANT

 

Private Charles Marchant (Sunday Times, 8/10/1916)

Private Charles Marchant (Sunday Times, 8/10/1916)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4848), Charles Edmond Marchant was born at Mundooran, N.S.W. He gave his age as 21 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farmer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 11 stone 4 lbs., with a dark complexion, grey or brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 9th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested at Gilgandra by Captain Nicholas on the 9th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his name is listed as Charles Edward Marchant. His address as time of enrolment was Warrenderi, Tooraweemah [Tooraweenah] Road, Gilgandra N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, E. Marchant, Warrenderi, Tooraweemah Road, Gilgandra, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Marchant departed Sydney with many of the other Coo-ees on the HMAT Star of England, arriving in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 19th April 1916 he was taken on strength of the 45th Battalion.

Private Marchant received an accidental gun shot wound to the left elbow at Serapeum in Egypt on the 14th May 1916. According to an article in the Dubbo Liberal (29/8/1916, p. 2), While in Egypt he has the misfortune to meet with an accident two days before he was to have left for France. He was in the act of taking his rifle from the parapet, when it caught in a sand-bag and accidentally exploded, the bullet striking him on the left arm, splintering the bone.

He was hospitalized at No. 1 Australian Stationary Hospital at Ismailia on 15th May 1916, then sent to No. 3 Australian General Hospital at Abbassia on the 19th May 1916. He was then transferred to the Hospital Ship Karoola on the 5th July 1916 with a compound fracture of left humerus involving elbow joint, and returned to Australia.

He was medically discharged on the 13th September 1916.

Frank HUMPHREY

Frank HUMPHREY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 1887), Frank Humphrey was born at Hull, Yorkshire, England. He gave his age as 33 years and 3 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as bricklayer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 136 lbs., with a dark complexion, greenish eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that his previous military service consisted of seven months with Roystons Horse in South Africa during the Zulu rebellion. He completed his medical on the 9th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Gilgandra on the same day.

His address on his initial application to enlist paper was C/o Mrs McCrossen, Albert Street, Hornsby via Sydney, N.S.W.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion, however on the 4th January 1916 he was discharged with his services being no longer required, after a second period of being absent without leave.

Frank Humphrey attempted to enlist again on the 11th February 1916 at Wangaratta in Victoria. He was successful and allocated to the 3rd reinforcements for the 60th Infantry Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address as time of enrolment was Railway Hotel, Wangaratta, and his next of kin is listed as mother, Mrs Matilda Johnstone, 31 Thorsley Street, Princess Avenue, Hull, England.

He embarked for Egypt aboard the HMAT A17 Port Lincoln at Melbourne on the 1st May 1916, arriving at Port Suez on the 10th June 1916. He was taken on strength at Tel-el-Kebir on 9th July 1916. He was admitted to No. 2 Australian General Hospital at Tel-el-Kebir on 23rd July 1916 with Adentitis. He was discharged back to duty on 28th July 1916.

On the 2nd August 1916 Private Humphrey left Alexandria aboard the Transport Francovia bound for France.

After arrival in France Private Humphrey was admitted to the No. 7 Canadian Stationary Hospital at Le Harve with Bacillary Dysentry on 19th August 1916. He died of his illness on the 23rd August 1916, and is buried at the Ste Marie Cemetery at Le Harve, France.

Frank Humphrey's headstone at Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, France (Photograph: H. Thompson 2/9/2014)

Frank Humphrey’s headstone at Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, France (Photograph: H. Thompson 2/9/2014)

His name is also remembered on the Cooee March Memorial Park Gateway (Gilgandra).

Ste. Marie Cemetery – France

STE. MARIE CEMETERY

On Tuesday 2nd September 2014 Stephen and I visited Ste. Marie Cemetery, which is located in Le Havre, Seine-Maritime, France. It is a large general cemetery, and it would have been very difficult to find the grave we were looking for without the Cimetiere Sainte Marie map that was given to us by a very helpful man in the office at the West Entrance gate.

According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website http://www.cwgc.org, Le Havre was one of the ports that was used to disembark British and other Allied troops from August 1914, and housed 3 general and 2 stationery hospitals, and 4 convalescent depots by May 1917. Ste. Marie contains 1690 First World War Commonwealth burials. It also contains 364 Second World War burials.

Frank Humphrey, a bricklayer on enlistment per his service record, who joined the Coo-ees at Gilgandra (and was later discharged, and re-enlisted in February 1916), is the only Coo-ee buried in this cemetery. He died of illness at No. 7 Canadian Stationary Hospital at Le Harve on 23rd August 1916.

The photograph below shows part of the First World War Commonwealth military graves at St. Marie Cemetery. Frank Humphrey’s grave is third from the left in the third row on the left (just in view).

Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, France (Photograph: H. Thompson 2/9/2014)

Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, France (Photograph: H. Thompson 2/9/2014)

A photograph of the headstone on Frank Humphrey’s grave will be placed on his individual blog entry, and form part of a Roll of Honour for the fallen Coo-ees on this blog.

John Thomas SMITH

John Thomas SMITH

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4891), John Thomas Smith was born at Wigan, Lancashire, England. He gave his age as 30 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 10 stone 7 lbs., with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He completed his medical on the 16th October 1915 at Wellington, where he joined the Coo-ee March, and was attested by Captain Nicholas on the 19th October 1915 at Stuart Town. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Queen Street, Wellington, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as friend, L. A. Walters, Anhitn, 6 Fernbank Street, Marrickville, Sydney, N.S.W.

Private Smith departed Sydney on the HMAT Star of England on the 8th of March 1916. He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 25th April 1916 he was transferred from the 4th Training Battalion at Tel-el Kibir to the 4th Pioneer Battalion, where he was then taken on strength at Serapeum on the 29th April 1916.

On the 4th June 1916 Private Smith left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France, arriving at Marseille on the 11th June 1916.

Private Smith was one of four soldiers in his unit wounded in action on 10th January 1917, receiving a high explosive wound to his stomach, whilst the 4th Pioneer Battalion was undertaking work on the railway line near the village of Longueval, France. He was transferred to the 25th Ambulance Train on 11th January 1917 and admitted to the 12th General Hospital at Rouen on 12th January 1917 with a gun shot wound to the abdomen wall. He was transferred to the Convalescent Depot at Rouen on 24th January 1917, then to Base Depot “A” on 30th January 1917. He was transferred from the 4th Australian Division Base Depot back to his unit on 15th February 1917, rejoining from wounded on 17th January 1917.

He reported to hospital sick from the field on 29th June 1917, and was admitted to 39th General Hospital at Havre on 3rd July 1917. He marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot from hospital on 23rd July 1917. He then was readmitted to 39th General Hospital on 3rd August 1917, then on 31st August 1917 he was discharged, and returned to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot. On 7th September he marched out of the 4th Australian Division Base Depot, then returned to his unit in the field on 10th September 1917.

On the 25th October 1917 he was admitted to the 12th Canadian Field Ambulance with an accidentally dislocated right shoulder, then was transferred on the 26th October 1917 to the 13th Canadian Field Ambulance. On the 27th October he was transferred to 36th Ambulance Train, then admitted to 6th Convalescent Depot on 31st October 1917. He was discharged from the hospital at Etaples on the 8th November 1917, then marched in to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Havre on 10th November 1917. He returned to his unit in the field on 14th November 1917.

On 22nd February 1918 he reported to 13th Australian Field Ambulance sick, and was admitted to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance with Scabies. He returned to his unit on 28th February 1918.

Private Smith’s service record reports he was ‘wounded in action’ on the 5th April 1918, and was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance. According to the 4th Pioneer Battalion’s war diary, on 5th April 1918 the battalion was in camp near Henencourt Wood when it was shelled by German artillery. Private J. T. Smith is listed in the Casualties list as wounded by ‘H. E. Shell’. He was admitted to 22nd General Hospital at Camiers with a gun shot wound dislocated right shoulder on 6th April 1918. He was transferred to a hospital ship on 8th April 1918 and embarked for England, being admitted to Dorset County Hospital at Dorchester on 9th April 1918.

Private Smith died of his wounds on 23rd April, 1918, of gun shot wound dislocation of right shoulder (haemoptysis), at Dorset County Hospital, Dorset, England.

John Thomas Smith’s headstone at Melcombe Regis Cemetery, Weymouth, England (Photograph: H. Thompson 25/8/2014)

John Thomas Smith’s headstone at Melcombe Regis Cemetery, Weymouth, England (Photograph: H. Thompson 25/8/2014)

Private Smith was buried with full military honours on the 27th April, 1918 at Melcombe Regis Cemetery, Weymouth, Dorset, England.

Thomas THORNE

Thomas THORNE

Mrs Thorne with her son Thomas Thorne who joined at Lawson (Mirror of Australia 13/11/1915)

Mrs Thorne with her son Thomas Thorne who joined at Lawson (Mirror of Australia 13/11/1915)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4903), Thomas Thorne was born at Hay, N.S.W. He gave his age as 22 years and 2 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as motor driver. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 140 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to have 6 months experience with the Lawson Rifle Club. He joined the Coo-ee March at Lawson, and was attested at Lawson on the 7th November 1915.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.  He completed his medical at Liverpool on the 13th November 1915.

On Private Thorne’s embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Christabell Street, Lawson, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as wife, Mrs. M. A. Thorne, C/o Mrs Page, Casino, Carr-Street, Coogee, N.S.W.

Along with many of the Coo-ees, Private Thorne departed Sydney on the HMAT Star of England on the 8th March 1916, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

Following being admitted ill on the 11th April 1916 to the 31st General Hospital in Port Said, Egypt, he marched in to 4th Training Battalion, Egypt on 21st May 1916.

The name and embarkation date of the transport ship that took Thomas Thorne to England from Egypt is not recorded in his service record. The next entry in his service record notes Acting Sergeant Thorne admitted to Devonport Military Hospital on 16th June 1916, and then his death two days later of Pneumonia on 18th June 1916.

According to a letter from the Matron at the hospital in the Australian Red Cross Society Wounded and Missing Enquiry Bureau files, 1914-18 War 1DRL/0428  on the Australian War Memorial website, ‘Thorne was admitted to this hospital from the transport upon which he arrived in England on the 17-6-16. He was very ill with Broncho Pneumonia & the Doctors gave no hope of his recovery. He lived until the following day the 18-6-16 when passed peacefully away at 4.30 p.m.’

Thomas Thorne’s headstone at Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery, England (Photograph: H. Thompson 24/8/2014)

Thomas Thorne’s headstone at Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery, England (Photograph: H. Thompson 24/8/2014)

Sergeant Thorne was buried at Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery in Plymouth, Devon, England, on the 21st June 1916 with full military honours.

Thomas Thorne’s name is also listed on the Lawson War Memorial.

Harry DAVENPORT (aka Harry SWENDSON)

Harry DAVENPORT (Harry SWENDSON)

Harry Davenport (Photograph courtesy of Dave Murray)

Harry Davenport (Photograph courtesy of Dave Murray)

Per his Attestation paper on military service record (Lieutenant), Harry Davenport, with a note ‘true name Harry Swendson’, was born at Toronto, Canada. He gave his age as 41 years, his marital status as widower, and his occupation as Billiard Table Proprietor. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 5/8 inches tall, weight 168 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was written as ‘none’. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He stated that he was a member of the Wongarbon Rifle Club.

The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate reported on 29th October 1915 (p. 4) that ‘H. Davenport’ was one of the Wongarbon boys who had joined the Coo-ees.

According to an article in The Farmer and Settler on 19th October 1915 (p. 3), thirteen men stepped forward and gave their name, ‘either to march under Captain Nicholas, or to come after harvest’, when the Coo-ees recruited in Wongarbon on 14th October 1915.

It appears Harry Davenport was one of these men, but he needed time to get his affairs in order, as he did not join the Coo-ees until the 24th October 1915 at Orange, where he undertook his medical examination, and was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas. A note on the top of his Attestation paper in his service record said he ‘presented at Orange 24/10/15’.  His original Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form, addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Orange, gave his postal address as ‘Wongarbon’.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. During this time he was reported in The Farmer and Settler on 5th January 1916 (p. 3) as being a platoon sergeant in E Company, which consisted of many of the Coo-ees.

On his Application for a commission in the Australian Imperial Forces form dated 10th July 1916 in his service record he stated previous military experience of 7 years with the Vancouver Rifle Club in Canada, and being with the Wongarbon Rifle Club since July 1914. For education qualifications he stated he attended Central High School Toronto, Ont., Canada, and Wentworth Military Academy in Missouri U.S.A. Also recorded is “Sergt. “C” Coy 13th Battalion Kiama”. He gave his date of birth on this form as 31st March 1874, and his age as 42 years and 3 months. He gave his next of kin as daughter, Vieve Gwen Davenport, 324 Michigan Ave., Chicago, U.S.A. His religion is noted as Church of England on this form.

Private Davenport was sent to the A.I.F. Officers Training School at Duntroon where he trained to be an officer. On the 25th July 1916 he was appointed a Second Lieutenant.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 493 Dowling Street, Moore Park, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as a friend, Miss F. Pole-Hore, 493 Dowling Street, Moore Park, Sydney, N.S.W.

On the 8th November 1916 Second Lieutenant Davenport departed Sydney as part of the 22nd reinforcement for the 4th Infantry Battalion aboard the SS Port Nicholson. 

He arrived at Devonport in England on 10th January 1917. He marched into the 1st Training Battalion at Durrington the same day.

On the 18th June 1917 Second Lieutenant Davenport departed England for France, arriving at the 1st Division Base Depot at Le Harve on 20th June 1917.

On 11th July 1917 Second Lieutenant Davenport left Le Harve to join the 4th Battalion. He marched in on 15th July 1917 whilst the Battalion was conducting training in the Bray Sur Somme area of France.

On the 16th July 1917 he was promoted to Lieutenant.

Less than three months after his arrival in France, on 4th October 1917 Lieutenant Davenport was wounded in action, being shot in the chest, while the 4th Battalion was engaged in an attack at Broodseinde Ridge, Belgium.  He was evacuated to an Aid Post, but died of his wounds prior to arrival.

He was buried on Broodenside Ridge, however his grave marker was destroyed in further fighting.

Lieutenant Davenport has no known grave, and is remembered on the Menin Gate Memorial at Ieper (Ypres), Belgium.

Swendson H. (served as Davenport H.) name in Lieutenant section on 4th Bn. Australian Infantry Battalion panel at the Menin Gate Memorial, Ieper (Ypres), Belgium (Photograph: H. Thompson 11/9/2012)

Swendson H. (served as Davenport H.) name in Lieutenant section on 4th Bn. Australian Infantry Battalion panel at the Menin Gate Memorial, Ieper (Ypres), Belgium (Photograph: H. Thompson 11/9/2012)

His name is also listed on the Wongarbon Soldiers Memorial, and the Atchison County WWI Memorial Honor Roll at Atchison, Kansas.

Harry Davenport appears to have had a few mysteries in his past. It is not known exactly when he arrived in Australia, but he is reported in an article in The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate on 12th February 1915 (p. 2) as having purchased a billiard room, fruit and tobacconist’s shop in Wongarbon.

According to correspondence from Harry Augustus Swendson’s family in Harry Davenport’s service record, his family had no knowledge of Harry Davenport marrying, or having a daughter. His family had received letters (addressed from H. Davenport) and a photograph from him in his AIF uniform while he was overseas on active service before he was killed.

According to an article titled ‘Lt. Harry Swendson’ on the Shawnee County Casualties in WWI web page http://www.shawneeww1.info/stories/storiesSwendson.html, his actual date of birth was 31st March 1880, not 31st March 1874 as he claimed in his AIF service record, which would have made him only 35 years of age when he joined the Coo-ee March, not 41 years as he claimed. He was also actually born at Hawthorn, Atchison County, Kansas, not Toronto, Canada, as he had claimed on his application papers.

He is noted on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission site as being the son of S. and Sarah A. Swendson, a native of Hawthorn, Kansas, U.S.A., and being aged 35 years when he died.

James MAHER

James MAHER

James Maher, 1915 (Photograph courtesy of L. Leo)

James Maher, 1915 (Photograph courtesy of L. Leo)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4847), James Maher was born at Gilgandra, N.S.W. He gave his age as 18 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farm labourer.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches, weight 136 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed to have 7 months previous experience with the Gilgandra Rifle Club. He completed his medical, and was attested, on the 14th October 1915 at Dubbo, which was the day the Co-ees left Dubbo on the Coo-ee March.

His official date of joining the AIF in his service record is the 14th October 1915.  James “Jim” Maher is however known as one of the 35 recruits from Gilgandra – one of those who caught up along the way.

There is an ‘Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force’ document in his military service record which is signed by both his father John Maher, and his mother Georgina Ellen Maher, giving parental permission for him to join, as he was under the age of 21.

It is unclear whether he left Dubbo with the Coo-ees, or did not catch up with the Coo-ees until further down the march route, as per family stories he did not join the Coo-ee March until Wallerawang .[1]

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Springfield, Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, J. Maher, Springfield, Gilgandra, N.S.W.

Along with many of the Coo-ees, Private Maher departed Sydney on the HMAT Star of England on the 8th March 1916. He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916. On the 20th May 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Maher left Alexandria aboard the Transport Kinafanus Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseille on the 8th June 1916.

On the 4th January 1917 Private Maher was appointed Lance Corporal, when the Battalion was at Dernacourt, France.

On the 2rd February 1917 the Battalion was being relieved from the front line near Guedecourt. Lance Corporal Maher was one of 10 members of the Battalion wounded on this day, with another 5 men were killed. Lance Corporal Maher received a shrapnel wound to his buttock and ankle. He was hospitalised and evacuated to England.

On the 16th December 1917 Lance Corporal Maher began his return to Australia, departing England on board the Hospital Ship No 2. He arrived in Australia on the 16th February 1917, and was discharged on the 10th July 1918.

[1] Leo, L., email correspondence, 31st July 2014.

Updating blog entries for individual Coo-ees

I am working through the blogs I have posted for individual Coo-ees to date, adding details about their description from their medical in their service records –  height, weight, complexion, colour of eyes, and hair, and also their religious denomination.

I am also adding details for any local war memorials that list the name of fallen Coo-ees.

I will also update previous blog entries when I obtain more photographs, or find out more information from newspaper articles and other sources.

If you are following this blog by email, please note that these updated blog entries will not be re-posted, so please check this website from time to time to see what changes have been made to the records.