Tag Archives: Orange recruits

Robert John SLOEY

Robert John SLOEY

Per his military service record (Depot), Robert John Sloey was born in Wellington, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as book-keeper.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 7 3/8 inches tall, weight 10 stone 7 lbs., with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed he had previous service in the Byrock Rifle Club, and that he had been rejected as unfit for military service once before due to eyesight.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as Mr and Mrs R. J. Sloey, Maxwell Street, Wellington N.S.W.

He appears to have joined the Coo-ee March somewhere between Wellington and Molong. ‘R. J. Sloey’ was reported in the Molong Express and Western District Advertiser on 23rd October 1915 as being one of six recruits that joined the Coo-ee March ‘on the road from Wellington’.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Orange on 24th October 1915.  He was attested at by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Orange on 24th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees rested at Orange).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

His Statement of Service records that on 9th January 1916 Private Sloey deserted from Liverpool Camp. A warrant was issued for his arrest on 16th February 1916. The warrant was withdrawn on 30th January 1919.

 

[1]NAA: B2455, SLOEY ROBERT JOHN

[2] The “Coo-ees” Come. (1915, October 23). Molong Express and Western District Advertiser (NSW : 1887 – 1954), p. 10. Retrieved August 11, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article101050484

 

 

William John SHANNON

William John SHANNON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4889), William John Shannon was born at Glasgow, Scotland.[1]  He gave his age as 24 years and 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 4 1/8 inches tall, weight 8 stone 12 lbs., with a dark complexion, hazel eyes, and black hair.  His religious denomination was recorded as Presbyterian.  He claimed that he had 3 years previous military service in the Royal Field Artillery in Scotland.

William Shannon was listed in The Leader as one of the men who were recruited at Orange to join the Coo-ees’.[2]  He completed his medical examination on 24th October at Orange, and was attested by Captain T. Nicholas at Orange on 24th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 27th January 1915 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp for 11 days.  He was fined 11 days pay.

Private Shannon was involved in hearing at the Central Police Court on 25th January 1916, followed by a court case on 6th March 1916 at the Darlinghurst Quarter Sessions, in which another Coo-ee was charged with, and subsequently found guilty of, having assaulted fellow Coo-ee Daniel Lynch at Central Railway Station about midnight on January 16th 1916, and robbed him of two pounds.[3]  A witness testified that ‘Shannon, who was the worse for drink, took no part in the robbery’, and he was subsequently discharged.[4]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was left blank, and his next of kin is listed as his father, S. [Samuel] Shannon, Lane Street, off Chloride Street, Broken Hill, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916, Private Shannon, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Cannon was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 10th May 1916 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from 1600 on 29th April 1916 until 0600 on 2nd May 1916.  He was awarded 96 hours Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 7 days pay.

On 4th June 1916 Private Shannon left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 25th August 1916 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from 1400 until 2030 on 24th August 1916 and Disobedience of Orders.  He was awarded 21 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 22 days pay.

On 30th May 1917 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from 2045 Parade and from 2100 Tattoo Roll Call until 2200 on 27th May 1917.  He was fined 2 days pay.

Two days later on 1st June 1917 Private Shannon was promoted to Lance Corporal.

On 29th July 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon was detached to the 2nd Army rest Camp.  He re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion on13th August 1917.

On 24th August 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon went on leave.  He re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion from leave on 7th September 1917.

On 4th December 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon was detached to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France, to go before a Medical Board.

On 10th December 1917 he went before the Medical Board and was classified as Permanent Base due to debility.

On 19th December 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon was transferred to England for permanent base duties.

On 20th December 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon marched into No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 10th January 1918 he marched into the 1st Training Brigade/Pioneer Training Battalion at Sutton Veny, England.

On 27th May 1918 Lance Corporal Shannon was sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 7th June 1918 Lance Corporal Shannon departed England on H.M.A.T. Essex to return to Australia for medical discharge (Hallux Valgus) [Bunion].

He arrived in Australia on 1st August 1918, and was discharged medically unfit on 3rd September 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, SHANNON WILLIAM JOHN

[2] ‘The Recruits’, Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 4. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

[3] ‘Soldier Charged’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 January 1916, p. 6. Retrieved March 1, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28782852

[4] ‘Soldier Charged’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 January 1916, p. 6. Retrieved March 1, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28782852

William COLLYER

William COLLYER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4752), William Collyer was born at Wongarbon, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 19 years and 3 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as butcher. (He was the son of Thomas William Collyer and Flora Collyer). [2] His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 10 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He completed his certificate of medical examination on the 17th October 1915 at Wellington (while the Coo-ees were at Wellington). However he was not attested until 24th October 1915 by Captain Nicholas at Orange. A note at the top of his Attestation Paper reads ‘Presented himself 24/10/1915 with form signed by Metcalfe [the doctor at Wellington]. Sworn in 24/10/15’.

His Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form, addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Wellington, was signed by both his father Thomas Collyer and stepmother Ellen Collyer, so perhaps he had travelled back to Wongarbon to get the consent of his parents, before he caught up with the Coo-ees at Orange. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

‘William Colyer’ [sic] was listed in The Leader as one of the men who were recruited at Orange to join the Coo-ees.[3]

‘W. Collyer’ was listed as one of the ‘Wongarbon boys’ with the Coo-ees in The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate.[4]

After completing the remainder of the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The Wellington Times reported that Privates W. Collyer and H. Saunders  were presented with wristlet watches by the residents of Wongarbon at a farewell social while they  were home on final leave on 3rd March 1916.[5]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wongarbon, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, T. Collyer, Wongarbon, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Collyer, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Tel-el-Kebir, and was taken on strength of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.  He was also mustered as a Driver.

On 25th May 1916 he was transferred to the Artillery Training Depot at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 28th May 1916 Gunner Collyer left Alexandria on the HMT Corsican, bound for England.  He disembarked at Plymouth on 12th June 1916, for further training.

On 30th July 1916 Gunner Collyer departed England bound for France.

On 9th August 1916 Gunner Collyer was taken on strength of the 4th Division Ammunition Column in France, while it was training in the vicinity of the village of Acquin, 9 miles from St. Omer.

On 14th October 1916 his rank was changed to Driver.

On 7th March 1917 Driver Collyer’s rank was changed back to Gunner.

On 29th November 1917 Gunner Collyer was granted leave to England.

On 13th December 1917 whilst on leave in England, he was admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England, sick.  He was discharged from Hospital on 1st April 1918.

On 2nd April 1918 he marched into to No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny in England.

On 24th May 1918 he marched out to the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 3rd July 1918 Gunner Collyer departed Southampton for return to Le Havre, France.

Gunner Collyer rejoined his unit on 14th July 1918, when the 4th Division Ammunition Column was at Frenchencourt, France.

On 9th March 1919 Gunner Collyer left his unit, and marched into the Base Depot at Le Harve to commence his return to Australia. He departed France on 31st March 1919.

He arrived at Weymouth, England, on 1st April 1919, where he marched into the No. 4 Command Depot.

On 12th May 1919 Gunner Collyer departed England for return to Australia aboard the HT Port Napier (along with Wongarbon Coo-ee Driver Saunders).

Gunner Collyer arrived in Sydney on 5th July 1919, and was discharged on the 19th of August 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, COLLYER W

[2] NSW Birth Registration 35916/1896 William A Collyer.

[3] ‘The Recruits’, Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 4. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

[4] ‘Our Soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate,  29 October 1915, p. 4. Retrieved January 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601711

[5] ‘At Wongarbon’, Wellington Times,  9 March 1916, p. 6. Retrieved November 29, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143398796

 

Leslie Reginald ANLEZARK

Leslie Reginald ANLEZARK

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4726), Leslie Reginald Anlezark was born at Orange, N.S.W. He gave his age as 26 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as brick-setter. His description on his certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 7 ½ inches tall, weight 9 stone 6 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair.  He had a heart pierced by a dagger tattooed on his right upper arm. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had three years previous military service, and had been rejected as unfit by the A.I.F. in August 1914 due to his eyesight.

He completed his medical on 24th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Orange on 24th October 1915.  He was given the rank of Acting Sergeant on 24th October 1915, when he joined the Coo-ees at Orange.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion, retaining his rank as Acting Sergeant.

On 21st November 1915 Acting Sergeant Anlezark was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp. He received a warning.

A letter Acting Sergeant Anlezark wrote to Mr E. T. McNeilly, the Mayor of Orange, while he was in Liverpool Camp, was published in The Leader on 14th February 1916, in which he wrote:

“…Now for some statistics: The Coo-ees marched into camp 273 strong and seven me were added from other units, because of technical knowledge or for other reasons. Of this number unfortunately, twenty one failed to pass the severe Liverpool medical test, and sixteen, for medical or disciplinary reasons, have since been transferred to the home defence forces, or have been discharged – not a large proportion to lose in comparison with the camp experience of other units. And, although thirty men, at their own request, have been transferred to the Light Horse, it will be seen that the Coo-ees column is still substantially intact, an assertion that is further supported by the fact that every non-com but one in the present E. Company marched with the column from the west. The company sergeant major is S. E. Stephens, who, since his service with the first expeditionary force in New Guinea, has been on the ‘Farmer and Settler’ editorial staff. He went to Gilgandra to report the route march for this journal, re-enlisted there, and marched into camp with the column. The platoon sergeants are H. Davenport, of Wongarbon; L. R. Anlezark, of Orange; T. W. Dowd, of Wongarbon; and E. S. Taylor, of Wentworthville. Corporals: C. H. Maidens, of Molong; W. W. Smith, of Geurie; J. E. L. Hourigan, of Parramatta; J. G. Cameron, of Gilgandra; J. McKeown, of Gilgandra; and Pay Corporal, J. C. Gilmour, of Coonamble. Others of the men gathered in on that first route march are qualifying for the non com class; but, unfortunately, as the Coo-ees are reinforcements for a battalion already at the front, and not part of a new battalion, these ranks may only be temporary.

How well, on the whole, the Coo-ees are behaving, and how quickly they are assimilating the lessons to be learned at Liverpool, is evidenced by the fact that, although they only marched into camp on November 14, a fairly big draft has already been made upon E company to make up the 14th reinforcements for the battalion at the front…”.[1]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was C/o Mrs R. Benfield, Railway Estate, Hurstville, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as a friend, Mrs L. Benfield, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Acting Sergeant Anlezark, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, as 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

He was transferred to the 45th Battalion on 19th April 1916.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Anlezark left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle, bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Anlezark served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916, then as through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 24th November 1916 the 45th Battalion was holding the front line trenches in the vicinity of Guedecourt in France, when Private Anlezark was evacuated to the 36th Casualty Clearing Station suffering from Influenza. He was placed aboard the 24th Ambulance Train and sent to the 12th General Hospital at Rouen, France, where he was admitted on 25th November 1916.

On 8th December 1916 he was also diagnosed to be suffering from trench fever, and was evacuated to England by the Hospital Ship Aberdonian.  He was admitted  to the War Hospital at Reading, England, on 9th December 1916.

On 17th January 1917 Private Anlezark was discharged from hospital, and granted leave till 1st February 1917, to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England.

On 23rd March 1917 Private Anlezark was transferred to the 61st Battalion at Wareham, England.

On 29th April 1917 he was transferred back to the 45th Battalion, and departed Folkestone, England, for return to France.

On 30th April 1917 he marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 4th May 1917 he rejoined the 45th Battalion when it was preparing to move at Bouzincourt, France.

Just over one month later, on 7th June 1917 the 45th Battalion was engaged in action around the Messines Ridge, Belgium, attacking German trenches.  During the attack Private Anlezark was wounded in action, receiving a bullet wound to his right arm. He was evacuated to the 9th Casualty Clearing Station on 8th June 1917.  He was then admitted to the 9th General Hospital at Rouen, France, on 9th June 1917.

On 14th June 1917 he was evacuated to England on the Hospital Ship St George, with a gun shot wound to his right arm.

He was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth in England on 15th June 1917.

On 25th June 1917 he was transferred to the Grove Military Hospital at Tooting, England.

On 23rd August 1917 he was moved to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 1st September 1917 Private Anlezark was discharged from hospital, and granted leave till 15th  September 1917, to report to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 20th September 1917 Private Anlezark was transferred to the No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 19th October 1917 he was moved to the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 10th November 1917 Private Anlezark departed Southampton England bound for France. On 11th November 1917 he arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 27th November 1917 he rejoined the 45th Battalion when it was training at St Quentin, France.

Less than a month later, on 24th December 1917 the 45th Battalion was training near Peronne, France, when Private Anlezark was admitted to the 11th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Influenza.  On 31st December he was transferred to the 1st Casualty Clearing Station.  He was discharged to duty on 4th January 1918.

Private Anlezark rejoined the 45th Battalion on 22nd January 1918, when it was training at La Clyette, Belgium.

On 28th July 1918 Private Anlezark was granted leave to Paris, France.

He returned from leave in Paris to the 45th Battalion on 7th August 1918, when the Battalion was near Hamel, France, preparing for a major offensive against German positions, which began the next day.

Private Anlezark served with the 45th Battalion for the remainder of the war.

On 27th January 1919 Private Anlezark departed Le Harve bound for England, arriving at Weymouth on 28th January 1919, where he marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 19th February 1919 Private Anlezark was charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 17th February 1919 till 1200 on 18th February 1919. He was fined two days pay.

On 22nd February 1919 he was transferred to the No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

On 4th March 1919 Private Anlezark was admitted to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Sutton Veny with cellulitis of face.

Private Anlezark departed Southampton, England, on 6th May 1919, aboard the H.M.A.H.S.  Karoola, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 28th June 1919.  He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 18th October 1919.

 

[1] ‘The Coo-ees’, The Leader, 14 February 1916, p. 6. Retrieved December 17, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117790684

 

Sidney James De Courcy HEUSTON

Sidney James De Courcy HEUSTON

Pte. S. Heuston (The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial, 14/10/1916)

Pte. S. Heuston (The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial, 14/10/1916)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4796), Sidney James De Courcy Heuston was born at Coonamble, N.S.W.  He gave his age as 18 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as plumber.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 ¾ inches tall, weight 8 stone 3 lbs., with a dark complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair.  His religious denomination was Methodist.  He claimed that he had four years previous military service with the Senior Cadets.

Written on the top of his Attestation Paper is that he ‘Presented at Orange 24/10/15’.  He completed his medical examination on the 24th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Orange on 24th October 1915.  “S. J. Deloury Hewston”was named as one of the men who were recruited to join the Coo-ees at Orange in the Leader. [1]

His initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form dated 24th October 1915 was addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Orange, and his postal address was Parkes Street, Wellington.  His parents George Heuston and Louise Heuston both signed this form, giving consent for their son to join, as he was under 21 years of age.  However, it was noted that he had joined the Coo-ee March at Wellington in an article in the Sunday Times a year after he had joined.[2]  His place of enlistment is listed as ‘Wellington’ on the Medical Report on an Invalid form dated 25th September 1916 in his service record.  So it appears he may first have presented to join the Coo-ees when they recruited at Wellington on 16th and 17th October 1915, then caught up with them and joined them at Orange where the Coo-ees stayed overnight on 24th October 1915, after his parents had signed his consent form.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 7th February 1916 Private Heuston was charged at Liverpool Camp with being absent from special picquet on 5th February 1916.  He was fined 5 shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Park[es] Street, Wellington, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, G. W. DeC. Heuston, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Heuston, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916, he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt, along with some of the other Coo-ees.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Hueston left Alexandria with several other Coo-ees in  45th Battalion aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle, bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Heuston served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France, in July 1916 then as it moved to Pozieres in early August 1916.

On the night of the 5th/6th of August 1916 the 45th Battalion was in the front line trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, France.  Private Heuston was wounded in action on 6th August 1916, suffering a gunshot wound to his right leg, and was evacuated to the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station.

He was then admitted to the 13th General Hospital at Boulogne, France, on 7th August 1916.

On 11th August 1916 Private Hueston was sent by the Hospital Ship Jan Breydel to England, and admitted to the 1st Birmingham War Hospital, with a gunshot wound to the right thigh.

On 6th September 1916 Private Heuston was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England (3 days after Captain Bill Hitchen had died in the same hospital).

On 28th September 1916 he was discharged from hospital and sent to Weymouth, England.

On 12th November 1916 Private Heuston departed England aboard the H.T. Wiltshire, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 31st December 1916, and was discharged medically unfit on 28th February 1917.

[1] ‘The Recruits’, Leader, 25 October 1915,  p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

[2] ‘The Coo-ees’, Sunday Times, 8 October 1916, p. 9, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article121335018

 

William Sidney LOVETT

William Sidney LOVETT

Per his military service record (regimental no. 25563), William Sidney Lovett was born at Wellington, N.S.W. He gave his age as 19 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical examination was height 5 feet 5 ¾ inches tall, weight 141 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had six months experience in the Senior Cadets at Wellington.

W. S. Lovett was named in the Leader as one of the recruits who joined the Coo-ees at Orange.[1] He was attested by Captain Nicholas at Orange on the 24th October 1915, and completed his medical examination in Orange on the same day. It was noted on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Orange that his parents were both deceased.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for 13th Battalion.

On 1st February 1916 he was transferred to the reinforcements of the 7th Field Artillery Brigade.

On 6th June 2016 he was designated a Gunner.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Warren, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as Miss E. M. [Ethel Mary] Gardiner, friend, “Coolma,” Lower Wycombe Road, Neutral Bay, Sydney, N.S.W.

Gunner Lovett departed Sydney on the HMAT Orsova A67 on 29th July 1916 with the 2nd Reinforcements for the 7th Field Artillery Brigade, and arrived at Plymouth in England on 14th September 1916.

On 6th October 1916 Private Lovett was charged with A.W.L., overstaying leave from midnight on 28th September 1916 to 4 pm on 29th September 1916. He was fined 2 days pay.

On the 24th of October 1916 he marched into the 14th Training Battalion at Hurdcott, Wiltshire, England.

On 25th November 1916 he was admitted to Fovant Military Hospital in England sick. He was discharged on 12th December 1916, and marched into the 14th Training Battalion at Hurdecott. He was re-admitted to hospital for observation on 20th December 1916.

On 8th February 1917 Private Lovett departed Folkestone aboard the S.S. Invicta bound for France. He marched into the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France on 9th February 1917.

He was taken on strength of the 55th Infantry Battalion on 12th February 1917 when it was preparing to move into the front line in the vicinity of Longueval, France.

On 10th May 1917 the 55th Battalion was manning the front line near Noreuil, France, when Private Lovett was wounded in action by a gas poisoning. He was sent to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance. On 11th May 1917 he was moved back to the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station. On 12th May 1917 he was placed aboard the 20th Ambulance Train and on 13th May 1917 he was admitted to the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital at Doullens, France. On 20th May 1917 he was transferred to the 18th General Hospital at Camiers in France.

On 30th May 1917 he was placed aboard a Hospital Ship for evacuation to England. He was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth, England, later that day.

He was discharged on 15th September 1917 and granted two weeks leave, and to report to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England, on 29th September 1917.

On 6th October 1917 Private Lovett was transferred to the Number 4 Command Depot at Codfod, England. On 12th October 1917 he was transferred to the Overseas Training Brigade at Perhham Downs.

On 2nd November 1917 Private Lovett departed Southampton bound for France.

He marched into the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at le Harve, France, on 3rd November 1917.

On 14th November 1917 Private Lovett rejoined the 55th Battalion. On the same day he was admitted to the 50th Casualty Clearing Station suffering Dermatitis. On the 16th of November 1917 he was placed aboard the 20th Ambulance Train and moved back to the 26th General Hospital at Etaples, France on the 17th of November 1917. On the 20th of November 1917 he was transferred to the 25th General Hospital. He was discharged on the 5th of December and sent to the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 24th December 1917 Private Lovett was transferred to the 7th Field Artillery Brigade and designated a Gunner, and marched out to the 3rd Division Artillery.

On 14th January 1918 Gunner Lovett was appointed Driver.

On 5th November 1918 Driver Lovett went on leave to England. He returned from leave on 25th November 1918.

On 12th February 1919 Driver Lovett was admitted to the 47th Casualty Clearing Station suffering Influenza. On 20th February 1919 he was moved to the 55th Casualty Clearing Station. On 22nd February 1919 he was placed aboard the 31st Ambulance Train, and on 24th February 1919 he was admitted to the 14th General Hospital. He was discharged on 3rd March 1919, and sent to the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 9th April 1919 Driver Lovett was admitted to the 39th General Hospital with Scabies. He was discharged on 13th April 1919.

On the 15th of April 1919 Driver Lovett departed France bound for England to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at Southampton on 16th April 1919 and marched into the Number 2 Group.

On 15th June 1919 Driver Lovett departed England aboard the H.T. Swakopmund bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 2nd August 1919, and was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 17th September 1919.

[1] ‘The Recruits,’ Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 4 , http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

 

William Henry GRIFFITHS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5089), William Henry Griffiths was born at Waterloo Flat, Victoria. He gave his age as 33 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as engine driver. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 9 stone 10 lbs., with a fair complexion, hazel eyes, and auburn (dark) hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

William Griffiths was named in an article titled ‘Blayney recruits’ in the Leader as one of six men who have joined ‘as a result of the visit of the Coo-ees to Blayney’.[1] The Coo-ees had held a recruiting meeting and stayed overnight at Blayney on 26th October 1915.

He completed his medical examination at Orange on 1st November 1915, and was attested at at Orange on the same day.

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 18th February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave for two days, and he was fined ten shillings. On 21st February 1916 he was charged with being absent from parade, and he was fined five shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 2 Hambleton Street, Albert Park, Melbourne, Victoria, and his next of kin was listed as his father, E. R. Griffiths, at the same address.

An initial Regimental No. 4784 is crossed out on his Attestation Paper, and replaced with 5089. Private Griffiths departed Sydney on the HMAT A16 Star of Victoria A16 on 31st March 1916 with two other Coo-ees, as 16th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on the 8th May 1916.

On 7th June 1916 Private Griffiths left Alexandria aboard a transport ship bound for France, and he arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

He was sent to the 4th Division Base Depot at Etaples, France. He marched in and was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion on 21st July 1916, when it was training at Naours, France.

On 21st August 1916 Private Griffiths was sent to the 3rd Canadian General Hospital at Boulogne, France, suffering Nephrites.

On 25th August 1916 he was evacuated to England aboard the Hospital Ship Brighton. Later that day he was admitted to the Guildford War Hospital at Guildford, England.

On 20th November 1916 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England. On 2nd December 1916 he was discharged from Hospital, and sent to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 2nd January 1917 Private Griffiths was sent to the Infantry Drafting Depot at Pernham Downs, England. On 22nd July 1917 he departed Southampton, bound for France. He arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot on 24th July 1917. He departed the 4th Australian Division Base Depot on the 9th of August 1917, and rejoined the 13th Battalion on 11th August 1917, when it was conducting working parties in the vicinity of Neuve Eglise, Belgium.

On 25th September 1917 the 13th Battalion was manning the front line trenches in the vicinity of Westhoek, Belgium, when Private Griffiths was wounded in action, receiving a shrapnel wound to his chest. He was moved back to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance. On 27th September 1917 he was moved to the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station, where he was placed aboard the 24th Ambulance Train, and moved to the 7th Canadian General Hospital at Etaples, France.

On 10th October 1917 he was placed aboard the hospital Ship Lille De Liege and evacuated to England. He was admitted to the Royal Surrey War Hospital at Guildford in England later that day.

Private Griffiths was discharged from hospital on 29th November 1917, and granted leave to report to the Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on the 13th of December 1917.

On 18th January 1918 Private Griffiths was admitted to the Sutton Veny Military Hospital, suffering Bronchitis. He was discharged and sent back to the Number 1 Command Depot on 12th February 1918.

On 16th March 1918 Private Griffiths was transferred to the Australian Motor Transport Service as a cleaner.

His service record includes a certified extract of a marriage certificate for a marriage on 21st August 1918 between William Henry Griffiths (soldier) and Kathleen Spires at Christ Church, Chelsea, England.

On 31st January 1919 Private Griffiths marched into the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England, to commence his return to Australia. On 5th February 1919 he was transferred to the Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

Private Griffiths departed England on 2nd April 1919 for return to Australia with his wife, aboard the H.T. Benalla. He arrived in Australia on 5th May 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 15th November 1919.

[1] ‘Blayney recruits’, Leader, 29 October 1915, p. 8, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842821

John William THOMPSON

John William THOMPSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4609), John William Thompson was born at Camperdown, Sydney, N.S.W. He gave his age as 25 years and 4 months, his marital status as single and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 2 5/8 inches tall, weight 8 stone 11 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military experience. He completed his medical on the 24th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested at Orange by Captain Nicholas on the 24th October 1915.

He was named as one of the recruits who joined the Coo-ees at Orange in the Leader.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 4 Raglan Street, Darlington, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, J. W. Thompson, Botany, Sydney, N.S.W..

On 16th February 1916 Private Thompson was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

During the voyage, Private Thompson (along with several other Coo-ees on the ship) was charged with being absent without leave from on 8th March 1916 whilst at Colombo, Ceylon. He was fined 1 pound.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 John William Thompson was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post.

On 3rd April 1916 Private Thompson was sent to the 15th Australian Field Ambulance sick. He was moved back to the 2nd Casualty Clearing Station later that day. He was placed aboard the 4th Hospital Train and moved to the 1st Australian Stationary Hospital at Ismalia in Egypt. He was transferred to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Abbassia in Egypt on 4th April 1916. He was discharged from hospital for duty on 6th June 1916.

On 6th August 1916 Private Thompson left Alexandria bound for England. He arrived later that month.

On 31st August 1916 Private Thompson was sent to the Fargo Military Hospital ill with an unstated condition. He was discharged and marched into the 4th Training Battalion at Rollerstone in England on 5th September 1916.

On 2nd November 1916 Private Thompson departed Folkestone, England, aboard the Transport Golden Eagle bound for France. He then marched into the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France the next day. He was taken on strength of the 54th Battalion on 22nd November 1916.

On 8th May 1917 Private Thompson was sent to the 5th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from the effects of an inoculation. He was moved back to the 5th Division Rest Station and rejoined the Battalion on 12th May 1917.

On 1st June 1917 Private Thompson was sent to the 6th Field Ambulance ill with “soft sore”. He was moved back to the 5th Division Rest Station later that day. On 6th June 1917 he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital. He was discharged on 22nd June 1917 and sent to the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 26th August 1917.

On 2nd October 1917 Private Thompson went on leave to England. Whilst in England he was charged with being absent without leave from 8th October 1917 till 15th October 1917. He was fined 22 days pay.

Private Thompson returned from leave and rejoined his unit on 26th October 1917.

On 30th November 1917 Private Thompson was charged with being absent without leave from 11th November 1917 till 25th November 1917. He was awarded 28 days field punishment number 2.

On 5th January 1918 Private Thompson was charged with being absent without leave from 0900 on 3rd January 1917 till 2150 on 3rd January 1918. He was awarded 7 days field punishment number 2.

On 11th January 1918 Private Thompson was sent to the 14th Field Ambulance sick and he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital. He was discharged on 26th January 1918 and sent to the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He rejoined the Battalion on 20th February 1918.

On 11th April 1918 Private Thompson was wounded in action, receiving a shrapnel wound to his left hand. He was sent to a Field Ambulance then moved back to a casualty clearing station, then on 12th April 1918 he was admitted to the 12th General Hospital at Rouen, France. He was discharged on 13th April 1918 and sent to the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 10th June 1918.

On 25th June 1918 Private Thompson was sent to the 5th Army School of Cookery. On 11th July 1918 he was sent to the Australian Division Base Depot, then on 31st July 1918 he rejoined his unit.

On 21st August 1918 he was received by Assistant Provost Marshal Havre from Paris. On 23rd August 1918 he was placed in custody pending disposal. On 26th August 1918 Private Thompson was charged with being absent without leave from the 0730 on 18th August 1918 till 2240 on 20th August 1918. He was awarded 14 days field punishment number 2.

On 29th September 1918 Private Thompson was wounded in action for the second time, receiving a gunshot wound to his left hand. He was sent to a Field Ambulance then moved back to the 30th Casualty Clearing Station. On 1st October 1918 he was admitted to the 4th General Hospital.

On 12th October 1918 he was placed aboard a Hospital Ship for evacuation to England. He was admitted to the Ontario Military Hospital at Orplington, England later that day.

Whilst in hospital Private Thompson was charged with being absent without leave from 2100 on 21st October 1918 till 1900 on 22nd October 1918. He was fined 1 days pay.

He was discharged from hospital on 29th October 1918 and granted leave to report to the Number 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott in England on 12th November 1918.

On 16th November 1918 Private Thompson was charged with being absent without leave from 1030 on 13th November 1918 till 1000 on 16th November 1918. He was fined 3 days pay.

On 18th November he marched into No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott from Army Headquarters in London ex furlough.

On 2nd December 1918 Private Thompson marched into the Australian Army Medical Corps Training Depot.

Private Thompson departed England on 5th January 1919 for return to Australia aboard the Transport Kanowna. He disembarked in Sydney on 14th March 1919. He was discharged at Sydney medically unfit with amputated forefinger left hand, gunshot wound, on 5th May 1919.

[1] ‘The Recruits’, Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

Edwin Joseph FULLER

Edwin Joseph FULLER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4493), Edwin Joseph Fuller was born at Norwood, England. He gave his age as 21 years and 6 months, his marital status as single and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 3 7/8 inches tall, weight 9 stone 10 lbs., with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military experience. He completed his medical on the 23rd October 1915 at Orange, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Orange on the 24th October 1915.

He was named as one of the recruits who joined the Coo-ees at Orange in the Leader.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Cresswell Hall, Easter Avenue, Kensington, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, J. E. [John Edwin] Fuller, 6 Southdown Road, Stanley Road, Wallington, Surrey, England. (He had listed his posted address as “Orange” on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Orange).

On 16th February 1916 Private Fuller was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

During the voyage, Private Fuller was charged with being absent without leave from 0500 till 1900 on 8th March 1916 whilst at Colombo, Ceylon. He was fined 1 day’s pay.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916. On 1st April 1916 Private Fuller was transferred to the 54th Battalion.

On 19th June 1916 Private Fuller left Alexandria aboard H.T. Caledonian bound for France. On 26th June 1916 whilst at sea he was charged with Slackness at Sentry Post. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment Number 2. The HT Caledonian arrived at Marseilles on 29th June 1916.

On the 19th/20th July 1916 Private Fuller participated in the Battle of Fromelles. He survived the battle unscathed, however on 31st July 1916 he was sent to the 14th Field Ambulance suffering shell shock. On 2nd August he was moved back to a Casualty Clearing Station. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 16th August 1916.

On 25th November 1916 Private Fuller was sent to the 14th Field Ambulance ill with Influenza. On 26th November 1916 he was moved back to the 38th Casualty Clearing Station. On 28th November 1916 he was placed aboard an Ambulance train and sent to the 5th General Hospital at Rouen, France, being admitted on 29th November 1916. On 8th December 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Carisbrook Castle at Le Harve and evacuated to England.

After he had recovered in England, on 16th January 1917 Private Fuller departed Folkestone, England, aboard the Transport Princess Clementine bound for France. On 17th January 1917 he arrived at the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 19th January 1917 Private Fuller was charged with being absent from medical parade after being duly warned for draft. He was awarded 4 days Field Punishment Number 2.

On 31st January 1917 Private Fuller was charged with being in Etaples without a pass. He was awarded 8 days Field Punishment Number 2.

On 8th February 1917 Private Fuller rejoined the 54th Battalion when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Longueval, France.

On 30th April 1917 Private Fuller was sent to the 15th Field Ambulance sick with Influenza. He was admitted to the 5th Division Rest Station later that day. On 25th June 1917 he rejoined the 54th Battalion when it was conducting training at Warloy, France.

On 16th September 1917 Private Fuller was promoted to Lance Corporal.

On 20th September 1917 Lance Corporal Fuller went on leave to England. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 4th October 1917.

Three weeks later on 23rd October 1917 Lance Corporal Fuller was wounded in action, being gassed. He was sent to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance. On 24th October 1917 he was moved back to the 5th Division Rest Station. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 7th November 1917.

On 25th February 1918 Lance Corporal Fuller went to Paris on leave. He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 9th March 1918.

On 19th March 1918 Lance Corporal Fuller was sent to the 14th Field Ambulance suffering Scabies. He was sent to the 5th Australian Division Rest Station later that day, He rejoined the 54th Battalion on 23rd March 1918.

On 25th September 1918 Lance Corporal Fuller went on leave to England.

He returned from leave on 11th October 1918 and was transferred to the 56th Battalion.

On 9th April 1919 Lance Corporal Fuller marched into the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve, France, to commence his return to Australia. He departed France on 16th April 1919. He arrived at Weymouth, England on 17th April 1919 and marched into the Number 5 Group.

Lance Corporal Fuller departed Devonport, England, on 2nd June 1919 for return to Australia, aboard the H.T. Beltana. He arrived in Australia on 19th July 1919. He was discharged Termination of Enlistment on 12th September 1919.

[1] ‘The Recruits’, Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

 

 

Charles William Gordon CONROY

Charles William Gordon CONROY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4460), Charles William Gordon Conroy was born at Thames, New Zealand. He gave his age as 41 years and 6 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as chemist. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 ¾ inches tall, weight 9 stone 2 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to 6 months previous military service with the Rifle Corps, Waihi, N.Z. He undertook his medical on the 25th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested on 25th October 1915 at Orange by Captain Nicholas, “Gilgandra Recruits”, on the day the Coo-ees left Orange.

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Conroy went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Orange Post Office, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs. M. J. Conroy, Orange Post Office, N.S.W.

Private Conroy departed Sydney on the HMAT A70 Ballarat along with a group of other Coo-ees on the 16th February 1916 as 14th Reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

A note in his service record reports that Private Conroy was found guilty on 9th March 1916 while on the HMAT A70 Ballarat en route for Egypt of being absent without leave and breaking ranks at Columbo on 7th March 1916, and was fined £1.

Private Conroy arrived in Egypt on the HMAT A70 Ballarat on 22nd March 1916. On the 1st April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Australian Infantry Battalion.

While in Egypt he was sent to the Field Ambulance at Katoomba Heights on 23rd May 1916. He was discharged from No. 1 Field Ambulance at Ferry Post and rejoined his unit on 26th May 1916.

He embarked on the HT Caledonian at Alexandria on 19th June 1916, and disembarked at Marseilles, France, on 29th June 1916.

Private Conroy participated in the 54th Battalion’s attack on the Germans in the Battle of Fromelles on 19th/20th July 1916. He was reported missing on 19th/20th July 1916, which was changed to be reported as Killed in Action 19th/20th July 1916 on 28th July 1916.

Private Conroy has no known grave, and his name is commemorated at the V. C. Corner Australian Cemetery and Memorial at Fromelles, France.

V.C. Corner Cemetery and Memorial (Photograph: H. Thompson 1/9/2014)

V.C. Corner Cemetery and Memorial (Photograph: S & H Thompson 1/9/2014)

"CONROY C W" name on V. C. Corner Cemetery and Memorial (Photograph: S & H Thompson, 1/9/2014)

“CONROY C. W.” name on V. C. Corner Cemetery and Memorial (Photograph: S & H Thompson 1/9/2014)

Private Conroy’s name is also commemorated on panel 158 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.