Tag Archives: Orange recruits

John WILLIAMS

John WILLIAMS

Per his military service record (Depot), John Williams was born at Orange, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 33 years and 4 months, his marital status as widower, and his occupation as miner. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 8 stone 12 lbs., with a dark complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

John Williams left from Gilgandra to join the Coo-ees.

Dr Henry Peet signed the ‘Preliminary Medical Examination section’ on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form (addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Dubbo) at Gilgandra on 22nd October 1915. John Williams listed his postal address on this form as ‘Gilgandra’.

A. H. Miller, Organising Secretary of the Gilgandra-Sydney route march, from the Gilgandra Recruiting Association, sent a telegram from Gilgandra to Major Wynne, Gilgandra Coo-ees, Orange, stating that he ‘forgot [to] send Williams medical papers sending today mail to Orange’.[2]

John Williams completed his medical examination, and was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas, at Orange on 24th October 1915 (while the Coo-ees had a rest day at Orange).

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 14th December 1915 Private Williams was charged with being absent without leave from 8th December 1915 till 14th December 1915. He was recommended to be discharged.

On 15th December 1915 Private Williams was discharged not likely to become an efficient soldier.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WILLIAMS J

[2] Telegram from A. H. Miller to Captain Wynne October 1915 in: Alex Halden (Joe) Miller papers mainly relating to the Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March, New South Wales, 1912-1921, 1939. Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March correspondence and papers, 1915-1939.

James TAYLOR

James TAYLOR

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2253), James Taylor was born at Shadforth, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 21 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 5 inches tall, weight 10 stone 4 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

The Wellington Times named ‘James Taylor, son of Mr. Taylor, of the cyanide works’ as one of six recruits who ‘handed in their names’ after a recruiting address was given at Bodangora by Private W. J. Johnson (who was also the Mayor of Auburn), who was accompanying the Coo-ees from Wellington to Orange to assist with the recruiting speeches.[2] He was one of three recruits (along with Leslie J. Sullivan), who were driven in to Wellington the next morning to join the Coo-ees.[3]

James Taylor completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Wellington. It appears that James Taylor decided to go home to Shadforth near Orange first before joining the Coo-ee March, as written on the top of the first page in his service record is that he ‘Presented himself at Orange 25/10/15’.[4]

‘James Taylor (Shadforth)’ was named with three other men in the Leader on 22nd October 1915 as having ‘volunteered to join in the Coo-ee march as recruits when they arrive in Orange’.[5]

He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Orange on 25th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Orange to Millthorpe).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp and joined the 15th reinforcements for the 1st Light Horse Regiment.

The Wellington Times reported that at a farewell held for Trooper Leslie Sullivan at Bodangora on 7th February 1916, he  was entrusted  with a ‘fountain pen in a silver case’ to give to ‘Trooper Jimmy Taylor’, who had enlisted  with him from Bodangora.[6]

The Leader reported that Private Taylor was given a send-off at Shadforth in early February 1916, where ‘he was presented with a gold wristlet watch and a safety razor, as a token of esteem and good will of the people of Shadforth’.[7]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Shadforth, via Lucknow, N.S.W.[8] His next of kin was listed as his father, John Taylor, at the same address.

On 21st March 1916 Trooper Taylor departed Sydney on the HMAT A26 Armadale with the 15th reinforcements for the 1st Light Horse Regiment.

After arriving in Egypt, he was taken on strength of the 1st Light Horse Training Regiment on 24th April 1916 at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 15th May 1916 Trooper Taylor was transferred to the Artillery Details at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 28th May 1916 Gunner Taylor left Alexandria aboard the H.M.T. Corscian, bound for England.  He arrived at Plymouth on 12th June 1916.

On 29th June 1916 Gunner Taylor left Southampton aboard the tansport Duchess of Argyll, bound for France.  He disembarked at Rouen on 30th June 1916. He was attached to the 4th Division Ammunition Sub-Park.  He was transferred to this unit on 15th November 1916.

On 10th August 1917 Gunner Taylor was sent to the 15th Corps Rest Station with an injury to his knee. He re-joined his unit on 15th August 1917.

On 22nd September 1917 Gunner Taylor was granted leave to England. He returned from leave on 4th October 1917.

On 8th October 1917 Gunner Taylor was admitted to the 18th Casualty Clearing Station sick. On 11th October 1917 he was sent to the 7th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France. On 13th October 1917 he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital.

He was discharged from hospital on 10th January 1918, and sent to the Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 24th January 1918 Gunner Taylor marched out to join the 6th Army Brigade Australian Field Artillery Park Section, which he joined on 27th January 1918.

On 27th June 1918 Gunner Taylor was transferred to the 11th Battery  4th Australian Field Artillery Brigade.

On 18th September 1918 Gunner Taylor was wounded in action in France receiving  gunshot wounds to both thighs. He was moved back to an Australian Field Ambulance, then to the 20th Casualty Clearing Station, where he was placed aboard the 3rd Ambulance Train. He was admitted to a hospital at Rouen on 19th September 1918.

On 21st September 1918 he was placed aboard a hospital ship for evacuation to England. On 22nd of September 1918 he was admitted to the Alexandra Hospital at Cosham, England, with a severe gunshot wound to the thigh.

On 12th November 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England. He was discharged from hospital on 15th November 1918, and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England, on 29th November 1918.

On 14th January 1919 Gunner Taylor left England on the H.T. City of York, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 27th February 1919.

He missed a welcome home that had been held for him and another local soldier on Friday evening, 7th March 1919, when ‘many Shadforth and Millthorpe residents assembled at the local railway station’ to greet them both, as he had been ‘detained in hospital’.[9]

The Leader reported on 12th March 1919 that ‘Private James Taylor arrived home last week unexpectedly’, and had been ‘in town’ and ‘looks well, although he says he has had some very rough experiences, but, now that he is back, he has no complaints’.[10]

He was discharged medically unfit on 9th May 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, TAYLOR J

[2] DISTRICT NEWS. Bodangora. (1915, October 21). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved July 15, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143396661

[3] DISTRICT NEWS. Bodangora. (1915, October 21). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved July 15, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143396661

[4] NAA: B2455, TAYLOR J

[5] RECRUITS FOR THE COO-EES (1915, October 22). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842491

[6] SEND OFF TO TROOPER LESLIE SULLIVAN. (1916, February 10). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 7. Retrieved July 29, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143392079

[7] Millthorpe News, Send-off to Pte. J. Taylor’,  Leader, 11 February 1916, p. 6, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117790612

[8] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, James Taylor, HMAT Armadate A26, 21st March 1916.

[9] PRIVATE HUSSELL RODWELL BACK HOME. (1919, March 10). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 6. Retrieved July 29, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117856581

[10] PERSONAL. (1919, March 12). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 3. Retrieved July 29, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117856700

 

Alfred Fletcher MCLEAN

Alfred Fletcher McLEAN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2217), Alfred Fletcher Mclean was born at Coonamble, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 19 years and 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farmer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 6 feet tall, weight 12 stone 10 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed that he had previous military service as a Corporal in the 42nd Infantry.

The consent of both his parents was given on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form dated 11th October 1915.

He completed medical on 12th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested at Orange on 12th October 1915.

‘Alfred. F. McLean’ was named in newspaper reports as one of the men who was recruited to join the Coo-ees when they arrived in Orange on 24th October 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

He was charged with being absent without leave on 7th February 1916.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Cranley, Bloomfield, via Orange N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, James Fletcher McLean, at the same address.[3]

‘Trooper Alf McLean’ was presented with a wristlet watch by his friends at Bloomfield, prior to his departure back to duty on Monday night, 6th March 1916, when on final leave.[4]

On 11th March 1916, along with fellow Coo-ee Private Joe Billing, he departed Sydney on the HMAT A67 Orsova with the 15th reinforcements for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

He arrived in Egypt on the 14th April 1916, where he was taken on strength in the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-el-Kebir.

Two days later Trooper McLean was admitted to the Government Hospital at Suez, Egypt, with mumps. He was discharged to duty on 16th April 1916. He re-joined his unit on 19th April 1916.

On 25th May 1916 he transferred to Artillery Details at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 28th May 1916 he left Alexandria on the HMT Corsican, bound for England.  He disembarked at Plymouth on 12th June 1916, for further training.

On 16th July 1916 Gunner McLean was admitted sick to Tidworth Hospital at Bulford, England. He was discharged from hospital on 25th July 1916 to the Australian Artillery Training Depot at Parkhouse, England.

On 26th October 1916 he was transferred to the 22nd Field Artillery Brigade (117th Howitzer Battery) at Boynton, England.

On 31st March 1917 Gunner McLean marched into the Reserve Brigade Australian Artillery at Larkhill from Boynton.

On 11th April 1917 Gunner McLean proceeded overseas to France on a transport from Folkstone, England.  He disembarked in Etaples, France, on 12th April 1917.

He marched out to the 2nd Division Artillery on 17th May 1917.  He was taken on strength of the 2nd Divisional Artillery Column the next day.

On 3rd July 1917 he was sent to the 7th Australian Field Ambulance with a hernia. He was admitted to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station the next day. On 7th July 197 he was admitted to the No. 3 Canadian General Hospital at Boulogne, France.  On 9th July 1917 he was moved to the No. 25 General Hospital at Dannes-Camiers, France.

On 27th July 1917 Gunner McLean was evacuated to England on the Hospital Ship Jan Breydel.

On 28th July 1917 he was admitted to the County of Middlesex War Hospital with a slight hernia.

He was given leave from 17th September 1917 to report to the No. 2 Company Depot at Weymouth, England, on 1st October 1917.

On 26th October 1917 Gunner McLean was promoted to Corporal.

On 27th October 1917 Corporal McLean marched out to No. 3 Company.

On 19th January 1918 he marched out to the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 5th March 1918 he marched out to the Reserve Brigade Australian Artillery at Heytesbury, England.

On 13th March 1918 Corporal McLean proceeded overseas to France from Southampton.

On 14th March 1918 he marched into the Australian General Base Depot at Rouelles, France.

On 17th March 1918 Corporal McLean marched out to the 2nd Divisional Artillery Column.

In a letter he sent home to his parents from France that was published in The Leader on 24th June 1918, he wrote:

“We are so often on the move now and letter writing is very hard. Five or six days ago we were very comfortably quartered in a very fine billet. You cannot imagine how comfortable we were. We have a find spring-mattress for two, stove, plates, dishes, cooking utensils, and what is better still, plenty to cook. As it was evacuated country, there were plenty of fowls and pigeons, with a stray calf or a sheep or two. Then there was plenty of fish in the river, so we used to have fish for breakfast and dinner, varied with pigeons, rabbits, and fowls. Tea  was much the same – and still men will say there is a war going on. You would hardly have believed it had you seen our ‘joint’.  But we are much different at present, as we have a tent to live in made of a tarpaulin, with the ends filled in made of all sorts of things, old blankets and horse rugs, so you can imagine the outward aspect. I have christened it ‘The Rook’s Nest,’ and so it is more ways than one. But we are a gay crowd and as happy as birds in May…  The French are great fighters and real hard cases. You would smile to see their transports. A drover’s turn-out is a king to them. They have bits of rope and wire tied all over the place. But they get there just the same. The French have great faith in the Australians. Since our arrival here more civilians have returned.”[5]

Corporal McLean served with the 2nd Divisional Artillery Column in France until 11th August 1918, when he was wounded in action in the vicinity of Warfusee-Abancourt, with a gunshot wound to his neck.  He was sent to the 5th Australian Field Ambulance. On 12th August 1918 he was admitted to the 55th Casualty Clearing Station. The next day he was admitted to the No. 11 Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France.

On 19th August 1918 he was evacuated to England on a hospital ship. He was admitted to the Bath War Hospital on 20th August 1918.

On 16th September 1918 Corporal McLean was transferred to 3rd Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

On 20th September 1918 he was discharged from hospital to Littlemoor Camp at Weymouth, England.

On 25th October 1918 he went on leave, to report to No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 12th November 1918.

On 13th November 1918 Corporal McLean marched out to No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England. On 26th November he marched into No. 1 Command Depot.

On 14th January 1919 Corporal McLean commenced his return to Australia on H.T. City of York, for medical discharge.

He disembarked in Sydney on 5th March 1919.

He was one of four local soldiers who was welcomed home to Bloomfield on Saturday night, 29th March 1919, where there was ‘a very enthusiastic gathering of about 250 of the residents to do honor to the boys’, with a ‘musical programme contributed to by all the local talent, but largely choruses of school children’, which was ‘followed by speeches of welcome and a first class supper’.[6]

He was discharged medically unfit on 12th September 1919

 

[1] NAA: B2455, MCLEAN A F

[2] RECRUITS FOR THE COO.EES (1915, October 22). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842491

[3] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Alfred Fletcher McLean, HMAT Orsova A67, 11th March 1916.

[4] DEPARTING SOLDIER HONORED. (1916, March 8). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 2. Retrieved July 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117791809

[5] BEFORE AND AFTER THE PUSH. (1918, June 24). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 6. Retrieved July 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article100965641

[6] Personal (1919, April 2). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 1. Retrieved February 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117870410

 

Arthur GILCHRIST

Arthur GILCHRIST

Per his initial military service record (Depot), Arthur Gilchrist was born at Millthorpe, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 38 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 9 1/8 inches tall, weight 9 stone, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed that he had no previous military service, and had been rejected in the past at Gilgandra and Orange for his eyesight and chest measurement.

His next of kin on his Attestation paper was listed as his mother, Mrs Mary Gilchrist, McLachlan Street, Orange N.S.W.  His older Brother Robert Gilchrist had joined the Coo-ees at Euchareena on 20th October 1915.

Arthur Gilchrist was listed in The Leader as one of the men who were recruited at Orange to join the Coo-ees.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Orange on 24th October 1915, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Orange the same day (the day the Coo-ees rested at Orange).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 17th of November 1915 Private Gilchrist went before a medical board at Liverpool Camp where he was found to have rheumatism. He was recommended to be discharged.

On 29th November 1915 he was discharged from the A.I.F.  medically unfit.

A separate military service record (regimental no. N18113) shows that on 1st April 1916 he re-enlisted in the A.I.F. under the name Arthur Joseph Gilchrist at Gulargambone, N.S.W.[3]

He was sent to the Dubbo Military Camp on 3rd April 1916.

On 3rd May 1916 he was sent to the 54th Depot Battalion at Bathurst Camp.

On 23rd May 1916 Private Gilchrist went before a medical board at Bathurst where he was found to have chronic rheumatism. He was recommended to be discharged.

On 6th June 1916 Private Gilchrist was discharged from the A.I.F. for the second time medically unfit.

It appears that he attempted to re-enlist in the A.I.F. on yet another occasion. According to an article in The Leader, Arthur J. Gilchrist was recorded as one of 22 men rejected as unfit who had tried to enlist in the A.I.F. at the Orange Drill Hall in early 1917.[4]

[1] NAA: B2455, GILCHRIST A

[2] THE RECRUITS. (1915, October 25). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 4. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

[3] NAA: B2455, GILCHRIST A J

[4] RECRUITING. (1917, March 26). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 6. Retrieved February 25, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117824292

 

Joseph Thomas BRUCE

Joseph Thomas BRUCE

Per his military service record (Depot), Joseph Thomas Bruce was born at Corowa, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 23 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as shearer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 158 lbs., with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 22nd October 1915.  He then caught up with the Coo-ees, and was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Orange on 24th October 1915.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as his mother, Mrs E. Bruce, Harris Street, Sydney.

On 6th November 1915 at Katoomba (the day the Coo-ees marched from Katoomba to Lawson), Private Bruce was charged by Captain A. C. Eade with drunkenness and using offensive language. Captain Hitchen was the witness to the offences. Private Bruce was fined 70 shillings.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 3rd December 1915 Private Bruce was charged with being absent without leave and drunkenness, and was discharged from the A.I.F. not likely to become an efficient soldier.

[1] NAA: B2455, BRUCE J T

George Allen LLOYD

George Allen LLOYD

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4828), George Allen Lloyd was born at Forbes, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 9 stone 13 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed medical on 15th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested at Orange on 18th  October 1915.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

‘G. A. Lloyd ’was named in newspaper reports as one of the men who was recruited by the local Recruiting Association to join the Coo-ees when they arrived in Orange on 24th October 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 2nd February 1916 Private Llloyd was charged with using bad language on parade. He was fined 5 shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was North Hill, Forbes, N.S.W. [3] His next of kin is listed as his father, G. A. Lloyd, North Hill, Forbes, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Lloyd departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Lloyd was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company (along with fellow Coo-ees Private Richardson, Private Megarrity, and Private Spicer).

On 17th June 1916 Private Lloyd left Alexandria aboard the Transport Manitou bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 25th June 1916.

On 3rd December 1916 Private Llloyd was sent to the 1st New Zealand Field Ambulance sick with Influenza. He was transferred to the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station later that day. On 5th December 1916 he was placed aboard a hospital train and moved back to the 32nd Stationary Hospital at Wimereux, France, being admitted on 6th December 1916.

On 24th December 1916 he was transferred to the 1st Convalescent Depot at Boulogne. He was discharged on 2nd of January 1917 and sent to the Australian General Base Depot at Etaples, France.

He re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 17th January 1917.

On 23rd January 1917 Private Lloyd was sent to the 3rd New Zealand Field Ambulance sick with Influenza. On 26th January 1917 he was moved back to the 2nd New Zealand Division Rest Station. He was discharged and re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 18th February 1917.

On 18th May 1917 Private Lloyd was detached for duty with the 2nd ANZAC Anti-aircraft section. He re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion from detachment on 25th May 1917.

On 20th July Private Lloyd went on leave, returning to his unit on 1st August 1917.

On 3rd August 1917 Private Lloyd was sent sick to the New Zealand Stationary Hospital at Hazebrouck, France. On 9th August 1917 he was admitted to the 7th Canadian Stationary Hospital at St Omer, France, suffering from nervous indigestion. On 12th August 1917 he was transferred to the 7th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France. On 16th August 1917 he was transferred to the 10th Convalescent Depot.

He was discharged on 2nd October 1917 and sent to the Australian General Base Depot at Le Havre. He re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 11th October 1917.

On 6th November 1917 Private Lloyd was sent to the Indian Cavalry Field Ambulance with a sprained left knee and a wound to the fifth finger on his right hand, caused by a fall from a cycle. He was moved back to the 59th Casualty Clearing Station later that day.

On 23rd November 1917 he was admitted to the 26th General Hospital. On 27th November 1917 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Stad Antwerpen for evacuation to England with synovitis of the left knee, and a wound to the right hand. He was admitted to the 16th Canadian General Hospital (Ontario Military Hospital), in England.

On 7th January 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England. He was discharged on 18th January 1918 and sent to the No.3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 15th February 1918 Private Lloyd was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 7th February 1918 until 1740 on 13th February 1918. The charge was dismissed as Private Lloyd produced a Medical Certificate.

On 24th February 1918 Private Lloyd was admitted to the Brigade Hospital suffering Influenza. He was discharged on 23rd March 1918.

On 21st May 1918 Private Lloyd marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 5th June 1918 he departed Southampton bound for France. He marched into the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve on 6th June 1918.

He was taken on strength from 2nd Anzac Corps Cyclist Battalion ex hospital and ex Base Depot to the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion on 10th June 1918.

On 10th November 1918 Private Lloyd went on leave to England. He re-joined the Cyclist Battalion on 8th December 1918.

On 26th March 1919 at Charleroi, Belgium, Private Lloyd was charged with gambling and being in possession of loaded firearms. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No.2 and fined 7 days pay.

On 13th April 1919 Private Lloyd marched into the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve, France, to commence his return to Australia.

He departed France on 18th April 1919. He arrived at Southampton, England, on 19th April 1919, and marched into the No. 2 Group.

On 29th May 1919 at Sutton Veny, England, Private Lloyd was charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 16th May 1919 until 1600 on 23rd May 1919. He was fined 21 days pay.

On 5th June 1919 Private Lloyd departed Devonport, England, aboard the H.T. Mahia bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 20th July 1919.  He was discharged medically unfit on 13th September 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, LLOYD GEORGE ALLEN

[2] THE RECRUITS. (1915, October 25). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 4. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599 ; “THE COO-EES.” (1915, October 23). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), p. 6. Retrieved January 1, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115269403

[3] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, George Allen Lloyd, 4828.

Robert John SLOEY

Robert John SLOEY

Per his military service record (Depot), Robert John Sloey was born in Wellington, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as book-keeper.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 7 3/8 inches tall, weight 10 stone 7 lbs., with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed he had previous service in the Byrock Rifle Club, and that he had been rejected as unfit for military service once before due to eyesight.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as Mr and Mrs R. J. Sloey, Maxwell Street, Wellington N.S.W.

He appears to have joined the Coo-ee March somewhere between Wellington and Molong. ‘R. J. Sloey’ was reported in the Molong Express and Western District Advertiser on 23rd October 1915 as being one of six recruits that joined the Coo-ee March ‘on the road from Wellington’.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Orange on 24th October 1915.  He was attested at by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Orange on 24th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees rested at Orange).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

His Statement of Service records that on 9th January 1916 Private Sloey deserted from Liverpool Camp. A warrant was issued for his arrest on 16th February 1916. The warrant was withdrawn on 30th January 1919.

 

[1]NAA: B2455, SLOEY ROBERT JOHN

[2] The “Coo-ees” Come. (1915, October 23). Molong Express and Western District Advertiser (NSW : 1887 – 1954), p. 10. Retrieved August 11, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article101050484

 

 

William John SHANNON

William John SHANNON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4889), William John Shannon was born at Glasgow, Scotland.[1]  He gave his age as 24 years and 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 4 1/8 inches tall, weight 8 stone 12 lbs., with a dark complexion, hazel eyes, and black hair.  His religious denomination was recorded as Presbyterian.  He claimed that he had 3 years previous military service in the Royal Field Artillery in Scotland.

William Shannon was listed in The Leader as one of the men who were recruited at Orange to join the Coo-ees’.[2]  He completed his medical examination on 24th October at Orange, and was attested by Captain T. Nicholas at Orange on 24th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 27th January 1915 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp for 11 days.  He was fined 11 days pay.

Private Shannon was involved in hearing at the Central Police Court on 25th January 1916, followed by a court case on 6th March 1916 at the Darlinghurst Quarter Sessions, in which another Coo-ee was charged with, and subsequently found guilty of, having assaulted fellow Coo-ee Daniel Lynch at Central Railway Station about midnight on January 16th 1916, and robbed him of two pounds.[3]  A witness testified that ‘Shannon, who was the worse for drink, took no part in the robbery’, and he was subsequently discharged.[4]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was left blank, and his next of kin is listed as his father, S. [Samuel] Shannon, Lane Street, off Chloride Street, Broken Hill, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916, Private Shannon, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Cannon was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 10th May 1916 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from 1600 on 29th April 1916 until 0600 on 2nd May 1916.  He was awarded 96 hours Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 7 days pay.

On 4th June 1916 Private Shannon left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 25th August 1916 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from 1400 until 2030 on 24th August 1916 and Disobedience of Orders.  He was awarded 21 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 22 days pay.

On 30th May 1917 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from 2045 Parade and from 2100 Tattoo Roll Call until 2200 on 27th May 1917.  He was fined 2 days pay.

Two days later on 1st June 1917 Private Shannon was promoted to Lance Corporal.

On 29th July 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon was detached to the 2nd Army rest Camp.  He re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion on13th August 1917.

On 24th August 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon went on leave.  He re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion from leave on 7th September 1917.

On 4th December 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon was detached to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France, to go before a Medical Board.

On 10th December 1917 he went before the Medical Board and was classified as Permanent Base due to debility.

On 19th December 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon was transferred to England for permanent base duties.

On 20th December 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon marched into No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 10th January 1918 he marched into the 1st Training Brigade/Pioneer Training Battalion at Sutton Veny, England.

On 27th May 1918 Lance Corporal Shannon was sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 7th June 1918 Lance Corporal Shannon departed England on H.M.A.T. Essex to return to Australia for medical discharge (Hallux Valgus) [Bunion].

He arrived in Australia on 1st August 1918, and was discharged medically unfit on 3rd September 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, SHANNON WILLIAM JOHN

[2] ‘The Recruits’, Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 4. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

[3] ‘Soldier Charged’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 January 1916, p. 6. Retrieved March 1, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28782852

[4] ‘Soldier Charged’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 January 1916, p. 6. Retrieved March 1, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28782852

William COLLYER

William COLLYER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4752), William Collyer was born at Wongarbon, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 19 years and 3 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as butcher. (He was the son of Thomas William Collyer and Flora Collyer). [2] His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 10 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He completed his certificate of medical examination on the 17th October 1915 at Wellington (while the Coo-ees were at Wellington). However he was not attested until 24th October 1915 by Captain Nicholas at Orange. A note at the top of his Attestation Paper reads ‘Presented himself 24/10/1915 with form signed by Metcalfe [the doctor at Wellington]. Sworn in 24/10/15’.

His Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form, addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Wellington, was signed by both his father Thomas Collyer and stepmother Ellen Collyer, so perhaps he had travelled back to Wongarbon to get the consent of his parents, before he caught up with the Coo-ees at Orange. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

‘William Colyer’ [sic] was listed in The Leader as one of the men who were recruited at Orange to join the Coo-ees.[3]

‘W. Collyer’ was listed as one of the ‘Wongarbon boys’ with the Coo-ees in The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate.[4]

After completing the remainder of the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The Wellington Times reported that Privates W. Collyer and H. Saunders  were presented with wristlet watches by the residents of Wongarbon at a farewell social while they  were home on final leave on 3rd March 1916.[5]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wongarbon, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, T. Collyer, Wongarbon, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Collyer, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Tel-el-Kebir, and was taken on strength of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.  He was also mustered as a Driver.

On 25th May 1916 he was transferred to the Artillery Training Depot at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 28th May 1916 Gunner Collyer left Alexandria on the HMT Corsican, bound for England.  He disembarked at Plymouth on 12th June 1916, for further training.

On 30th July 1916 Gunner Collyer departed England bound for France.

On 9th August 1916 Gunner Collyer was taken on strength of the 4th Division Ammunition Column in France, while it was training in the vicinity of the village of Acquin, 9 miles from St. Omer.

On 14th October 1916 his rank was changed to Driver.

On 7th March 1917 Driver Collyer’s rank was changed back to Gunner.

On 29th November 1917 Gunner Collyer was granted leave to England.

On 13th December 1917 whilst on leave in England, he was admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England, sick.  He was discharged from Hospital on 1st April 1918.

On 2nd April 1918 he marched into to No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny in England.

On 24th May 1918 he marched out to the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 3rd July 1918 Gunner Collyer departed Southampton for return to Le Havre, France.

Gunner Collyer rejoined his unit on 14th July 1918, when the 4th Division Ammunition Column was at Frenchencourt, France.

On 9th March 1919 Gunner Collyer left his unit, and marched into the Base Depot at Le Harve to commence his return to Australia. He departed France on 31st March 1919.

He arrived at Weymouth, England, on 1st April 1919, where he marched into the No. 4 Command Depot.

On 12th May 1919 Gunner Collyer departed England for return to Australia aboard the HT Port Napier (along with Wongarbon Coo-ee Driver Saunders).

Gunner Collyer arrived in Sydney on 5th July 1919, and was discharged on the 19th of August 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, COLLYER W

[2] NSW Birth Registration 35916/1896 William A Collyer.

[3] ‘The Recruits’, Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 4. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

[4] ‘Our Soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate,  29 October 1915, p. 4. Retrieved January 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601711

[5] ‘At Wongarbon’, Wellington Times,  9 March 1916, p. 6. Retrieved November 29, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143398796

 

Leslie Reginald ANLEZARK

Leslie Reginald ANLEZARK

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4726), Leslie Reginald Anlezark was born at Orange, N.S.W. He gave his age as 26 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as brick-setter. His description on his certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 7 ½ inches tall, weight 9 stone 6 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair.  He had a heart pierced by a dagger tattooed on his right upper arm. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had three years previous military service, and had been rejected as unfit by the A.I.F. in August 1914 due to his eyesight.

He completed his medical on 24th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Orange on 24th October 1915.  He was given the rank of Acting Sergeant on 24th October 1915, when he joined the Coo-ees at Orange.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion, retaining his rank as Acting Sergeant.

On 21st November 1915 Acting Sergeant Anlezark was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp. He received a warning.

A letter Acting Sergeant Anlezark wrote to Mr E. T. McNeilly, the Mayor of Orange, while he was in Liverpool Camp, was published in The Leader on 14th February 1916, in which he wrote:

“…Now for some statistics: The Coo-ees marched into camp 273 strong and seven me were added from other units, because of technical knowledge or for other reasons. Of this number unfortunately, twenty one failed to pass the severe Liverpool medical test, and sixteen, for medical or disciplinary reasons, have since been transferred to the home defence forces, or have been discharged – not a large proportion to lose in comparison with the camp experience of other units. And, although thirty men, at their own request, have been transferred to the Light Horse, it will be seen that the Coo-ees column is still substantially intact, an assertion that is further supported by the fact that every non-com but one in the present E. Company marched with the column from the west. The company sergeant major is S. E. Stephens, who, since his service with the first expeditionary force in New Guinea, has been on the ‘Farmer and Settler’ editorial staff. He went to Gilgandra to report the route march for this journal, re-enlisted there, and marched into camp with the column. The platoon sergeants are H. Davenport, of Wongarbon; L. R. Anlezark, of Orange; T. W. Dowd, of Wongarbon; and E. S. Taylor, of Wentworthville. Corporals: C. H. Maidens, of Molong; W. W. Smith, of Geurie; J. E. L. Hourigan, of Parramatta; J. G. Cameron, of Gilgandra; J. McKeown, of Gilgandra; and Pay Corporal, J. C. Gilmour, of Coonamble. Others of the men gathered in on that first route march are qualifying for the non com class; but, unfortunately, as the Coo-ees are reinforcements for a battalion already at the front, and not part of a new battalion, these ranks may only be temporary.

How well, on the whole, the Coo-ees are behaving, and how quickly they are assimilating the lessons to be learned at Liverpool, is evidenced by the fact that, although they only marched into camp on November 14, a fairly big draft has already been made upon E company to make up the 14th reinforcements for the battalion at the front…”.[1]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was C/o Mrs R. Benfield, Railway Estate, Hurstville, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as a friend, Mrs L. Benfield, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Acting Sergeant Anlezark, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, as 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

He was transferred to the 45th Battalion on 19th April 1916.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Anlezark left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle, bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Anlezark served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916, then as through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 24th November 1916 the 45th Battalion was holding the front line trenches in the vicinity of Guedecourt in France, when Private Anlezark was evacuated to the 36th Casualty Clearing Station suffering from Influenza. He was placed aboard the 24th Ambulance Train and sent to the 12th General Hospital at Rouen, France, where he was admitted on 25th November 1916.

On 8th December 1916 he was also diagnosed to be suffering from trench fever, and was evacuated to England by the Hospital Ship Aberdonian.  He was admitted  to the War Hospital at Reading, England, on 9th December 1916.

On 17th January 1917 Private Anlezark was discharged from hospital, and granted leave till 1st February 1917, to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England.

On 23rd March 1917 Private Anlezark was transferred to the 61st Battalion at Wareham, England.

On 29th April 1917 he was transferred back to the 45th Battalion, and departed Folkestone, England, for return to France.

On 30th April 1917 he marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 4th May 1917 he rejoined the 45th Battalion when it was preparing to move at Bouzincourt, France.

Just over one month later, on 7th June 1917 the 45th Battalion was engaged in action around the Messines Ridge, Belgium, attacking German trenches.  During the attack Private Anlezark was wounded in action, receiving a bullet wound to his right arm. He was evacuated to the 9th Casualty Clearing Station on 8th June 1917.  He was then admitted to the 9th General Hospital at Rouen, France, on 9th June 1917.

On 14th June 1917 he was evacuated to England on the Hospital Ship St George, with a gun shot wound to his right arm.

He was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth in England on 15th June 1917.

On 25th June 1917 he was transferred to the Grove Military Hospital at Tooting, England.

On 23rd August 1917 he was moved to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 1st September 1917 Private Anlezark was discharged from hospital, and granted leave till 15th  September 1917, to report to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 20th September 1917 Private Anlezark was transferred to the No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 19th October 1917 he was moved to the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 10th November 1917 Private Anlezark departed Southampton England bound for France. On 11th November 1917 he arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 27th November 1917 he rejoined the 45th Battalion when it was training at St Quentin, France.

Less than a month later, on 24th December 1917 the 45th Battalion was training near Peronne, France, when Private Anlezark was admitted to the 11th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Influenza.  On 31st December he was transferred to the 1st Casualty Clearing Station.  He was discharged to duty on 4th January 1918.

Private Anlezark rejoined the 45th Battalion on 22nd January 1918, when it was training at La Clyette, Belgium.

On 28th July 1918 Private Anlezark was granted leave to Paris, France.

He returned from leave in Paris to the 45th Battalion on 7th August 1918, when the Battalion was near Hamel, France, preparing for a major offensive against German positions, which began the next day.

Private Anlezark served with the 45th Battalion for the remainder of the war.

On 27th January 1919 Private Anlezark departed Le Harve bound for England, arriving at Weymouth on 28th January 1919, where he marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 19th February 1919 Private Anlezark was charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 17th February 1919 till 1200 on 18th February 1919. He was fined two days pay.

On 22nd February 1919 he was transferred to the No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

On 4th March 1919 Private Anlezark was admitted to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Sutton Veny with cellulitis of face.

Private Anlezark departed Southampton, England, on 6th May 1919, aboard the H.M.A.H.S.  Karoola, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 28th June 1919.  He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 18th October 1919.

 

[1] ‘The Coo-ees’, The Leader, 14 February 1916, p. 6. Retrieved December 17, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117790684