Tag Archives: Ashfield recruits

Charles Edward BOW

Charles Edward BOW

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4735), Charles Edward Bow was born at Parramatta, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 29 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as bricklayer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 3 ½ inches tall, weight 9 stone 6 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Congregational. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination at Ashfield on 12th November 1915, and was attested at Ashfield by Lieutenant S. Stilling on the 12th November 1915 (on the last day of the Coo-ee March, the day the Coo-ees marched from Ashfield to Sydney).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 22nd December 1915 Private Bow was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp on the 17th, 18th and 19th of December 1915. He was fined.

On 8th February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp on the 1st and 2nd of February 1916. He was fined.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was his address was C/o Mrs J. Langan, Tolorno, Coventry Road, Homebush, N.S.W.  His next of kin was listed as his father, G.[George] Bow, Phillip Street, Parramatta, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Bow departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England along with many of the other Coo-ees, arriving in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Bow was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-El-Kebir, Egypt.

On 4th June 1916 Private Bow left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Bow served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France until on 20th September 1917 when Private Bow was admitted to the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station with Malaria. On 27th September 1917 he was transferred to the 2nd Stationary Hospital at Abbeville, France, with a fissure.

On 2nd October 1917 he was placed aboard a Hospital Ship bound for England. He was admitted to the 1st Southern General Hospital at Birmingham, England with severe Haemorrhoids.

On 11th October 1917 Private Bow was discharged from Hospital and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command depot at Sutton Veny, England, on 25th October 1917.

On 3rd November 1917 Private Bow was admitted to the Sutton Veny Military Hospital suffering Asthma. He was discharged to No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 9th of November 1917.

On 4th December 1917 Private Bow was found by a Medical Board to have chronic bronchitis.

On 29th December 1917 Private Bow marched out to No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 30th January 1918 Private Bow commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.T. Euripides for medical discharge from Plymouth, England.

He arrived in Australia on 21st March 1918.

He was discharged medically unfit with chronic bronchitis at Sydney on 4th May 1918.

 

[1] NAA B2455, BOW C E

Robert AYRES

Robert AYRES

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4729), Robert Ayres was born at Surrey Hills, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 41 years and 11 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as cab driver.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height  5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 140 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Wesleyan.  He claimed to have no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.  He was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway when the Coo-ees were at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 2 Mill Street, Croydon, N.S.W.[2]  His next of kin was listed as his wife, Mrs M. [Martha] Ayres, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Ayres, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 7th of June 1916 Private Ayres left Alexandria aboard the H.T. Ionian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

He joined the 13th Battalion in France on 19th August 1916.

Ten days later, on 29th August 1916 the 13th Battalion was in action around Mouquet Farm, France.  During the previous 24 hour period the 13th Battalion was under heavy artillery fire, and had suffered a total of 18 killed, 99 wounded and 33 missing.[3] Private Ayres was one of those wounded, being evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station suffering Shell Shock.

On 6th September 1916 Private Ayres was sent to the 3rd Convalescent Depot at Etaples, France.

On 9th September 1916 he marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples.

On 7th January 1917 Private Ayres re-joined the 13th Battalion when it was at Mametz, France.[4]

On 29th January 1917 Private Ayres was detached for duty at the Corps Baths at Heilly, France.

On 20th April 1917 Private Ayres was sent to hospital. He re-joined the 13th Battalion on 26th April 1917, when it was training at Ribemont, France.[5]

On 14th September 1917 Private Ayres was detached from the 13th Battalion for duty at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He arrived on 16th September 1917.

On 26th September 1917 Private Ayres was transferred to England.  He arrived at Weymouth, England, on 27th September 1917, where he marched into the No. 2 Command Depot.

Private Ayres departed England on 31st October 1917 for return to Australia, suffering senility, aboard the H.M.A.T. Berrima.

He disembarked at Sydney on 31st December 1917.

Private Ayres was discharged medically unfit on 31st January 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, AYRES R

[2] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Robert Ayres, 4729.

[3] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, August 1916.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, January 1917.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, April 1917.

William Charles ELLERY

William Charles ELLERY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4769), William Charles Ellery was born at Castlemaine, Victoria.[1]  He gave his age as 43 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 168 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Wesleyan.  He claimed to have no previous military service.

In the Dunedoo Chronicle section of the Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative, it was reported that a large crowd farewelled Mr. W. C. Ellery at the local train station, ‘who left by train for Lithgow in the hope of joining Hitchen’s “Coo-ees”’.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.  He was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway when the Coo-ees were at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.  His ‘Oath to be taken by person being enlisted’ section on his Attestation Paper was dated from 2nd November 1915 (when the Coo-ees were in Lithgow).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Dunedoo, N.S.W.[3]  His next of kin was listed as friend, W. Miller, C/o A. Yeo, Merrygoen, Dunedoo, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Ellery, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 Private Ellery was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 18th June 1916 Private Ellery left Alexandria aboard the Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 29th June 1916.

Private Ellery served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 31st December 1916  the 45th Battalion was training at Flesslers, France when Private Elley was evacuated sick. On 11th January 1917 Private Ellery was admitted to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance suffering Rheumatism. He was discharged on 16th January 1917, and rejoined the 45th Battalion when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Gudecourt, France.

On 23rd April 1917 the 45th Battalion was training at Bresle, France, when Private Ellery was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Chronic Rheumatism.

He was discharged to duty on 4th May 1917, and returned to the 45th Battalion on 6th May 1917, when it was still at Bresle, France.

On 14th May 1917 Private Ellery was admitted to the 7th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Chronic Rheumatism. He was discharged on 25th May 1917, and rejoined the 45th Battalion when it was at Neuve Eglise, France, providing working parties in the rear area of the front.

On 12th December 1917 the 45th Battalion was training at Haut Allaines, France, when Private Ellery was evacuated sick. On 13th December 1917 he was evacuated to the 9th General Hospital at Rouen, France, suffering from Rheumatic Fever.

On 14th December 1917 Private Ellery was placed aboard a Hospital Ship for evacuation to England.

On 15th December 1917 he was admitted to the University War Hospital at Southampton, England suffering Chronic Rheumatism.

On 9th January 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

On 13th January 1918 Private Ellery was discharged from hospital, and marched into the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

Private Ellery commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.T. Dunvegan Castle on 13th March 1918.  On 21st May 1918 he embarked at Captetown, South Africa, aboard H.T. Tofua.

He disembarked at Melbourne on 14th June 1918.

He was discharged medically unfit with chronic rheumatic arthritis on 3rd August 1918.

Note: It appears from a newspaper article about his welcome home to Dunedoo on 27th November 1918 that the surname of “Ellery” that he enlisted under may have been an assumed name, and that his surname was actually “Burly” or “Burley”.[4]

 

[1] NAA: B2455, ELLERY W C

[2] ‘The Doings Of The West’, Gilgandra Weekly (NSW : 1915 – 1929), 12 November 1915, p. 15. Retrieved November 12, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119922120

[3] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, William Charles Ellery.

[4] ‘Presentation to Returned Soldiers’, Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative, 5 December 1918, p. 11. Retrieved November 12, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article157145589

 

Joseph Jacob John HERRINGE

Joseph Jacob John HERRINGE

Joseph Herringe and his mother Mrs Bridget Herringe (Photograph courtesy of Marie Cribbin)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5700), Joseph Jacob John Herringe was born at Cowra, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as fitter.  He stated he has been apprenticed as a gasfitter for 3 years to A. Wright at Cowra. He claimed that he had 2 years previous military service with the 41st Infantry at Cowra.

His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 147 lbs., with a ruddy complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.

He completed his medical examination on 11th November 1915 at Ashfield, and was attested by Lieutenant Frank Middenway at Ashfield on 11th November 1915. His date of joining was recorded as 11th November 1915, the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield.

It appears that Joseph Herringe may have first presented to join the Co-ees at Katoomba, as a ‘J. Herringe’ was listed in The Blue Mountain Echo on 12th November 1915 as ‘one of the lads who answered the call, and marched out [of Katoomba] with the “Coo-ees” on their triumphant march to the sea’.[2]  (Several of the Coo-ees listed in this article did not undertake their attestation and medical examination until further along the march, or until they reached Liverpool Camp).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Private Herringe, along with Private Colin Wren, ‘of the Coo-ees’, were ‘among the lads in khaki’ reported to be in Cowra on leave in the Cowra Free Press on 27th November 1915.[3]

They were both reported being on leave again ‘spending the festive season with their relatives and friends’ in the Cowra Free Press on 30th December 1915.[4]

On his embarkation roll Private Herringe’s address at time of enrolment was Grenfell Road, Cowra, N.S.W. His next of kin was recorded as his mother, Mrs B. [Bridget] M. Herringe, at the same address.[5]

On 3rd May 1916 Private Herringe departed Sydney on the HMAT A46 Clan McGillivray, along with fellow Coo-ees Private Saunders and Private Keating, as part of the 18th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Clan MacGillivray A46

He arrived in Egypt in June 1916.

On 6th August 1916 Private Herringe departed Egypt bound for England aboard the Transport Megantic.

He was sent to the 4th Training Battalion at Rollerstone, England.

On 23rd September 1916 Private Herringe departed England bound for France.

He marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France on 24th September 1916.

He was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion on the 4th of October 1916 whilst it was training and reorganising in the vicinity of Reninghelst, Belgium.

On 18th October 1916 the 13th Battalion was relieving the 15th Battalion in the front line in the vicinity of Zonnebeke, Belgium, when Private Herringe was wounded by mustard gas poisoning.  He was moved back to the 11th Australian Field Ambulance, then to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance.

On 20th October 1917 Private Herringe was sent to the 2nd Canadian Casualty Clearing Station. On 22nd October 1917 he was admitted to the 16th General Hospital at Le Treport, France.

On 5th November 1917 Private Herringe was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Panama for evacuation to England. On 6th November 1917 he was admitted to the 1st Southern General Hospital at Birmingham, England, with status ‘gassed severe’.

He was discharged on 15th November 1917, and marched into the No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 12th February 1918 Private Herringe was transferred to the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge Deverill, England.

On 23rd February 1918 Private Herringe was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 21st February 1918 until 8.30 a.m. on 23rd February 1918. He was awarded 4 days field punishment no. 2, and fined 5 days pay.

On 4th March 1918 Private Herringe departed Southampton, England bound for France.  He marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve on 5th March 1918.

He re-joined the 13th Battalion on 9th March 1918 whilst it was training in the vicinity of Neuve Eglise, France.

On 28th April 1918 Private Herringe was sent to the 14th Australian Field Ambulance then moved to the 20th Casualty Clearance Station with a condition not yet diagnosed. He was discharged and returned to the 13th Battalion on 30th April 1918 when it was at Glisy, France.

On 25th May 1918 the 13th Battalion was conducting training at Allonville, France, when Private Herringe was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance suffering pyrexia.  He was moved back to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station. On 26th May 1918 he was placed aboard the 20th Ambulance Train and evacuated to the 56th General Hospital at Etaples, France, where he was admitted on 27th May 1918.

On 1st June 1918 Private Herringe was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Princess Elizabeth for evacuation to England with severe trench fever. He was admitted to the Reading War Hospital in England later that day.

Private Herringe was discharged from hospital on 5th July 1918, and given leave until 19th July 1918.  He marched in to the No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England, on 19th July 1918.

On the 10th of August 1918 Private Herringe was transferred to the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge Deverill, England.

On 19th August 1918 Private Herringe was transferred to the 12th Training Brigade at Codford, England.

On 19th November 1918 Private Herringe was admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England, suffering warts.  He was discharged on 6th December 1918 and returned to the 12th Training Battalion.

On 15th January 1919 private Herringe marched into the Concentration Depot at Codford to await his return to Australia.

Private Herringe departed Liverpool, England on 19th February 1919 for return to Australia aboard the H.T. Orca.

He arrived in Australia on 9th April 1919.

A letter in his file dated 1st February 1921, addressed to the O.C., Base Records, reported that he was ‘still on Hospital strength’.

H was discharged medically unfit on 14th May 1921.

 

[1] NAA B2455, HERRINGE J J J 5700

[2] ‘March O’er the Mountains’, (1915, November 12). The Blue Mountain Echo (NSW : 1909 – 1928), pp. 2-3. Retrieved September 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142

[3] ‘Soldiers on Leave’, (1915, November 27). Cowra Free Press (NSW : 1911 – 1921), p. 2. Retrieved October 3, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99695725

[4] ‘On Leave’, (1915, December 30). Cowra Free Press (NSW : 1911 – 1921), p. 2. Retrieved October 8, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99696209

[5]  First World War Embarkation Roll Joseph Jacob John Herringe, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/R1830996

 

Hector Andrew George LEE

Hector Andrew George LEE

Per his military service record (Depot), Hector Andrew George Lee was born at Redfern, N.S.W. [1]  He gave his age as 25 years and 10 months, his marital status as widower, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 199 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was left blank.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His next of kin was recorded on his Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad as his mother, Lucy Lee, Marquet Street, Rhodes N.S.W.

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Lieutenant Frank Middenway, when the Coo-ees were at Ashfield, on 11th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 16th  December 1915 Private Lee was charged at Liverpool Camp with being absent without leave for 10 days from 7th to 16th December, and also with being drunk on parade.

He was discharged on 20th December 1915 unlikely to become an efficient soldier.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, LEE HECTOR ANDREW GEORGE

Albert George HULBERT

Albert George HULBERT

Per his military service record (Depot), Albert George Hulbert was born at Wollongong, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 19 years and 7 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 2 inches tall, weight 128 lbs., with a fair complexion, bluish eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had 4 years previous military service [cadets].

His next of kin was recorded on his Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad  form as his father, Walter John Hulbert, Dunblane Street, Camperdown  N.S.W.   His father gave his permission for his son to join the A.I.F. in a letter dated 20th November 1915 in his service record.

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Lieutenant Edward J. Shaw, at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 29th January 1916 Private Hulbert was charged with being absent without leave for 3 days. He was fined 15 shillings.

On 7th February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave for 6 days. He was fined 30 shillings.

On 24th February 1916 Private Hulbert was charged again with being absent without leave from 17th to 24th February 1916.

As a result of his continuous absences he was discharged services no longer required, on 24th February 1916.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, HULBERT A G DEPOT

Edgar DAWSON

Edgar DAWSON

Per his military service record (Depot), Edgar Dawson was born at Bathurst, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 29 years and 7 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 8 ¼ inches tall, weight 116 lbs., with a dark complexion, bluish eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His next of kin was recorded on his Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad as his wife, Mrs E. [Coral Edith] Dawson, Post Office, Bathurst N.S.W.

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Lieutenant Frank Middenway, at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.

However, his Oath in his Attestation Paper was dated from 4th November 1915, and the date of 4th November 1915 was recorded at the bottom of the front page of his Attestation Paper near his signature, which was the day the Coo-ees marched from Hartley to Mt. Victoria.

An initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form dated 2nd November 1915 in his service record shows that he undertook a preliminary medical examination at Bathurst on 2nd November 1915, and “Route March Mt. Victoria” is written at the top of this form, so it appears he may have first presented to join the Coo-ee March at Mt. Victoria.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 15th January 1916 Private Dawson went absent without leave.

On 17th February 1916 he was posted as a deserter.

Private Dawson returned to the Liverpool Camp with a Doctor’s Certificate dated 19th February 1916 stating he had been suffering from Entero-colitis.

His service record shows that on 22nd February 1916 his wife sent a letter requesting his discharge on the grounds that she believed that he was ‘not physically robust to go to the front’.

On 25th February 1916 Private Dawson went before a Medical Board that found him fit for military service.

On 3rd March 1916 Private Dawson’s wife sent another letter requesting his discharge due to their three young children aged 7, 5, and 3 years,  being sick with measles.

She sent another letter on 7th March 1916 stating that she also was sick and was not able to look after their children on her own. These letters did not appear to have any effect, and on 13th March 1916 Private Dawson went absent without leave again.

On 13th April 1916 Private Dawson was apprehended by the Military Police and taken to Victoria Barracks.

On 20th April 1916 he was discharged from the Australian Imperial Force ‘at wife’s request’.

[1] NAA: B2455, DAWSON E

Robert Michael HICKEY

Robert Michael HICKEY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5099), Robert Michael Hickey was born at Carcoar, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 43 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as engine driver.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 156 lbs., with a medium complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He was attested by Lieutenant Frank Middenway at Ashfield on 11th November 1915. The Coo-ees held a recruitment meeting and stayed in Ashfield at the Drill Hall on the night of 11th November 1915 – the last night of the march.  The Certificate of Medical Examination in his service record shows that he first completed his medical on 11th November 1915 at Ashfield, however this date is crossed out, and replaced with the later date of 28th January 1916, at Liverpool Camp.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 4th February 1916 Private Hickey was charged with being Absent Without Leave from 16th  January to 24th January 1916.  He was recommended to be discharged, however he was fined and reinstated.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 29 Rocket Street, Bathurst, N.S.W, and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs E. Hickey, at the same address.

Private Hickey departed Sydney on the HMAT A16 Star of Victoria on 31st March 1916, as 16th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.[2]  He arrived in Egypt on the 8th May 1916.

On the 7th June 1916 Private Hickey left Alexandria aboard a transport ship bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 14th June 1916.

On 21st July he was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion in France from the 4th Division Base Depot at Etaples.

On 2nd August 1916 the 13th Battalion was training at Warloy, France, when Private Hickey was charged with being absent from Tattoo roll call on 31st July 1916. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 11th August 1916, Private Hickey was wounded in action in the vicinity of Pozieres, when the 13th Battalion was in the front line during the Battle of Pozieres.  (His wound is not described in his service record).  He was evacuated to the 1st Canadian General Hospital at Etaples, France, where he was admitted sick on 23rd August 1916.

On 30th August 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Stad Antwerpen at Calais for evacuation to England. Later that day he was admitted to the 4th Northern General Hospital at Lincoln, England.

On 25th September 1916 Private Hickey was transferred to the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Southall, England. He was discharged on 31st October 1916 and marched into the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 9th November 1916 Private Hickey was transferred to the 4th Training Battalion at Codford, England for “home service”.

On13th April 1917 Private Hickey was transferred back to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 4th May 1917 Private Hickey departed England from Devonport aboard the H.M.A.T. Runic bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 6th July 1917.  He was discharged Medically Unfit (Mitral Incompetence) on 11th August 1917.

Note: A page in his service record lists that he embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England with regimental no. 4798.  However, his name (and this regimental number) are not included on the nominal roll for the HMAT A15 Star of England. This initial regimental no. 4798 is crossed out on his Attestation Paper, and replaced with 5099.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, HICKEY R M 5099

[2] Australian War Memorial First World War Embarkation Rolls, ‘Robert Michael Hickey’, HMAT Star of Victoria A16, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1830731/

Bert KILDUFF

Bert KILDUFF

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4818), Bert Kilduff was born at Windsor, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 23 years and 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as butcher. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 5 inches tall, weight 9 stone, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and light brown hair.  His religious denomination was recorded as Church of England on his initial Attestation Paper (but was recorded as Roman Catholic on his second Attestation Paper).  He claimed that he had no previous military service.  He completed his medical examination on 12th November, 1915 at Ashfield, and was attested by Lieutenant S. Stirling at Ashfield on 12th November, 1915, along with two other Coo-ees, on the last day of the Coo-ee March, when the Coo-ees marched from Ashfield to Sydney.

After completing the Coee-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.  His initial period of service on his Statement of Service form is from 12th November 1915 until 15th January 1916.

A letter dated 22nd December 1915 in his service record, addressed to the C. O., 13th Battalion, stated that ‘This man was fined £5 at the Central Police Court for using obscene language’, and had ‘received a suit of plain clothes’.  Another letter dated 23rd December 1915 addressed to the C.O., 13th Battalion, from Lt. Colonel R. C. Simpson, A.A.G. A.I.F. Camp, stated that ‘This man’s clothes have been taken from him at Head Quarters’, and that ‘Attestation papers should be forwarded to me together with discharge papers made out in full, stating that he has been discharged as undesirable’.  On 15th January 1916 Private Kilduff was discharged Services no Longer Required.

Two days later, Bert Kilduff re-enlisted in the A.I.F.  He undertook another medical examination on 17th January 1916 at Sydney, and was attested at Liverpool on 18th January 1916.  He re-joined the Coo-ees at Liverpool Camp, as 15th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

While at Liverpool Camp, on 16th February 1916 Private Kilduff was charged with insubordination and fined.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Riverstone, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his aunt, Mrs C. [Cecily] Viney, Riverstone, N.S.W.  His “Date of joining” on his embarkation roll was 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

On 8th March 1916, Private Kilduff, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England.  He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Kilduff was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel El Kebir, Egypt.

On 27th April 1916 Private Kilduff was admitted to the 54th Casualty Clearing Station with Mumps.  He was discharged on 17th May 1916.

On 4th June 1916 Private Kilduff left Alexandria aboard the transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 21st June 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was at Strazeele, France, when Private Kilduff was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance with Tonsillitis.  He rejoined the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 25th June 1916 when it was working on constructing the Bois Grenier Line near Armentieres, France.

Private Kilduff served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion throughout its service on the Western Front, including Pozieres in August 1916, Mouquet Farm in September 1916, and Flers in October 1916.

On 4th November 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was training at Breilly, France, when Private Kilduff was charged with being absent without leave from 2100 till 2130 on 3rd November 1016.  He was fined 14 days pay.

On 9th March 1917 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was constructing railways and training in the vicinity of Longueval, France, when Private Kilduff was admitted to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance for dental treatment.  He was discharged on 17th March 1917, but was admitted to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance sick suffering urethral stricture on the same day.  On 18th March 1917 he was moved to the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station.  He was transferred by ambulance train to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Rouen, France, arriving on 21st of March 1917.

On 30th March 1917 Private Kilduff was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Gloucester Castle at Le Harve, France, for transfer to England.  He was admitted to the 5th Southern General Hospital at Portsmouth, England, on 31st March 1917.

On 20th June 1917 Private Kilduff was transferred the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 23rd June Private Kilduff was discharged from hospital to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.  On 29th June 1917 he was transferred to the No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 13th August 1917 Private Kilduff was admonished  with neglecting to obey Group Orders at Salisbury on 4th August 1917.

On 8th September 1917 Private Kilduff marched into the Overseas Training Brigade at Perham Downs, England.

On 11th October 1917 Private Kilduff departed Southampton bound for France.  On 13th October 1917 he marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 21st October 1917 Private Kilduff rejoined the 4th Pioneer Battalion when it was working on keeping the Zonnebeke Road in Belgium operational during the Third Battle of Ypres.

After serving with the 4th Pioneer Battalion on the Western Front for almost another year, on 9th October 1918 Private Kilduff was granted leave to England.  He rejoined the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 26th October 1918 whilst it was training at Ailly-sur-Somme, France.

On 10th February 1919 Private Kilduff was transferred to England for return to Australia.  He marched into the 3rd Training Brigade at Fovant, England, on 11th February 1919.

On 16th February 1919 Private Kilduff was admitted to the No. 2 Group Hospital with Influenza.  He was discharged on 26th February 1919.

On 13th April 1919 Private Kilduff commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.T. Commonwealth.  He arrived in Australia on 12th June 1919, and was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 27th July 1919.

[1] NAA: B2455, KILDUFF BERT

 

Joseph John WILLIAMS

Joseph John WILLIAMS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4912), Joseph John Williams was born at Woollahra, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 36 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farrier.  His description on Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 144 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and grey hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed that he had no previous military experience.  He completed his medical examination at Ashfield on 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield), and was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.

It is not known exactly where Joseph John Williams joined (or first presented to join) the Coo-ee March, but it may possibly have been before the 11th November 1915.  The Oath on his Attestation Paper was dated ‘from 6th November 1915’.  The “Date of Joining” recorded for Private Williams on his embarkation roll was 7th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 18th February 1916 Private Williams was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp for 3 days.  He was fined 25 Shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was C/o T. Stephenson, 1 Ruffe [sic] Street, Leichhardt, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs. E. M. [Esther Mary] Williams, at the same address.  The initial address recorded for his mother on his Attestation Paper was ‘Railway Parade Wentworth Falls N.S.W.’.

On 8th March 1916 Private Williams departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, and arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

It is not recorded in his service record when Private Williams left Egypt, but after some training in Egypt, he was sent to the 4th Training Battalion at Rollestone, England.

Private Williams departed England bound for France on 30th July 1916.  He marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, on 1st August 1916.

He was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion on 26th August 1916 when it was at Albert, France, preparing to re-enter the fighting around Pozieres.

On the 1st of January 1917 Private Williams was sent to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from a sore ankle. On 4th January 1917 he was moved to the 1st General Hospital at Etretat, France. On 26th January 1917 he was transferred to the 2nd Stationary Hospital at Amiens, France, with ICT right ankle.  He was discharged and returned to the 13th Battalion on 8th February 1917.

On 2nd March 1917 Private Williams was sent to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Scabies.  He was moved back to the 5th Rest station later that day with Influenza. On 7th March 1917 he was transferred to a Casualty Clearing Station with Trench Feet.  He was later moved to the 5th General Hospital at Rouen with Trench Fever.

On 12th March 1917 Private Williams was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Grantully Castle at Le Harve for evacuation to England.  He was admitted to the 2nd Southern General Hospital at Bristol, England, on the 13th of March 1917, with Trench Fever.

On 16th April 1917 Private Williams was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.  He was granted leave to report to the Number 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England, on 1st May 1917.

On 12th of May 1917 Private Williams was charged with being absent without leave in London from 3.30 p.m. on 1st May 1917 till 9.15 p.m. on 8th May 1917.  He was awarded 8 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 19 days pay.

On 4th August 1917 Private Williams was transferred to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 27th September 1917 Private Williams departed England aboard the H.T. Suevic bound for Australia, with Debility.  He arrived in Australia on 20th November 1917, and was discharged medically unfit on 25th December 1917.

[1] NAA B2455, WILLIAMS J J