Category Archives: Recruits

James TAYLOR

James TAYLOR

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2253), James Taylor was born at Shadforth, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 21 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 5 inches tall, weight 10 stone 4 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

The Wellington Times named ‘James Taylor, son of Mr. Taylor, of the cyanide works’ as one of six recruits who ‘handed in their names’ after a recruiting address was given at Bodangora by Private W. J. Johnson (who was also the Mayor of Auburn), who was accompanying the Coo-ees from Wellington to Orange to assist with the recruiting speeches.[2] He was one of three recruits (along with Leslie J. Sullivan), who were driven in to Wellington the next morning to join the Coo-ees.[3]

James Taylor completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Wellington. It appears that James Taylor decided to go home to Shadforth near Orange first before joining the Coo-ee March, as written on the top of the first page in his service record is that he ‘Presented himself at Orange 25/10/15’.[4]

‘James Taylor (Shadforth)’ was named with three other men in the Leader on 22nd October 1915 as having ‘volunteered to join in the Coo-ee march as recruits when they arrive in Orange’.[5]

He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Orange on 25th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Orange to Millthorpe).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp and joined the 15th reinforcements for the 1st Light Horse Regiment.

The Wellington Times reported that at a farewell held for Trooper Leslie Sullivan at Bodangora on 7th February 1916, he  was entrusted  with a ‘fountain pen in a silver case’ to give to ‘Trooper Jimmy Taylor’, who had enlisted  with him from Bodangora.[6]

The Leader reported that Private Taylor was given a send-off at Shadforth in early February 1916, where ‘he was presented with a gold wristlet watch and a safety razor, as a token of esteem and good will of the people of Shadforth’.[7]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Shadforth, via Lucknow, N.S.W.[8] His next of kin was listed as his father, John Taylor, at the same address.

On 21st March 1916 Trooper Taylor departed Sydney on the HMAT A26 Armadale with the 15th reinforcements for the 1st Light Horse Regiment.

After arriving in Egypt, he was taken on strength of the 1st Light Horse Training Regiment on 24th April 1916 at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 15th May 1916 Trooper Taylor was transferred to the Artillery Details at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 28th May 1916 Gunner Taylor left Alexandria aboard the H.M.T. Corscian, bound for England.  He arrived at Plymouth on 12th June 1916.

On 29th June 1916 Gunner Taylor left Southampton aboard the tansport Duchess of Argyll, bound for France.  He disembarked at Rouen on 30th June 1916. He was attached to the 4th Division Ammunition Sub-Park.  He was transferred to this unit on 15th November 1916.

On 10th August 1917 Gunner Taylor was sent to the 15th Corps Rest Station with an injury to his knee. He re-joined his unit on 15th August 1917.

On 22nd September 1917 Gunner Taylor was granted leave to England. He returned from leave on 4th October 1917.

On 8th October 1917 Gunner Taylor was admitted to the 18th Casualty Clearing Station sick. On 11th October 1917 he was sent to the 7th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France. On 13th October 1917 he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital.

He was discharged from hospital on 10th January 1918, and sent to the Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 24th January 1918 Gunner Taylor marched out to join the 6th Army Brigade Australian Field Artillery Park Section, which he joined on 27th January 1918.

On 27th June 1918 Gunner Taylor was transferred to the 11th Battery  4th Australian Field Artillery Brigade.

On 18th September 1918 Gunner Taylor was wounded in action in France receiving  gunshot wounds to both thighs. He was moved back to an Australian Field Ambulance, then to the 20th Casualty Clearing Station, where he was placed aboard the 3rd Ambulance Train. He was admitted to a hospital at Rouen on 19th September 1918.

On 21st September 1918 he was placed aboard a hospital ship for evacuation to England. On 22nd of September 1918 he was admitted to the Alexandra Hospital at Cosham, England, with a severe gunshot wound to the thigh.

On 12th November 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England. He was discharged from hospital on 15th November 1918, and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England, on 29th November 1918.

On 14th January 1919 Gunner Taylor left England on the H.T. City of York, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 27th February 1919.

He missed a welcome home that had been held for him and another local soldier on Friday evening, 7th March 1919, when ‘many Shadforth and Millthorpe residents assembled at the local railway station’ to greet them both, as he had been ‘detained in hospital’.[9]

The Leader reported on 12th March 1919 that ‘Private James Taylor arrived home last week unexpectedly’, and had been ‘in town’ and ‘looks well, although he says he has had some very rough experiences, but, now that he is back, he has no complaints’.[10]

He was discharged medically unfit on 9th May 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, TAYLOR J

[2] DISTRICT NEWS. Bodangora. (1915, October 21). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved July 15, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143396661

[3] DISTRICT NEWS. Bodangora. (1915, October 21). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved July 15, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143396661

[4] NAA: B2455, TAYLOR J

[5] RECRUITS FOR THE COO-EES (1915, October 22). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842491

[6] SEND OFF TO TROOPER LESLIE SULLIVAN. (1916, February 10). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 7. Retrieved July 29, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143392079

[7] Millthorpe News, Send-off to Pte. J. Taylor’,  Leader, 11 February 1916, p. 6, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117790612

[8] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, James Taylor, HMAT Armadate A26, 21st March 1916.

[9] PRIVATE HUSSELL RODWELL BACK HOME. (1919, March 10). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 6. Retrieved July 29, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117856581

[10] PERSONAL. (1919, March 12). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 3. Retrieved July 29, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117856700

 

Henry PERRY

Henry PERRY

Per his military service record (Depot), Henry Perry was born at Surrey, England.[1]  He gave his age as 44 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 10 stone 10 lbs., with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

‘Perry’ was reported in the Wellington Times on 18th October 1915 as one of the men who enlisted with the Coo-ees at Wellington.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Geurie to Wellington). He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 19th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Dripstone to Stuart Town).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Private Perry’s service record reports that he was absent without leave from 18th December 1915 to 12th January 1916.

He was discharged services no longer required on 12th January 1916.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, PERRY HENRY

[2] HITCHEN’S COO-EES. (1915, October 18). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388424

 

Gordon ROBERTSON

Gordon ROBERTSON

Per his military service record (Depot), Gordon Robertson was born at Gordon, Sydney, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 18 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 5 inches tall, weight 8 stone 10 lbs., with a fresh complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

A telegram from his father J. Robertson filed in his service record gave permission for him to join the expeditionary force.

He undertook a preliminary medical examination at Bathurst on 27th October 1915. He was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Bathurst on 28th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Bathampton to Bathurst). He completed his medical examination at Liverpool on 13th November 1915.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 21st January 1916 Private Robertson was charged with being absent without leave on 3rd and 12th January 1916. He was fined 10 shillings.

On 16th February 1916 Private Roberston went before a civil court charged with riotous behaviour and malicious damage. He was fined £11/2/6.

The Evening News reported on 16th February 1916 that he had been charged at the Sydney Water Police Court with throwing stones at the German Club, and breaking one of the windows, about 8 o’clock the previous Monday night.[2]

He was discharged services no longer required on 13th March 1916.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, ROBERTSON GORDON

[2] “DISGRACE TO AUSTRALIA.” (1916, February 16). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), p. 5. Retrieved July 14, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115845706

 

 

 

 

Albert DENZEL

Albert DENZEL (MM)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4765), Albert Denzel was born at North Parramatta, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 18 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 132 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed to have 4 years universal military training [cadets] and was still serving.

He completed his medical examination on 11th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested by Lieutenant R. Howe at Parramatta (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

A note from his mother Mrs Matilda Denzel in his file gave permission for her son to train in the Imperial Force.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wentworth Street, Parramatta, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs. M. Denzel, at the same address.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 8th March 1916 Private Denzel departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Denzel left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Denzel served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916, then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 13th January 1917 the 45th Battalion was in the front line in the vicinity of  Guedecourt, France, when Private Denzel was charged with neglecting to obey an order of a NCO.[3] He was awarded 28 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 21st September 1917 Private Denzel went to England on leave. On 25th September 1917 he was admitted to hospital with influenza in Edinburgh, Scotland, while still on leave. He returned to the 45th Battalion in France after being discharged from hospital.

On 30th November 1917 Private Denzel was detached for duty with the 12th Australian Light Trench Mortar Battery. He re-joined the 45th Battalion on 27th December 1917 whilst it was training at Haut Allaines, France.[4]

On 19th August 1918 the 45th Battalion was in the front line in the vicinity of Lihons, France, when Private Denzel participated in an action for which he was later awarded the Military Medal.[5]

His recommendation for a Military Medal, dated 24th August 1918, is included in his service record, and reads:

‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty near Lihons S. of Villers-Bretonneux  on 19.8.18. at 8.30 p.m. The enemy attacked the Canadians on our right flank. This soldier was a member of a Lewis Gun team and after the No. 1 had been killed he took charge of the gun. In spite of a heavy M. G. and Art. barrage he daringly occupied a commanding position. Using his gun with remarkable skill and initiative he succeeded in enfilading the enemy’s right flank causing many casualties among the attacking enemy force. The promptness and fine fighting spirit shown by Private Denzel set a splendid example to the men about him.’[6]

On 7th September 1918 Private Denzel went on leave to England. He re-joined the 45th Battalion on 24th September 1918, which on that day moved from Assevillers to Pissy, France.[7]

On 29th December 1918 he was appointed as a temporary driver.

On 23rd February 1919 Temporary Driver Denzel left the 45th Battalion for the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve, to commence his return to Australia.

On 13th March 1919 he departed Le Harve, bound for England. He arrived at Weymouth on 14th March 1919, and marched into the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 12th April 1919 Temporary Driver Denzel was admitted to the 2nd Camp Hospital for observation. He was discharged on 14th April 1919.

Temporary Driver Denzel departed Devonport aboard the Transport China on 1st May 1919.

Notification of Private Denzel’s  Military Medal award was gazetted in Second Supplement No. 31338 to The London Gazette, 13th May 1919 (page 10585), and was also published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, No. 109, dated 15th September, 1919.[8]

He arrived in Sydney on 11th June 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 26th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, DENZEL A

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Albert Denzel, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[3] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/11 – January 1917.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/22– December 1917.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/30 – August 1918.

[6] NAA B2455, DENZEL A

[7] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/31 – September 1918.

[8] NAA B2455, DENZEL A

Alfred Fletcher MCLEAN

Alfred Fletcher McLEAN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2217), Alfred Fletcher Mclean was born at Coonamble, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 19 years and 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farmer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 6 feet tall, weight 12 stone 10 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed that he had previous military service as a Corporal in the 42nd Infantry.

The consent of both his parents was given on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form dated 11th October 1915.

He completed medical on 12th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested at Orange on 12th October 1915.

‘Alfred. F. McLean’ was named in newspaper reports as one of the men who was recruited to join the Coo-ees when they arrived in Orange on 24th October 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

He was charged with being absent without leave on 7th February 1916.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Cranley, Bloomfield, via Orange N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, James Fletcher McLean, at the same address.[3]

‘Trooper Alf McLean’ was presented with a wristlet watch by his friends at Bloomfield, prior to his departure back to duty on Monday night, 6th March 1916, when on final leave.[4]

On 11th March 1916, along with fellow Coo-ee Private Joe Billing, he departed Sydney on the HMAT A67 Orsova with the 15th reinforcements for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

He arrived in Egypt on the 14th April 1916, where he was taken on strength in the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-el-Kebir.

Two days later Trooper McLean was admitted to the Government Hospital at Suez, Egypt, with mumps. He was discharged to duty on 16th April 1916. He re-joined his unit on 19th April 1916.

On 25th May 1916 he transferred to Artillery Details at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 28th May 1916 he left Alexandria on the HMT Corsican, bound for England.  He disembarked at Plymouth on 12th June 1916, for further training.

On 16th July 1916 Gunner McLean was admitted sick to Tidworth Hospital at Bulford, England. He was discharged from hospital on 25th July 1916 to the Australian Artillery Training Depot at Parkhouse, England.

On 26th October 1916 he was transferred to the 22nd Field Artillery Brigade (117th Howitzer Battery) at Boynton, England.

On 31st March 1917 Gunner McLean marched into the Reserve Brigade Australian Artillery at Larkhill from Boynton.

On 11th April 1917 Gunner McLean proceeded overseas to France on a transport from Folkstone, England.  He disembarked in Etaples, France, on 12th April 1917.

He marched out to the 2nd Division Artillery on 17th May 1917.  He was taken on strength of the 2nd Divisional Artillery Column the next day.

On 3rd July 1917 he was sent to the 7th Australian Field Ambulance with a hernia. He was admitted to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station the next day. On 7th July 197 he was admitted to the No. 3 Canadian General Hospital at Boulogne, France.  On 9th July 1917 he was moved to the No. 25 General Hospital at Dannes-Camiers, France.

On 27th July 1917 Gunner McLean was evacuated to England on the Hospital Ship Jan Breydel.

On 28th July 1917 he was admitted to the County of Middlesex War Hospital with a slight hernia.

He was given leave from 17th September 1917 to report to the No. 2 Company Depot at Weymouth, England, on 1st October 1917.

On 26th October 1917 Gunner McLean was promoted to Corporal.

On 27th October 1917 Corporal McLean marched out to No. 3 Company.

On 19th January 1918 he marched out to the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 5th March 1918 he marched out to the Reserve Brigade Australian Artillery at Heytesbury, England.

On 13th March 1918 Corporal McLean proceeded overseas to France from Southampton.

On 14th March 1918 he marched into the Australian General Base Depot at Rouelles, France.

On 17th March 1918 Corporal McLean marched out to the 2nd Divisional Artillery Column.

In a letter he sent home to his parents from France that was published in The Leader on 24th June 1918, he wrote:

“We are so often on the move now and letter writing is very hard. Five or six days ago we were very comfortably quartered in a very fine billet. You cannot imagine how comfortable we were. We have a find spring-mattress for two, stove, plates, dishes, cooking utensils, and what is better still, plenty to cook. As it was evacuated country, there were plenty of fowls and pigeons, with a stray calf or a sheep or two. Then there was plenty of fish in the river, so we used to have fish for breakfast and dinner, varied with pigeons, rabbits, and fowls. Tea  was much the same – and still men will say there is a war going on. You would hardly have believed it had you seen our ‘joint’.  But we are much different at present, as we have a tent to live in made of a tarpaulin, with the ends filled in made of all sorts of things, old blankets and horse rugs, so you can imagine the outward aspect. I have christened it ‘The Rook’s Nest,’ and so it is more ways than one. But we are a gay crowd and as happy as birds in May…  The French are great fighters and real hard cases. You would smile to see their transports. A drover’s turn-out is a king to them. They have bits of rope and wire tied all over the place. But they get there just the same. The French have great faith in the Australians. Since our arrival here more civilians have returned.”[5]

Corporal McLean served with the 2nd Divisional Artillery Column in France until 11th August 1918, when he was wounded in action in the vicinity of Warfusee-Abancourt, with a gunshot wound to his neck.  He was sent to the 5th Australian Field Ambulance. On 12th August 1918 he was admitted to the 55th Casualty Clearing Station. The next day he was admitted to the No. 11 Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France.

On 19th August 1918 he was evacuated to England on a hospital ship. He was admitted to the Bath War Hospital on 20th August 1918.

On 16th September 1918 Corporal McLean was transferred to 3rd Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

On 20th September 1918 he was discharged from hospital to Littlemoor Camp at Weymouth, England.

On 25th October 1918 he went on leave, to report to No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 12th November 1918.

On 13th November 1918 Corporal McLean marched out to No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England. On 26th November he marched into No. 1 Command Depot.

On 14th January 1919 Corporal McLean commenced his return to Australia on H.T. City of York, for medical discharge.

He disembarked in Sydney on 5th March 1919.

He was one of four local soldiers who was welcomed home to Bloomfield on Saturday night, 29th March 1919, where there was ‘a very enthusiastic gathering of about 250 of the residents to do honor to the boys’, with a ‘musical programme contributed to by all the local talent, but largely choruses of school children’, which was ‘followed by speeches of welcome and a first class supper’.[6]

He was discharged medically unfit on 12th September 1919

 

[1] NAA: B2455, MCLEAN A F

[2] RECRUITS FOR THE COO.EES (1915, October 22). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842491

[3] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Alfred Fletcher McLean, HMAT Orsova A67, 11th March 1916.

[4] DEPARTING SOLDIER HONORED. (1916, March 8). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 2. Retrieved July 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117791809

[5] BEFORE AND AFTER THE PUSH. (1918, June 24). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 6. Retrieved July 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article100965641

[6] Personal (1919, April 2). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 1. Retrieved February 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117870410

 

Cecil CONDON

Cecil CONDON

Per his initial military service record (regimental no. 2163A), Cecil Condon was born at Blayney, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 19 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as horsebreaker.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 9 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 7 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair.  His religious denomination was Methodist.   He claimed to have no previous military service.

He signed an initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form, and undertook a preliminary medical examination, at Bathurst on 28th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Bathampton to Bathurst). His mother sent a telegram giving her consent on 29th October 1915. He was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Bathurst on 29th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Bathurst to Yetholme).  He did not complete his medical examination until 13th November 1915 at Liverpool.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 6th Light Horse Regiment.

He was charged with being absent from parade on 9th & 10th February 1916, and forfeited 2 days pay, and was fined 10 shillings.

The Bathurst Times reported on 11th February 1916 that a farewell held for Trooper Condon had been held at the Blayney Masonic Hall, and that after being presented with a gold medal, and a wristlet watch, and a pair of knitted socks, he responded that ‘he was not a gifted speaker, but he hoped to do some good fighting when he reached the front’.[2]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Hill Street, Blayney, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his mother, Mrs Elizabeth Yeo, at the same address.[3]

On 22nd March 1916 Trooper Condon (along with fellow Coo-ees Trooper Kennedy and Trooper Sullivan) departed Sydney on the HMAT A4 Pera, with the 15th reinforcements for the 6th Light Horse Regiment.

After arriving at Suez in Egypt, Trooper Condon marched into the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-el-Kebir on 22nd April 1916.

On 6th July 1916 he was taken on strength of the 2nd Light Horse Double Squadron at Serapeum, Egypt.

On 19th September 1916 Trooper Condon was admitted to the 3rd Field Ambulance suffering from Diarrhoea. He was discharged from hospital and returned to his unit on 22nd September 1916.

On 2nd November 1916 Trooper Condon was transferred to the 4th Australian Camel Regiment at Abbassia, Egypt.

On 7th February 1917 he was transferred to the 18th Company Imperial Camel Corps from the 4th Australian Camel Regiment.

On 13th April 1917 Trooper Condon was detached to the School of Cookery on a course at Ismailia.   He re-joined his unit on 29th April 1917.

Trooper Condon was sent to a rest camp at Port Said on 9th March 1918. He re-joined his unit on 8th April 1918.

On 10th June 1918 Trooper Condon was sent to the School of Instruction at Zietoun.

On 6th July 1918 Trooper Condon returned to his unit from the School of Instruction, and was transferred to the 14th Light Horse Regiment.

Trooper Condon was sent to a rest camp at Port Said on 16th December 1918. He re-joined his unit on 4th April 1919.

Trooper Condon departed Suez, Egypt, aboard the H.T. Dongala on  24th July 1919, commencing his return to Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 28th August 1919.

He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 21st October 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, CONDON C

[2] WESTERN NEWS (1916, February 11). The Bathurst Times (NSW : 1909 – 1925), p. 3. Retrieved April 8, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109937968

[3] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Cecil Condon, HMAT Pera A4, 22nd March 1916.

Thomas Joseph WARD

Thomas Joseph WARD

‘Private Thomas Joseph Ward’. (1919). Australia’s fighting sons of the empire : portraits and biographies of Australians in the Great War. Sydney : B. Jackson & Co, National Library of Australia, http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-35909257

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4914), Thomas Joseph Ward was born at Maclean, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as groom.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 10 stone, with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was recorded as Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no  previous military service.

He completed his medical examination on 11th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested by Lieutenant R. Howe at Parramatta on 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Duke Street, Grafton, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, M. [Michael] Ward, at the same address.[2]

On 8th March 1916, Private Ward, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Ward was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company at Tel-el-Kebir in Egypt (along with fellow Coo-ees Private Brown, Private Richardson, Private Megarrity, Private Lloyd and Private Spicer).

On the 16th of April1916 he was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company.

The Grafton Daily Examiner newspaper reported on 6th June 1916:

‘Private T. J. Ward writes to his mother in Duke-street, dated April 23, that he has arrived in Egypt, after a splendid trip. The young soldier is in perfect health, and expected to leave shortly for France with the Cyclists’ Corps’.[3]

On 6th June 1916 Private Ward departed Alexandra, Egypt, aboard a transport bound for France.  He arrived on Marseilles on 15th June 1916.

After arriving in France, an extract from other letter Private Ward wrote home was published in the Grafton Daily Examiner, on 28th August 1916:

 “I like this country very much, as it puts me in mind of New South Wales, but I think it is a better country. After the war, if I have the luck to get back home again, I will be making my way back here. I am looking forward to having a birthday party in a few days”.[4]

After arriving in France, he was attached to 2nd Anzac Headquarters as an escort. He re-joined the Cyclist Battalion on 28th September 1916.

On 22nd January 1917 Private Ward went on leave to England. He returned to the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 7th February 1917.

On 24th February 1917 Private Ward was charged with Insolence to an NCO. He was awarded 7 days field punishment no. 2.

On 26th March 1917 he was detached for duty with the Anti Aircraft Section 2nd Anzac Headquarters.

He rejoined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 9th June 1917.

On 11th June 1917 Private Ward was sent to a Lewis Gun School. He re-joined the Battalion on 10th September 1917.

On 3rd December 1917 he was detached again to Anti Aircraft Section 2nd Anzac Corps.  He re-joined his Battalion on 9th December 1917. He was then detached again to Anti Aircraft 2nd Anzac Corps on 16th December 1917, then re-joined his Battalion on 23rd December 1917.

On 16th January 1918 Private Ward was transferred to the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion from the 22nd Corps Cyclist Battalion (late 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion) in France.

On 11th April 1918 Private Ward was detached for duty with the Corps Commanders Guard. He rejoined the Battalion on 21st April 1918.

On 24th July 1918 Private Ward went on leave to England. He returned to the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 9th August 1918.

On 18th April 1919 Private Ward departed France to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at Southampton, England, and marched into No. 2 Group on 19th April 1919.

Private Ward appears to have been reluctant to leave England, as on 13th June 1916 he was charged at Sutton Veny with evading embarkation and being absent without leave from 0400 on 4th June 1919 till 1800 on 12th June 1919. He was awarded 21 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 30 days pay.

On 1st July 1919 Private Ward departed England aboard the H.T. Frankfurt bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 20th August 1919.

He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 13th October 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WARD THOMAS JOSEPH

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Thomas Joseph Ward, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[3] PERSONAL. (1916, June 6). Daily Examiner (Grafton, NSW : 1915 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved June 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article194814480

[4] PERSONAL. (1916, August 28). Daily Examiner (Grafton, NSW : 1915 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved June 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article194812650

John Beveridge BUXTON

John Beveridge BUXTON

Private Jack Buxton (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 5/8/1916)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4737), John Beveridge Buxton was born at Five Dock, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 18 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 8 ½ inches tall, weight 135 lbs., with a fair complexion, hazel eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had 4 years universal military training [cadets]as previous military service.

His father George Buxton signed to give his consent on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form dated 11th November 1915.  He completed his medical examination at Parramatta on 11th November 1915.  He was attested by Lieutenant R. Howe at Parramatta on 11th November 1915.

After a successful recruiting meeting the evening before, where 41 men had offered themselves as recruits, the Coo-ees left Parramatta on the morning of 11th November 1915, with an official count of 27 new recruits from that town.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Buxton went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate noted that Buxton was one of the local soldiers leaving with the Coo-ees  ‘for the front’ on 8th March 1916.[3]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was his address was Royal Hotel, Church Street, Parramatta.[4]  His next of kin was listed as his father, G. Buxton, at the same address. (His father George Buxton was the licencee of the Royal Hotel at Parramatta).[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Buxton departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England along with many of the other Coo-ees.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 15th June 1916 a Courts Martial was held at Ismailia, Egypt, where Private Buxton was charged with stealing and receiving stolen goods. Private Buxton was found not guilty of stealing but found guilty of receiving stolen property. He was sentenced to 90 days Field Punishment No. 2 which was commuted to 40 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 17th June 1916 Private Buxton left Alexandria on a transport ship bound for France.  He arrived at  Marseilles on 25th June 1916.

The 5th Division Cyclist Company was moved into the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion upon it’s formation in July 1916.

On 9th October 1916 Private Buxton was detached for duty with the Town Major at Armentieres.  He re-joined his unit on 29th May 1917.

On 27th June 1917 he was detached to the Lewis Gun School.  He re-joined his unit in the field on 23rd July 1917.

The next day, on 24th July 1917, Private Buxton went on leave. He returned to the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 9th August 1917.

On 8th September 1917 he was detached to Lewis Gun Section.  He re-joined his unit from the Lewis Gun Section on 20th September 1917.

On 20th November 1917 he was detached for duty with 3rd Otago Battalion.  He returned to his unit on 25th November 1917.

On 27th November 1917 he was charged with being absent without leave from a 2 a.m.  working party on 25th November 1917. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 16th January 1918 Private Buxton was taken on strength of the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion from 22nd Corps Cyclist Battalion (late 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion).

On 23rd February 1918 Private Buxton was detached for duty with the 7th Field Company Australian Engineers.

On 19th March 1918 he was transferred to the 7th Field Company Australian Engineers in Belgium, and his rank changed from Private to Sapper.

On 13th June 1918 Sapper Buxton was evacuated to the 5th Australian Field Ambulance in France sick. He was sent back to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station. On 15th June 1918 he was admitted to the 55th General Hospital at Boulogne, France. On 19th June 1918 he was transferred to the 10th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne.

On 1st July 1918 he was moved to the Australian Convalescent Depot at Le Harve, France, where he was admitted on 2nd July 1918. He was discharged on 1st August 1918, and marched into the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve.

Sapper Buxton re-joined his unit in France on 8th August 1918.

On 31st August 1918 he was granted leave to England.

Sapper Buxton re-joined the 7th Field Company Engineers in France on 19th September 1918.  Upon returning he was charged with overstaying his leave to England by three days, from 14th to 17th September 1918. He was awarded 12 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 15 days pay.

On 15th December 1918 Sapper Buxton was detached for duty with the 2nd Australian Motor Transport Company.

He re-joined the 7th Field Company Engineers in France on 19th January 1919.

On 12th March 1919 Sapper  Buxton marched in to the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 15th March 1919 he was admitted to the 39th General Hospital at Le Havre with scabies. He was discharged on 20th March 1919.

On 25th March 1919 Sapper Buxton departed France bound for England. The next day he marched into No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

On 15th May 1919 Sapper Buxton departed England aboard the H.T. Ypiringa, bound for Australia.

On 20th May 1919 he was admitted to the ship’s hospital suffering from scabies. He was discharged from the ship’s hospital on 30th May 1919.

Sapper Buxton arrived in Sydney on 6th July 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 11th September 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, BUXTON J B

[2] THE PROCESSION. (1915, November 13). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 11. Retrieved December 30, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86101767

[3] WAR ITEMS.The “Coo-ees” off.  (1916, March 8). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 2. Retrieved March 12, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86082019

[4] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, John Beveridge Buxton, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[5] Parramatta Licensing Court (1913, December 20). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 4. Retrieved June 4, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article85974015

 

Eugene NORRIS

Eugene NORRIS

Pte. Eugene Roland Norris (Cumberland Argus & Fruitgrowers Advocate, 2/2/1918)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4566), Eugene Norris was born at Paddington, Sydney.[1] He gave his age as 21 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as horse driver. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 2 inches tall, weight 9 stone, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He was reported in The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate as being ‘one of the famous Coo-ees who marched through Parramatta’.[2]

His ‘Joined on’ date on his Attestation Paper was 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield). He was attested on 11th November 1915, and completed his medical examination at Liverpool on 13th November 1915. (An anomaly in his service record is that his ‘Oath to be taken by person being enlisted’ section in his Attestation Paper is recorded as having being taken at Liverpool, but the Attesting Officer’s signature is the same as for several of the other Coo-ees who were recorded as having being  attested at Ashfield on the same day).

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

He was one of 14 ‘local boys’ (along with several other Coo-ees) to be presented with a sheepskin vest and a money belt, and a wristlet watch, at a farewell held in the Elite Hall in Guildford on Thursday 9th December 1915.[3]

On 19th December 1915 Private Norris was charged with being absent without leave from 15th December 1915 until 19th December 1915. He was fined 1 pound.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Albert Parade, Guildford, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, W. [William] Norris, at the same address.[4]

On 16th February 1916 Private Norris was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas on active service, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 with the 14th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

He arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Battalion in Egypt.

On 12th May 1916 he was transferred to the 57th Battalion.

On 17th June 1916 Private Norris left Alexandria aboard H.T. Kalyan bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 24th June 1916.

Private Norris served with the 57th Battalion on the Western Front in France until 14th October 1916 Private Norris was sent to the 1st Casualty Clearing Station with keloid on his heel. The 57th Battalion had marched to billets at Estaires, France, the day before, and it was noted in the Battalion diary that ‘a few men suffered from slightly blistered feet due chiefly to new boots’.[5] On the 16th of October 1916 he was placed aboard a hospital train and evacuated to the 35th General Hospital at Calais, France.

He was discharged from hospital on 16th November 1916, and sent to the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 4th December 1916 Private Norris was charged with being absent without leave from the No. 1 Training Camp parade on 2nd December 1916, when the 57th Battalion was at Mametz, France. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2. On 10th December 1916 Private Norris re-joined the 57th Battalion camped at Montauban, France.[6]

On 20th August 1917 Private Norris was granted leave to England. He re-joined the 57th Battalion on 3rd September 1917.

On 27th October 1917 the 57th Battalion was being relieved by the 28th Battalion at Broodseinde, Belgium, when the Germans launched a gas barrage.[7] Private Norris was wounded by gas and a shrapnel wound to his thigh. He was moved back to the 3rd Canadian Casualty Clearing Station. On 28th October 1917 he was placed aboard the 32nd Ambulance Train and admitted to the 55th General Hospital at Boulogne, France.

On 5th November 1917 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Princess Elizabeth for evacuation to England. On 6th November 1917 he was admitted to the Colchester Military Hospital.

On 14th November 1917 he was transferred to Suffolk Hospital in Bury St Edmonds.

On 30th November 1917 he was granted leave to report to the No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England, on 14th December 1917.

On 2nd February 1918 Private Norris marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 21st February 1918 he departed Southampton bound for France. On 22nd February 1918 he marched into the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

He re-joined the 57th Battalion in France on 28th February 1918.

On 11th November 1918 Private Norris was granted leave to England.

On 25th November 1918 whilst still on leave he was admitted to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England sick. He was discharged on 12th December 1918 and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 15th December 1918.

He reported back from leave two days late on 17th December 1918 and was dealt with by the Orderly Room.

Private Norris departed England on 2nd January 1919 for return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Karmala, with the note ‘for influenza’.

He arrived in Australia on 22nd February 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 4th May 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, NORRIS EUGENE

[2] OF “THE BOYS.” (1917, November 17). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 11. Retrieved April 9, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86087988

[3] FAREWELLING. (1915, December 11). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 5. Retrieved April 23, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86106306

[4] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Eugene Norris, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/R1754195

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/74 – 57th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/74/9 – October 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/74 – 57th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/74/11 – December 1916.

[7] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/74 – 57th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/74/21 – October 1917.

Richard Charles WHEELER

Richard Charles WHEELER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5777), ‘Richard Charlie Wheeler’, as he signed his name, was born at Hammersmith, London, England.[1]  (His name is also recorded as Richard Charles Wheeler, and Charles Richard Wheeler, on various documents in his service record). He gave his age as 18 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 9 stone, with a dark complexion, bluish grey eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination on 8th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Gilgandra on 9th October 1915, before the commencement of the Coo-ee March.

‘Charles R. Wheeler’ was reported in The Farmer and Settler as one of the first 25 recruits to enlist at Gilgandra to join the Coo-ee March.[2]

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll, his name is recorded as ‘Charles Richard Wheeler’, and his address at time of enrolment was not recorded. His next of kin was recorded as his father, C. [Charles] Wheeler, 5 River Terrace, Crisp Road, Hammersmith, London, England.[3]

On 3rd May 1916 Private Wheeler departed Sydney on the HMAT A46 Clan McGillivray, along with fellow Coo-ees Private Herringe, Private Saunders and Private Keating, as part of the 18th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

He arrived in Egypt in June 1916.

On 6th August 1916 Private Wheeler departed Egypt bound for England aboard the Transport Megantic.

Upon arrival in England he marched into the 4th Training Battalion at Rollerstone, England.

On 7th October 1916 Private Wheeler was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 5th October 1916 until noon on 7th October 1916. He was awarded 48 hours detention, and fined 3 days pay.

On 14th October 1916 Private Wheeler departed England bound for France. He marched into the 4th Australian Infantry Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, later that day.

On 30th October 1916 Private Wheeler was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion when it was training at Vauchelles, France.[4]

On 1st February 1917 Private Wheeler reported sick. He was back with the Battalion on 3rd February 1917.

On 28th July 1917 Private Wheeler was charged with conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline by writing disrespectfully of his Superior Officer. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 18th September 1917 Private Wheeler went to England on leave. He re-joined the Battalion on 29th September 1917.

On 25th October 1917 Private Wheeler was detached to duty at the 3rd Australian General Hospital at Abbeyville, France.

On 13th April 1918 Private Wheeler was charged with neglect of duty in that he was absent from parade on the night of 11th February 1918. He was awarded 7 days field Punishment No. 2.

On 3rd May 1918 Private Wheeler was charged with whilst on active service drunkeness in Abbeville on 1st May 1918. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 26th June 1918 Private Wheeler was hospitalised with conjunctivitis. He was discharged on 30th June 1918.

On 14th July 1918 Private Wheeler was hospitalised with gastritis. He was discharged on 28th July 1918.

On 7th August 1918 Private Wheeler marched into the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 14th August 1918 he marched out to re-join the 13th Battalion. He re-joined the Battalion on 19th August 1918 when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Harbonnieres, France.[5]

On 27th September 1918 Private Wheeler went to England on leave. He returned to his unit from leave in France on 18th October 1918.

On 24th October 1918 he was charged  with overstaying leave in London from 0730 on the 12th of October 1918 till 0730 on the 17th of October 1918. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 19 days pay.

On 3rd April 1919 Private Wheeler marched out to England and reported to the 1st Training Brigade at Weymouth, England.

On 22nd May 1919 Private Wheeler was charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 15th May 1919 until 2200 on 16th May 1919. He was awarded 3 days confined to camp, and fined 1 days pay.

On 9th July 1919 ‘Richard Charles Wheeler’ married 19 year old Rose Gertrude Winifred Parsons at the All Soul’s Parish Church of Harlesden, England.

On 18th August 1919 Private Wheeler was charged with being absent without leave from 0900 on 4th August 1919 until 2400 on 5th August 1919. He was admonished and fined 2 days pay.

His service record records that Private Wheeler and his wife embarked for Australia on 8th October 1919 aboard the H.T. Benalla.

 They arrived in Australia on 29th November 1919.

He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 7th February 1920.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WHEELER RICHARD CHARLIE

[2] THE ROUTE MARCH (1915, October 12). The Farmer and Settler (Sydney, NSW : 1906 – 1955), p. 3. Retrieved April 14, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116668904

[3] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, ‘Charles Richard Wheeler’, HMAT Clan McGillivray A46, 3rd May 1916.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, October 1916.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, August 1918.