Category Archives: Recruits

Thomas Joseph WARD

Thomas Joseph WARD

‘Private Thomas Joseph Ward’. (1919). Australia’s fighting sons of the empire : portraits and biographies of Australians in the Great War. Sydney : B. Jackson & Co, National Library of Australia, http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-35909257

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4914), Thomas Joseph Ward was born at Maclean, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as groom.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 10 stone, with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was recorded as Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no  previous military service.

He completed his medical examination on 11th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested by Lieutenant R. Howe at Parramatta on 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Duke Street, Grafton, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, M. [Michael] Ward, at the same address.[2]

On 8th March 1916, Private Ward, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Ward was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company at Tel-el-Kebir in Egypt (along with fellow Coo-ees Private Brown, Private Richardson, Private Megarrity, Private Lloyd and Private Spicer).

On the 16th of April1916 he was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company.

The Grafton Daily Examiner newspaper reported on 6th June 1916:

‘Private T. J. Ward writes to his mother in Duke-street, dated April 23, that he has arrived in Egypt, after a splendid trip. The young soldier is in perfect health, and expected to leave shortly for France with the Cyclists’ Corps’.[3]

On 6th June 1916 Private Ward departed Alexandra, Egypt, aboard a transport bound for France.  He arrived on Marseilles on 15th June 1916.

After arriving in France, an extract from other letter Private Ward wrote home was published in the Grafton Daily Examiner, on 28th August 1916:

 “I like this country very much, as it puts me in mind of New South Wales, but I think it is a better country. After the war, if I have the luck to get back home again, I will be making my way back here. I am looking forward to having a birthday party in a few days”.[4]

After arriving in France, he was attached to 2nd Anzac Headquarters as an escort. He re-joined the Cyclist Battalion on 28th September 1916.

On 22nd January 1917 Private Ward went on leave to England. He returned to the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 7th February 1917.

On 24th February 1917 Private Ward was charged with Insolence to an NCO. He was awarded 7 days field punishment no. 2.

On 26th March 1917 he was detached for duty with the Anti Aircraft Section 2nd Anzac Headquarters.

He rejoined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 9th June 1917.

On 11th June 1917 Private Ward was sent to a Lewis Gun School. He re-joined the Battalion on 10th September 1917.

On 3rd December 1917 he was detached again to Anti Aircraft Section 2nd Anzac Corps.  He re-joined his Battalion on 9th December 1917. He was then detached again to Anti Aircraft 2nd Anzac Corps on 16th December 1917, then re-joined his Battalion on 23rd December 1917.

On 16th January 1918 Private Ward was transferred to the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion from the 22nd Corps Cyclist Battalion (late 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion) in France.

On 11th April 1918 Private Ward was detached for duty with the Corps Commanders Guard. He rejoined the Battalion on 21st April 1918.

On 24th July 1918 Private Ward went on leave to England. He returned to the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 9th August 1918.

On 18th April 1919 Private Ward departed France to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at Southampton, England, and marched into No. 2 Group on 19th April 1919.

Private Ward appears to have been reluctant to leave England, as on 13th June 1916 he was charged at Sutton Veny with evading embarkation and being absent without leave from 0400 on 4th June 1919 till 1800 on 12th June 1919. He was awarded 21 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 30 days pay.

On 1st July 1919 Private Ward departed England aboard the H.T. Frankfurt bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 20th August 1919.

He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 13th October 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WARD THOMAS JOSEPH

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Thomas Joseph Ward, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[3] PERSONAL. (1916, June 6). Daily Examiner (Grafton, NSW : 1915 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved June 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article194814480

[4] PERSONAL. (1916, August 28). Daily Examiner (Grafton, NSW : 1915 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved June 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article194812650

John Beveridge BUXTON

John Beveridge BUXTON

Private Jack Buxton (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 5/8/1916)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4737), John Beveridge Buxton was born at Five Dock, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 18 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 8 ½ inches tall, weight 135 lbs., with a fair complexion, hazel eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had 4 years universal military training [cadets]as previous military service.

His father George Buxton signed to give his consent on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form dated 11th November 1915.  He completed his medical examination at Parramatta on 11th November 1915.  He was attested by Lieutenant R. Howe at Parramatta on 11th November 1915.

After a successful recruiting meeting the evening before, where 41 men had offered themselves as recruits, the Coo-ees left Parramatta on the morning of 11th November 1915, with an official count of 27 new recruits from that town.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Buxton went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate noted that Buxton was one of the local soldiers leaving with the Coo-ees  ‘for the front’ on 8th March 1916.[3]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was his address was Royal Hotel, Church Street, Parramatta.[4]  His next of kin was listed as his father, G. Buxton, at the same address. (His father George Buxton was the licencee of the Royal Hotel at Parramatta).[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Buxton departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England along with many of the other Coo-ees.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 15th June 1916 a Courts Martial was held at Ismailia, Egypt, where Private Buxton was charged with stealing and receiving stolen goods. Private Buxton was found not guilty of stealing but found guilty of receiving stolen property. He was sentenced to 90 days Field Punishment No. 2 which was commuted to 40 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 17th June 1916 Private Buxton left Alexandria on a transport ship bound for France.  He arrived at  Marseilles on 25th June 1916.

The 5th Division Cyclist Company was moved into the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion upon it’s formation in July 1916.

On 9th October 1916 Private Buxton was detached for duty with the Town Major at Armentieres.  He re-joined his unit on 29th May 1917.

On 27th June 1917 he was detached to the Lewis Gun School.  He re-joined his unit in the field on 23rd July 1917.

The next day, on 24th July 1917, Private Buxton went on leave. He returned to the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 9th August 1917.

On 8th September 1917 he was detached to Lewis Gun Section.  He re-joined his unit from the Lewis Gun Section on 20th September 1917.

On 20th November 1917 he was detached for duty with 3rd Otago Battalion.  He returned to his unit on 25th November 1917.

On 27th November 1917 he was charged with being absent without leave from a 2 a.m.  working party on 25th November 1917. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 16th January 1918 Private Buxton was taken on strength of the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion from 22nd Corps Cyclist Battalion (late 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion).

On 23rd February 1918 Private Buxton was detached for duty with the 7th Field Company Australian Engineers.

On 19th March 1918 he was transferred to the 7th Field Company Australian Engineers in Belgium, and his rank changed from Private to Sapper.

On 13th June 1918 Sapper Buxton was evacuated to the 5th Australian Field Ambulance in France sick. He was sent back to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station. On 15th June 1918 he was admitted to the 55th General Hospital at Boulogne, France. On 19th June 1918 he was transferred to the 10th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne.

On 1st July 1918 he was moved to the Australian Convalescent Depot at Le Harve, France, where he was admitted on 2nd July 1918. He was discharged on 1st August 1918, and marched into the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve.

Sapper Buxton re-joined his unit in France on 8th August 1918.

On 31st August 1918 he was granted leave to England.

Sapper Buxton re-joined the 7th Field Company Engineers in France on 19th September 1918.  Upon returning he was charged with overstaying his leave to England by three days, from 14th to 17th September 1918. He was awarded 12 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 15 days pay.

On 15th December 1918 Sapper Buxton was detached for duty with the 2nd Australian Motor Transport Company.

He re-joined the 7th Field Company Engineers in France on 19th January 1919.

On 12th March 1919 Sapper  Buxton marched in to the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 15th March 1919 he was admitted to the 39th General Hospital at Le Havre with scabies. He was discharged on 20th March 1919.

On 25th March 1919 Sapper Buxton departed France bound for England. The next day he marched into No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

On 15th May 1919 Sapper Buxton departed England aboard the H.T. Ypiringa, bound for Australia.

On 20th May 1919 he was admitted to the ship’s hospital suffering from scabies. He was discharged from the ship’s hospital on 30th May 1919.

Sapper Buxton arrived in Sydney on 6th July 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 11th September 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, BUXTON J B

[2] THE PROCESSION. (1915, November 13). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 11. Retrieved December 30, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86101767

[3] WAR ITEMS.The “Coo-ees” off.  (1916, March 8). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 2. Retrieved March 12, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86082019

[4] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, John Beveridge Buxton, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[5] Parramatta Licensing Court (1913, December 20). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 4. Retrieved June 4, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article85974015

 

Eugene NORRIS

Eugene NORRIS

Pte. Eugene Roland Norris (Cumberland Argus & Fruitgrowers Advocate, 2/2/1918)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4566), Eugene Norris was born at Paddington, Sydney.[1] He gave his age as 21 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as horse driver. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 2 inches tall, weight 9 stone, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He was reported in The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate as being ‘one of the famous Coo-ees who marched through Parramatta’.[2]

His ‘Joined on’ date on his Attestation Paper was 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield). He was attested on 11th November 1915, and completed his medical examination at Liverpool on 13th November 1915. (An anomaly in his service record is that his ‘Oath to be taken by person being enlisted’ section in his Attestation Paper is recorded as having being taken at Liverpool, but the Attesting Officer’s signature is the same as for several of the other Coo-ees who were recorded as having being  attested at Ashfield on the same day).

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

He was one of 14 ‘local boys’ (along with several other Coo-ees) to be presented with a sheepskin vest and a money belt, and a wristlet watch, at a farewell held in the Elite Hall in Guildford on Thursday 9th December 1915.[3]

On 19th December 1915 Private Norris was charged with being absent without leave from 15th December 1915 until 19th December 1915. He was fined 1 pound.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Albert Parade, Guildford, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, W. [William] Norris, at the same address.[4]

On 16th February 1916 Private Norris was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas on active service, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 with the 14th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

He arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Battalion in Egypt.

On 12th May 1916 he was transferred to the 57th Battalion.

On 17th June 1916 Private Norris left Alexandria aboard H.T. Kalyan bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 24th June 1916.

Private Norris served with the 57th Battalion on the Western Front in France until 14th October 1916 Private Norris was sent to the 1st Casualty Clearing Station with keloid on his heel. The 57th Battalion had marched to billets at Estaires, France, the day before, and it was noted in the Battalion diary that ‘a few men suffered from slightly blistered feet due chiefly to new boots’.[5] On the 16th of October 1916 he was placed aboard a hospital train and evacuated to the 35th General Hospital at Calais, France.

He was discharged from hospital on 16th November 1916, and sent to the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 4th December 1916 Private Norris was charged with being absent without leave from the No. 1 Training Camp parade on 2nd December 1916, when the 57th Battalion was at Mametz, France. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2. On 10th December 1916 Private Norris re-joined the 57th Battalion camped at Montauban, France.[6]

On 20th August 1917 Private Norris was granted leave to England. He re-joined the 57th Battalion on 3rd September 1917.

On 27th October 1917 the 57th Battalion was being relieved by the 28th Battalion at Broodseinde, Belgium, when the Germans launched a gas barrage.[7] Private Norris was wounded by gas and a shrapnel wound to his thigh. He was moved back to the 3rd Canadian Casualty Clearing Station. On 28th October 1917 he was placed aboard the 32nd Ambulance Train and admitted to the 55th General Hospital at Boulogne, France.

On 5th November 1917 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Princess Elizabeth for evacuation to England. On 6th November 1917 he was admitted to the Colchester Military Hospital.

On 14th November 1917 he was transferred to Suffolk Hospital in Bury St Edmonds.

On 30th November 1917 he was granted leave to report to the No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England, on 14th December 1917.

On 2nd February 1918 Private Norris marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 21st February 1918 he departed Southampton bound for France. On 22nd February 1918 he marched into the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

He re-joined the 57th Battalion in France on 28th February 1918.

On 11th November 1918 Private Norris was granted leave to England.

On 25th November 1918 whilst still on leave he was admitted to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England sick. He was discharged on 12th December 1918 and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 15th December 1918.

He reported back from leave two days late on 17th December 1918 and was dealt with by the Orderly Room.

Private Norris departed England on 2nd January 1919 for return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Karmala, with the note ‘for influenza’.

He arrived in Australia on 22nd February 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 4th May 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, NORRIS EUGENE

[2] OF “THE BOYS.” (1917, November 17). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 11. Retrieved April 9, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86087988

[3] FAREWELLING. (1915, December 11). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 5. Retrieved April 23, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86106306

[4] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Eugene Norris, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/R1754195

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/74 – 57th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/74/9 – October 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/74 – 57th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/74/11 – December 1916.

[7] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/74 – 57th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/74/21 – October 1917.

Richard Charles WHEELER

Richard Charles WHEELER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5777), ‘Richard Charlie Wheeler’, as he signed his name, was born at Hammersmith, London, England.[1]  (His name is also recorded as Richard Charles Wheeler, and Charles Richard Wheeler, on various documents in his service record). He gave his age as 18 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 9 stone, with a dark complexion, bluish grey eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination on 8th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Gilgandra on 9th October 1915, before the commencement of the Coo-ee March.

‘Charles R. Wheeler’ was reported in The Farmer and Settler as one of the first 25 recruits to enlist at Gilgandra to join the Coo-ee March.[2]

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll, his name is recorded as ‘Charles Richard Wheeler’, and his address at time of enrolment was not recorded. His next of kin was recorded as his father, C. [Charles] Wheeler, 5 River Terrace, Crisp Road, Hammersmith, London, England.[3]

On 3rd May 1916 Private Wheeler departed Sydney on the HMAT A46 Clan McGillivray, along with fellow Coo-ees Private Herringe, Private Saunders and Private Keating, as part of the 18th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

He arrived in Egypt in June 1916.

On 6th August 1916 Private Wheeler departed Egypt bound for England aboard the Transport Megantic.

Upon arrival in England he marched into the 4th Training Battalion at Rollerstone, England.

On 7th October 1916 Private Wheeler was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 5th October 1916 until noon on 7th October 1916. He was awarded 48 hours detention, and fined 3 days pay.

On 14th October 1916 Private Wheeler departed England bound for France. He marched into the 4th Australian Infantry Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, later that day.

On 30th October 1916 Private Wheeler was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion when it was training at Vauchelles, France.[4]

On 1st February 1917 Private Wheeler reported sick. He was back with the Battalion on 3rd February 1917.

On 28th July 1917 Private Wheeler was charged with conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline by writing disrespectfully of his Superior Officer. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 18th September 1917 Private Wheeler went to England on leave. He re-joined the Battalion on 29th September 1917.

On 25th October 1917 Private Wheeler was detached to duty at the 3rd Australian General Hospital at Abbeyville, France.

On 13th April 1918 Private Wheeler was charged with neglect of duty in that he was absent from parade on the night of 11th February 1918. He was awarded 7 days field Punishment No. 2.

On 3rd May 1918 Private Wheeler was charged with whilst on active service drunkeness in Abbeville on 1st May 1918. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 26th June 1918 Private Wheeler was hospitalised with conjunctivitis. He was discharged on 30th June 1918.

On 14th July 1918 Private Wheeler was hospitalised with gastritis. He was discharged on 28th July 1918.

On 7th August 1918 Private Wheeler marched into the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 14th August 1918 he marched out to re-join the 13th Battalion. He re-joined the Battalion on 19th August 1918 when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Harbonnieres, France.[5]

On 27th September 1918 Private Wheeler went to England on leave. He returned to his unit from leave in France on 18th October 1918.

On 24th October 1918 he was charged  with overstaying leave in London from 0730 on the 12th of October 1918 till 0730 on the 17th of October 1918. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 19 days pay.

On 3rd April 1919 Private Wheeler marched out to England and reported to the 1st Training Brigade at Weymouth, England.

On 22nd May 1919 Private Wheeler was charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 15th May 1919 until 2200 on 16th May 1919. He was awarded 3 days confined to camp, and fined 1 days pay.

On 9th July 1919 ‘Richard Charles Wheeler’ married 19 year old Rose Gertrude Winifred Parsons at the All Soul’s Parish Church of Harlesden, England.

On 18th August 1919 Private Wheeler was charged with being absent without leave from 0900 on 4th August 1919 until 2400 on 5th August 1919. He was admonished and fined 2 days pay.

His service record records that Private Wheeler and his wife embarked for Australia on 8th October 1919 aboard the H.T. Benalla.

 They arrived in Australia on 29th November 1919.

He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 7th February 1920.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WHEELER RICHARD CHARLIE

[2] THE ROUTE MARCH (1915, October 12). The Farmer and Settler (Sydney, NSW : 1906 – 1955), p. 3. Retrieved April 14, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116668904

[3] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, ‘Charles Richard Wheeler’, HMAT Clan McGillivray A46, 3rd May 1916.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, October 1916.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, August 1918.

Patrick GOOLEY

Patrick GOOLEY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4781), Patrick Gooley was born at Burrowa, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 43 years and 6 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as contractor. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 11 stone 11 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

Gooley was reported in the Wellington Times as one of the men who enlisted with the Coo-ees at Wellington.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Wellington). He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 20th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Stuart Town to Euchareena).

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 4th January 1916 Private Gooley was charged with being absent without leave from 16th December 1915 to 17th December 1915, and from 20th  December 1915 to 3rd January 1916.  He was fined 10 shillings, and forfeited 12 days pay.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 56 George Street, Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his wife, Mrs C. Gooley, Glanmere [sic], via Bathurst, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Gooley departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Gooley left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Gooley served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 29th November 1916 he was detached for duty with the Australian Army Service Corps.

He went on leave from France on 29th August 1917 to 8th September 1917.

Private Gooley served with the 26th Australian Army Service Corps until he re-joined the 45th Battalion on 7th October 1918.

On 17th October 1918 he was sent to the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Harve, France, for a Medical Board, where he was classed as having senility.

On 31st October 1918 he was transferred to England.

On 1st November 1918 he marched into the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 4th December 1918 Private Gooley departed England aboard the H.M.A.T. Somerset, bound for Australia for medical discharge.

He arrived in Australia on 16th January 1919.

He was discharged from the A.I.F. medically unfit on 4th February 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, GOOLEY P

[2] HITCHEN’S COO-EES. (1915, October 18). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388424

 

Edgar Lewis CUDDEFORD

Edgar Lewis CUDDEFORD (MM)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5352), Edgar Lewis Cuddeford was born at Albury, N.S.W.[1]  (His name was recorded as Edward Lewis Cudderford on his embarkation roll).[2] He gave his age as 18 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as ‘engineering’ on his Attestation Paper. (His occupation was listed as ‘Engineer’ on his embarkation roll, however he was an engineering apprentice at Clyde Engineering Company, with 1 year and 11 months served of a 5 year apprenticeship, at the time he enlisted).[3]  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 2 ½ inches tall, weight 110 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to have 4 years previous military service in the Senior Cadets.

He completed his medical examination at Parramatta on 10th November 1915 (where the Coo-ees held a recruitment meeting, and stayed that evening). He was attested by Lieutenant Edward V. Steel at Ashfield on 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Yelta, Station Street, Harris Park, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his mother, Mrs M. J. [Mary Jane] Cuddeford, Mahonga Station, via Albury, N.S.W.[4]

On 9th April 1916 Private Cuddeford departed Sydney on the HMAT Nestor A71 with the 17th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion (along with several other Coo-ees), bound for Egypt.

Photograph of HMAT A71 Nestor loaded with troops on an earlier voyage, taken 11 October 1915. Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. PB0607.

On 20th May 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 7th June 1916 Private Cuddeford left Alexandria aboard the transport Huntspill, bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

He was sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 9th August 1916 Private Cuddeford was taken on strength of the 45th Battalion when it was manning support trenches in the vicinity of Pozieres, France.[5]

Private Cuddeford served with the 45th Battalion through its actions on the Western Front as a Battalion Headquarters runner, undertaking dispatch work.

He managed to survive the war unscathed. He stated in an oral history interview undertake later in his life (in 1983), that ‘I was fortunate that way’ and that ‘I never got wounded’.[6]

On 11th March 1918 Private Cuddeford was granted leave to England. He re-joined the 45th Battalion in France on 3rd April 1918.

On 18th July 1918 Private Cuddeford was sent to the 4th Army Rest Camp. He re-joined the Battalion on 28th July 1918.

On 18th September 1918 the 45th Battalion was engaged in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Le Verguier, France,  in which Private Cuddeford took part.

He was later awarded a Military Medal. The citation reads: ‘For bravery and devotion to duty during attack of 18th September, 1918, on old British outpost line near LE VERGUIER. Private Cuddeford is a Battalion Headquarters Runner, and during the advance, continually carried messages under adverse and most trying circumstances to various portions of the attacking line, always returning and giving voluntary and correct information of the situation. During consolidation, and after, owing to casualties in runners Private Cuddeford on numerous occasions volunteered to take messages, always proving most reliable and cheerfully carrying out his duties.’[7]

Notification of Private Cuddeford’s  award was gazetted in Second Supplement No. 31512,  to The London Gazette, 20th August 1919 (page 10585), and was also published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, no. 135, dated 11th December, 1919.[8]

On 30th January 1919 Private Cuddeford marched out of the 45th Battalion to commence his return to Australia.

On 10th February 1919 he departed Le Harve, France, bound for England. He arrived at Weymouth on 11th February 1919.

On 13th April 1919 Private Cuddeford departed England aboard the H.T. Commonwealth bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 12th June 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 7th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L

[2] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Edward Lewis Cuddeford,  5352.

[3] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L  ; FIRST TO BE KILLED. (1916, September 2). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 11. Retrieved April 8, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86069235

[4] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Edward Lewis Cuddeford,  5352.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/6 – August 1916.

[6] Edgar Lewis Cuddeford MM (5352) as a private 45th Infantry Battalion AIF, France 1916-1918, interviewed by Dr Alistair Thomson on 6 September 1983, Australian War Veterans of the Great War – 1914 – 1918 Oral history project, 6 September 1983, AWM Accession no. S01308, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C88153

[7] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L

[8] The London Gazette, 19 August 1919, Supplement 31512, p. 10585,  https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/31512/supplement/10585 ; Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation (1919, December 11). Commonwealth of Australia Gazette (National : 1901 – 1973), p. 2373. Retrieved April 8, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232512820

 

 

 

Thomas LIPSCOMBE

Thomas LIPSCOMBE

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4826), Thomas Lipscombe was born at Collingwood, Victoria.[1] He gave his age as 35 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was [height not recorded], weight 161 lbs., with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His ‘Joined on’ date on his Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form was 9th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Springwood to Penrith). The Oath to the taken by person being enlisted section on his Attestation Paper was dated from 9th November 1915. His Statement of Service in his service record is also dated from 9th November 1915, so it appears he may have joined the Coo-ee March on this day.

He completed his medical examination at Ashfield on 11th November 1915, and was attested at Ashfield by Lieutenant F. Middenway on the 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 6th January 1916 Private Lipscombe was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp from 9th December 1915 to 3rd January 1916. He was fined.

On 5th February 1916 Private Lipscombe was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp for 5 days. He was fined 25 shillings.

The Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent reported on 3rd March 1916 that ‘’Private T. Lipscombe has been in town the past few days taking farewell of his friends prior to preceeding to the front, whither he expects to sail next week’.[2]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was his address was Australian Hotel, Dubbo.[3]  His next of kin was listed as friend, ‘P. J. Kennay’, Australian Hotel, Dubbo, N.S.W.  [This was probably P.J. Kennedy, licencee of the Austalian Hotel, Dubbo].[4]

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

On 8th March 1916 Private Lipscombe departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England along with many of the other Coo-ees.  He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Lipscombe was transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 22nd May 1916 he was transferred to the 110th Battery.

On 1st  June 1916 he was designated a Driver, and transferred to the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.

On 5th June 1916 Driver Lipscombe left Alexandria aboard the HMT Oriana bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 13th June 1916.

On 22nd January 1918 Driver Lipscombe went on leave to Paris.  He returned to the 10th Field Artillery Brigade on the 3rd of February 1918.

However, he had overstayed his leave, and had been due back on the 30th of January 1918.  He was arrested and held in detention.  Driver Lipscombe was found guilty of being absent without leave at a Court Martial held on 3th February 1918.  He was awarded 28 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 42 days pay.

On 18th August 1918 Driver Lipscombe was granted leave to England. He returned to the 10th Field Artillery Brigade in France on 9th September 1918.

On 3rd December 1918 Driver Lipscombe departed France, bound for England to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at Folkestone, England, later that day.

On 9th January 1919 Driver Lipscombe was charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 7th January 1919 till 2120 on 8th January 1919. He was fined 1 days pay.

Driver Lipscombe departed Liverpool, England on 19th February 1919 for return to Australia aboard the H.T. Orca.

He arrived in Sydney on 3rd April 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 18th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, LIPSCOMBE THOMAS

[2] Our Soldiers. (1916, March 3). Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent (NSW : 1887 – 1932), p. 1. Retrieved April 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228634920

[3] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Thomas Lipscombe, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[4] AUSTRALIAN HOTEL. (1917, December 4). Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent (NSW : 1887 – 1932), p. 1. Retrieved April 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228195676

 

Andrew George LENNOX

Andrew George LENNOX

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4824),  Andrew George Lennox was born at Bourke, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 19 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as railway porter.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 185 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and medium brown hair.  His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

A send-off was held on Thursday 28th October 1915 at the Court House Hotel in Cobar for Andrew Lennox, Norman Francisco, and brothers Walter and Robert Mitchell, and they were then cheered by many friends when they left Cobar by train on Saturday 30th October 1915 to join the A.I.F.[2]

All four of them completed their medical examinations, and were attested, at Dubbo on Monday 2nd November 1915, (the day the Coo-ees were at Lithgow).

Andrew Lennox then traveled by train with these three other Cobar men to catch up with the Coo-ees.  They were waiting to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees arrived at Mt. Victoria three days later, on Thursday 4th November 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Lennox went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Private Lennox and fellow Coo-ee Private Francisco while home on leave were given a farewell at the Star Hotel in Cobar on Saturday, 1st January 1916.[4]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Marshall Street, Cobar, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his father, A. Lennox, at the same address.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Lennox, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel El Kebir, Egypt.

On 4th June 1916 Private Lennox left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

He served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France and Belgium.

On 1st September 1918 Private Lennox went on leave to England.

He returned to the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 17th September 1918, and was transferred to the 4th Machine Gun Battalion in France.

On 16th November 1918 Private Lennox was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance sick. He was moved back to the 50th Casualty Clearing Station on 17th November 1918.

On 22nd November 1918 he was placed aboard the 2nd Ambulance Train and moved to the 2nd Convalescent Depot, arriving on 23rd November 1918. On 24th November 1918 he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital at Le Harve, France, where he was admitted on 25th November 1918.

On 26th December 1918 Private Lennox was placed aboard a Hospital Ship for evacuation to England.  He was admitted to the Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England, on 27th December 1918.

On 10th May 1919 he was discharged from hospital, and sent to the Convalescent Training Depot at Parkhouse, England.

On 12th May 1919 Private Lennox was sent back to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford sick.

He was discharged from hospital on 21st July 1919, and sent to the No. 2 Group at Sutton Veny, England.

On 22nd August 1919 Private Lennox left England on the H.T.t Anchises bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 13th October 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 5th December 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, LENNOX ANDREW GEORGE

[2] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 30 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136723099

[3] Summary’, Western Age, 6 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136724708

[4] Valedictory. (1916, January 4). Western Age (Dubbo, NSW : 1914 – 1932), p. 2. Retrieved February 18, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136725949

[5] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Andrew George Lennox, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

James MCGEECHAN

James McGEECHAN

Per his military service record (Depot), James McGeechan was born at Lithgow, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 27 years and 3 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as engine driver.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 4 ½ inches tall, weight 127 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Presbyterian.  He claimed to have no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination at Lithgow on 3rd November 1915.  He was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway at Lithgow on 3rd November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Lithgow to Hartley).

His postal address on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form was Bridge Street, Lithgow.

His next of kin on his Attestation Paper was listed as his stepmother, Bridge Street, Lithgow.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp with the Coo-ees.

On 17th November 1915 Private McGeechan went before a Medical Board at Liverpool Camp, where he was found to suffer from Hemiplegia, and was unfit for active service.

On 22nd November 1915 Private McGeechan was charged with being absent from his post while on guard on 20th November 1915. He was issued a warning.

On 29th November 1915 Private McGeechan was discharged medically unfit.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, MCGEECHAN J

John HOGAN

John HOGAN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2354), John Hogan was born at Gunnedah, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 45 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 154 lbs., with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 17th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees rested at Wellington), and was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 19th October 1915. He claimed to have previous military service in the Boer War.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went Menangle Light Horse Camp as reinforcement for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

On his embarkation roll his address as time of enrolment was Wellington, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed was listed as friend, James William Hoy, Hermitage Flat, Lithgow, N.S.W.[2]

Trooper Hogan departed Sydney on the HMAT Palermo A56 on 18th April 1916, with the 16th Reinforcements for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

After arriving in Egypt he was taken on strength by the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-el Kebir on 10th June 1916.

On 6th July 1916 he was taken on strength of the 2nd Double Squadron at Serapeum.

On 30th July 1916 Trooper Hogan he was transferred to the 1st Field Squadron Engineers Australian and New Zealand Mounted Division at Kantara, Egypt.

On 30th September 1917 Sapper Hogan was detached for duty with the Gamli Light Railway.

On 25th January 1918 he was sent to the military Dump at Ludd, Palestine.

He returned to his unit on 9th March 1919.

Sapper Hogan began his return to Australia on 3rd July 1919,  aboard the H.T. Malta at Kantara, Egypt.

Sapper Hogan arrived in Australia on 10th August 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 25th September 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, HOGAN J 2354

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, John Hogan 2354, HMAT Palermo A56, 18th April 1916.