Tag Archives: Ashfield recruits

Edgar Lewis CUDDEFORD

Edgar Lewis CUDDEFORD (MM)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5352), Edgar Lewis Cuddeford was born at Albury, N.S.W.[1]  (His name was recorded as Edward Lewis Cudderford on his embarkation roll).[2] He gave his age as 18 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as ‘engineering’ on his Attestation Paper. (His occupation was listed as ‘Engineer’ on his embarkation roll, however he was an engineering apprentice at Clyde Engineering Company, with 1 year and 11 months served of a 5 year apprenticeship, at the time he enlisted).[3]  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 2 ½ inches tall, weight 110 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to have 4 years previous military service in the Senior Cadets.

He completed his medical examination at Parramatta on 10th November 1915 (where the Coo-ees held a recruitment meeting, and stayed that evening). He was attested by Lieutenant Edward V. Steel at Ashfield on 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Yelta, Station Street, Harris Park, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his mother, Mrs M. J. [Mary Jane] Cuddeford, Mahonga Station, via Albury, N.S.W.[4]

On 9th April 1916 Private Cuddeford departed Sydney on the HMAT Nestor A71 with the 17th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion (along with several other Coo-ees), bound for Egypt.

Photograph of HMAT A71 Nestor loaded with troops on an earlier voyage, taken 11 October 1915. Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. PB0607.

On 20th May 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 7th June 1916 Private Cuddeford left Alexandria aboard the transport Huntspill, bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

He was sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 9th August 1916 Private Cuddeford was taken on strength of the 45th Battalion when it was manning support trenches in the vicinity of Pozieres, France.[5]

Private Cuddeford served with the 45th Battalion through its actions on the Western Front as a Battalion Headquarters runner, undertaking dispatch work.

He managed to survive the war unscathed. He stated in an oral history interview undertake later in his life (in 1983), that ‘I was fortunate that way’ and that ‘I never got wounded’.[6]

On 11th March 1918 Private Cuddeford was granted leave to England. He re-joined the 45th Battalion in France on 3rd April 1918.

On 18th July 1918 Private Cuddeford was sent to the 4th Army Rest Camp. He re-joined the Battalion on 28th July 1918.

On 18th September 1918 the 45th Battalion was engaged in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Le Verguier, France,  in which Private Cuddeford took part.

He was later awarded a Military Medal. The citation reads: ‘For bravery and devotion to duty during attack of 18th September, 1918, on old British outpost line near LE VERGUIER. Private Cuddeford is a Battalion Headquarters Runner, and during the advance, continually carried messages under adverse and most trying circumstances to various portions of the attacking line, always returning and giving voluntary and correct information of the situation. During consolidation, and after, owing to casualties in runners Private Cuddeford on numerous occasions volunteered to take messages, always proving most reliable and cheerfully carrying out his duties.’[7]

Notification of Private Cuddeford’s  award was gazetted in Second Supplement No. 31512,  to The London Gazette, 20th August 1919 (page 10585), and was also published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, no. 135, dated 11th December, 1919.[8]

On 30th January 1919 Private Cuddeford marched out of the 45th Battalion to commence his return to Australia.

On 10th February 1919 he departed Le Harve, France, bound for England. He arrived at Weymouth on 11th February 1919.

On 13th April 1919 Private Cuddeford departed England aboard the H.T. Commonwealth bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 12th June 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 7th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L

[2] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Edward Lewis Cuddeford,  5352.

[3] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L  ; FIRST TO BE KILLED. (1916, September 2). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 11. Retrieved April 8, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86069235

[4] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Edward Lewis Cuddeford,  5352.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/6 – August 1916.

[6] Edgar Lewis Cuddeford MM (5352) as a private 45th Infantry Battalion AIF, France 1916-1918, interviewed by Dr Alistair Thomson on 6 September 1983, Australian War Veterans of the Great War – 1914 – 1918 Oral history project, 6 September 1983, AWM Accession no. S01308, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C88153

[7] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L

[8] The London Gazette, 19 August 1919, Supplement 31512, p. 10585,  https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/31512/supplement/10585 ; Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation (1919, December 11). Commonwealth of Australia Gazette (National : 1901 – 1973), p. 2373. Retrieved April 8, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232512820

 

 

 

Thomas LIPSCOMBE

Thomas LIPSCOMBE

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4826), Thomas Lipscombe was born at Collingwood, Victoria.[1] He gave his age as 35 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was [height not recorded], weight 161 lbs., with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His ‘Joined on’ date on his Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form was 9th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Springwood to Penrith). The Oath to the taken by person being enlisted section on his Attestation Paper was dated from 9th November 1915. His Statement of Service in his service record is also dated from 9th November 1915, so it appears he may have joined the Coo-ee March on this day.

He completed his medical examination at Ashfield on 11th November 1915, and was attested at Ashfield by Lieutenant F. Middenway on the 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 6th January 1916 Private Lipscombe was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp from 9th December 1915 to 3rd January 1916. He was fined.

On 5th February 1916 Private Lipscombe was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp for 5 days. He was fined 25 shillings.

The Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent reported on 3rd March 1916 that ‘’Private T. Lipscombe has been in town the past few days taking farewell of his friends prior to preceeding to the front, whither he expects to sail next week’.[2]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was his address was Australian Hotel, Dubbo.[3]  His next of kin was listed as friend, ‘P. J. Kennay’, Australian Hotel, Dubbo, N.S.W.  [This was probably P.J. Kennedy, licencee of the Austalian Hotel, Dubbo].[4]

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

On 8th March 1916 Private Lipscombe departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England along with many of the other Coo-ees.  He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Lipscombe was transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 22nd May 1916 he was transferred to the 110th Battery.

On 1st  June 1916 he was designated a Driver, and transferred to the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.

On 5th June 1916 Driver Lipscombe left Alexandria aboard the HMT Oriana bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 13th June 1916.

On 22nd January 1918 Driver Lipscombe went on leave to Paris.  He returned to the 10th Field Artillery Brigade on the 3rd of February 1918.

However, he had overstayed his leave, and had been due back on the 30th of January 1918.  He was arrested and held in detention.  Driver Lipscombe was found guilty of being absent without leave at a Court Martial held on 3th February 1918.  He was awarded 28 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 42 days pay.

On 18th August 1918 Driver Lipscombe was granted leave to England. He returned to the 10th Field Artillery Brigade in France on 9th September 1918.

On 3rd December 1918 Driver Lipscombe departed France, bound for England to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at Folkestone, England, later that day.

On 9th January 1919 Driver Lipscombe was charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 7th January 1919 till 2120 on 8th January 1919. He was fined 1 days pay.

Driver Lipscombe departed Liverpool, England on 19th February 1919 for return to Australia aboard the H.T. Orca.

He arrived in Sydney on 3rd April 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 18th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, LIPSCOMBE THOMAS

[2] Our Soldiers. (1916, March 3). Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent (NSW : 1887 – 1932), p. 1. Retrieved April 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228634920

[3] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Thomas Lipscombe, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[4] AUSTRALIAN HOTEL. (1917, December 4). Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent (NSW : 1887 – 1932), p. 1. Retrieved April 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228195676

 

Jack Graham WIGGINS

Jack Graham WIGGINS

Pte. J. Wiggins (Sunday Times, 8/10/1916, p. 9)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4918), Jack Graham Wiggins was born at Springwood, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 9 stone 7 lbs., with a dark complexion, dark grey eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His “Joined on” date on his Attestation Paper was recorded as 9th November 1915, the day the Coo-ees marched from Springwood to Penrith.

He completed his medical examination at Springwood on 9th November 1915, but was not attested until 11th November 1915 at Ashfield (when the Coo-ees were at Ashfield).

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 4th January 1916 Private Wiggins was charged with being absent without leave for 7 days. He was fined.

On 21st February 1916 he was charged with being absent from Parade on 19th  February 1916. He was fined.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Sassafras Road, Springwood, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, E. Wiggins, at the same address.[2]

On 8th March 1916 Private Wiggins, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Wiggins left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Wiggins served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France, in July 1916, then as it moved to Pozieres in early August 1916.

From the 5th August 1916 until the 8th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was holding front line trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, France, until they were relieved, and moved back into support trenches.[3] On 8th August 1916 Private Wiggins was wounded in action, with a gunshot wound to his face.  He was evacuated to the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station on 9th August 1916. On 10th August 1916 he was admitted to the 2nd Australian General Hospital at Wimereux, France.

On 14th August 1916 Private Wiggins was sent by Hospital Ship from Le Havre to England, where he was admitted to the Northampton War Hospital.

On 6th October 1916 he reported back from leave to No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England.  He then marched in to the 12th Training Battalion camp at Codford.

On 14th October 1916 Private Wiggins departed England for France.

On 5th October 1916 Private Wiggins marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 29th October 1916 he re-joined the 45th Battalion when it was training at Brucamps, France.

On 5th December 1916 the 45th Battalion was training at Dernacourt, France.[4] On this day Private Wiggins was charged with being absent from parade (fatigue work). He was awarded 168 hours Field Punishment No. 2.

On 23rd December 1916 the 45th Battalion was training at Flesselles, France.[5]  Private Wiggins was charged with being absent without leave from Parade at Dernacourt on 11th December 1916. He was fined 7 days pay.

On 29th December 1916 Private Wiggins was sent to hospital.  On 1st January 1917 the 45th Battalion was still training at Flesselles, France, when Private Wiggins was evacuated to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance with Trench Feet. He re-joined the 45th Battalion on 15th January 1917 when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Guedecourt, France.

On 12th November 1917 the 45th Battalion was training at Erny St Julien, France.[6] On this day Private Wiggins was charged in a Field General Court Martial with while on active service, deserting his Majesty’s Service. Private Wiggins pleaded not guilty. He was found not guilty of desertion, but guilty of being absent without leave from 10 am on 19th October 1917 to 4 pm on 20th October 1917. The 45th Battalion had been in the front line around Ypres, Belgium, at the time.[7] He was awarded 90 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 49 days pay. 65 days of the Field Punishment was later remitted.

On 28th March 1918 the 45th Battalion was in support and front line trenches in the vicinity of Dernacourt, France, during the First Battle of Dernacourt, when Private Wiggins was wounded in action for the second time, receiving a shrapnel wound to his left thigh.[8]  He was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance. The next day he was moved back to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station, then admitted  to the 20th General Hospital at Camiers, France.

On 1st April 1918 Private Wiggins was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Ville De Liege for evacuation to England. Upon arrival he was admitted to the Norfolk War Hospital at Norwich, England.

On 9th May 1918 Private Wiggins was discharged from hospital, and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England, on 23rd May 1918.

On 16th June 1918 Private Wiggins was admitted to the Sutton Veny Military Hospital suffering Influenza. He was discharged on 24th June 1918.

On 6th July 1918 Private Wiggins was transferred to the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge Deverill, England. On 3rd August 1918 Private Wiggins departed Folkestone, England, bound for France. On 5th August 1918 he marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 11th August 1918 Private Wiggins re-joined the 45th Battalion when it was resting in the vicinity of Sailly-Laurette, France.[9]

On 20th January 1919 the 45th Battalion was at Hastiere, Belgium, when Private Wiggins was charged with using insolent language Towards an NCO. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 14 days pay.

On 30th January 1919 Private Wiggins was one of a party of 50 men from the 45th Battalion sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France, to commence the journey to Australia for demobilisation.

On 10th February 1918 Private Wiggins departed Le Harve for England, arriving at Weymouth on 11th February 1919, where he marched into the 3rd Training Brigade.

On 31st March 1919 Private Wiggins was declared an Illegal Absentee, having been absent without leave from 3rd March 1919.

On3rd July 1919 a court martial was held where Private Wiggins was charged with being absent without leave from 0001 3rd March 1919 till reporting back at 1700 on 11th June 1919. He was found guilty and sentenced to 4 months detention. On 28th July 1919 Private Wiggins was admitted to the Lewes Detention Barracks, England.

On 21st August 1919 Private Wiggins was discharged from the Lewes Detention Barracks, with the remainder of his sentence remitted.

On 22nd August 1919 Private Wiggins departed England bound for Australia aboard the HMAT  Anchises.

He arrived in Sydney on 13th October 1919, and was discharged the same day Services No Longer Required.

A welcome home concert was held for ‘J. Wiggins’ and several other local soldiers at Springwood on  27th December 1919.[10]

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WIGGINS JACK GRAHAM

[2] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Jack Graham Wiggins, 4918.

[3] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, August 1916.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, December 1916.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, December 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, November 1917.

[7] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, October 1917.

[8] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, March 1918.

[9] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, August 1918.

[10] SPRINGWOOD. (1919, December 26). The Blue Mountain Echo (NSW : 1909 – 1928), p. 7. Retrieved January 26, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108249963

 

Richard EVANS

Richard EVANS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5368), Richard Evans was born at Deniliquin, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 26 years and 3 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 154 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway, at Ashfield on 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Robinson Street, Croydon, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his mother, Mrs A. [Annie] Evans, at the same address.[2]

On 9th April 1916 Private Evans departed Sydney on the HMAT Nestor A71 with the 17th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion (along with several other Coo-ees), bound for Egypt.

Photograph of HMAT A71 Nestor loaded with troops on an earlier voyage, taken 11 October 1915. Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. PB0607.

He arrived in Egypt on 15th May 1916. He was immediately admitted sick to the 31st General Hospital at Port Said, Egypt.

On 21st July 1916 he was transferred to the Lowland Field Ambulance, then was admitted to the Government School Hospital at Port Said. He was discharged on 25th July 1916.

On 6th August 1916 Private Evans left Alexandria aboard the Transport Megantic, bound for England.

On 19th August 1916 he was admitted sick to the Military Hospital at Fargo, England.

On 24th August 1916 Private Evans was admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England.

On 17th November 1916 he was transferred to the Military Hospital at Parkhouse, England.

He was discharged from Hospital on 28th February 1917, and marched into the No. 4 Command Depot at Wareham, England.

On 12th March 1917 Private Evans was charged with absenting himself from Parade on 9th March 1917 without permission. He was awarded 48 hours detention.

On 27th March 1917 he was charged with neglecting to obey Depot Orders on 26th March 1917. He was awarded 3 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 3rd April 1917 he was charged with being absent without leave from 30th March 1917 till 2nd April 1917. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2, and fined 11 days pay.

On 7th April 1917 Private Evans marched into the Drafting and Hardening Depot at Perham Downs, England.

On 15th April 1917 he marched into the 4th Training Battalion at Codford, England, under escort.

On 8th May 1917 Private Evans was charged with breaking isolation, drunkenness and being absent without leave from 8 a.m. 7th May 1917 till 10 p.m. 7th May 1917. He was awarded 10 days Field Punishment No. 2, and fined 11 days pay.

On 9th May 1917 Private Evans departed Folkestone, England, bound for France. He marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, on 10th May 1917.

Private Evans joined the 13th Battalion on 13th May 1917, when it was training at Ribemont, France.[3]

Four days later, on 17th May 1917 Private Evans was evacuated to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station with a condition not yet diagnosed. On 21st May 1917 he was transferred to the 2nd Australian General Hospital at Wimereux, France, with Bronchitis and Influenza.

On 24th May 1917 Private Evans was placed aboard Hospital Ship Jan Breydel at Boulogne for evacuation to England. He was admitted to the Duston War Hospital at Northampton, England. On 29th August 1917 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England, with Influenza.

He was discharged on 3rd September 1917 and marched into the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

Private Evans commenced his return to Australia on 31st October 1917 aboard the H.M.A.T. Berrima, arriving in Australia on 30th December 1918.

He was discharged medically unfit on 21st February 1918, with defective vision.

He re-enlisted in the A.I.F. at Liverpool on 12th April 1918, and was assigned to Camp Supply Depot for home service.  Driver Evans was discharged at his own request on 4th May 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, EVANS R

[2] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Richard Evans,  5368.

[3] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, May 1917.

Charles Edward BOW

Charles Edward BOW

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4735), Charles Edward Bow was born at Parramatta, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 29 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as bricklayer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 3 ½ inches tall, weight 9 stone 6 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Congregational. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination at Ashfield on 12th November 1915, and was attested at Ashfield by Lieutenant S. Stilling on the 12th November 1915 (on the last day of the Coo-ee March, the day the Coo-ees marched from Ashfield to Sydney).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 22nd December 1915 Private Bow was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp on the 17th, 18th and 19th of December 1915. He was fined.

On 8th February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp on the 1st and 2nd of February 1916. He was fined.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was his address was C/o Mrs J. Langan, Tolorno, Coventry Road, Homebush, N.S.W.  His next of kin was listed as his father, G.[George] Bow, Phillip Street, Parramatta, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Bow departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England along with many of the other Coo-ees, arriving in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Bow was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-El-Kebir, Egypt.

On 4th June 1916 Private Bow left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Bow served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France until on 20th September 1917 when Private Bow was admitted to the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station with Malaria. On 27th September 1917 he was transferred to the 2nd Stationary Hospital at Abbeville, France, with a fissure.

On 2nd October 1917 he was placed aboard a Hospital Ship bound for England. He was admitted to the 1st Southern General Hospital at Birmingham, England with severe Haemorrhoids.

On 11th October 1917 Private Bow was discharged from Hospital and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command depot at Sutton Veny, England, on 25th October 1917.

On 3rd November 1917 Private Bow was admitted to the Sutton Veny Military Hospital suffering Asthma. He was discharged to No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 9th of November 1917.

On 4th December 1917 Private Bow was found by a Medical Board to have chronic bronchitis.

On 29th December 1917 Private Bow marched out to No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 30th January 1918 Private Bow commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.T. Euripides for medical discharge from Plymouth, England.

He arrived in Australia on 21st March 1918.

He was discharged medically unfit with chronic bronchitis at Sydney on 4th May 1918.

 

[1] NAA B2455, BOW C E

Robert AYRES

Robert AYRES

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4729), Robert Ayres was born at Surrey Hills, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 41 years and 11 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as cab driver.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height  5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 140 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Wesleyan.  He claimed to have no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.  He was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway when the Coo-ees were at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 2 Mill Street, Croydon, N.S.W.[2]  His next of kin was listed as his wife, Mrs M. [Martha] Ayres, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Ayres, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 7th of June 1916 Private Ayres left Alexandria aboard the H.T. Ionian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

He joined the 13th Battalion in France on 19th August 1916.

Ten days later, on 29th August 1916 the 13th Battalion was in action around Mouquet Farm, France.  During the previous 24 hour period the 13th Battalion was under heavy artillery fire, and had suffered a total of 18 killed, 99 wounded and 33 missing.[3] Private Ayres was one of those wounded, being evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station suffering Shell Shock.

On 6th September 1916 Private Ayres was sent to the 3rd Convalescent Depot at Etaples, France.

On 9th September 1916 he marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples.

On 7th January 1917 Private Ayres re-joined the 13th Battalion when it was at Mametz, France.[4]

On 29th January 1917 Private Ayres was detached for duty at the Corps Baths at Heilly, France.

On 20th April 1917 Private Ayres was sent to hospital. He re-joined the 13th Battalion on 26th April 1917, when it was training at Ribemont, France.[5]

On 14th September 1917 Private Ayres was detached from the 13th Battalion for duty at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He arrived on 16th September 1917.

On 26th September 1917 Private Ayres was transferred to England.  He arrived at Weymouth, England, on 27th September 1917, where he marched into the No. 2 Command Depot.

Private Ayres departed England on 31st October 1917 for return to Australia, suffering senility, aboard the H.M.A.T. Berrima.

He disembarked at Sydney on 31st December 1917.

Private Ayres was discharged medically unfit on 31st January 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, AYRES R

[2] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Robert Ayres, 4729.

[3] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, August 1916.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, January 1917.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, April 1917.

William Charles ELLERY

William Charles ELLERY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4769), William Charles Ellery was born at Castlemaine, Victoria.[1]  He gave his age as 43 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 168 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Wesleyan.  He claimed to have no previous military service.

In the Dunedoo Chronicle section of the Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative, it was reported that a large crowd farewelled Mr. W. C. Ellery at the local train station, ‘who left by train for Lithgow in the hope of joining Hitchen’s “Coo-ees”’.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.  He was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway when the Coo-ees were at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.  His ‘Oath to be taken by person being enlisted’ section on his Attestation Paper was dated from 2nd November 1915 (when the Coo-ees were in Lithgow).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Dunedoo, N.S.W.[3]  His next of kin was listed as friend, W. Miller, C/o A. Yeo, Merrygoen, Dunedoo, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Ellery, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 Private Ellery was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 18th June 1916 Private Ellery left Alexandria aboard the Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 29th June 1916.

Private Ellery served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 31st December 1916  the 45th Battalion was training at Flesslers, France when Private Elley was evacuated sick. On 11th January 1917 Private Ellery was admitted to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance suffering Rheumatism. He was discharged on 16th January 1917, and rejoined the 45th Battalion when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Gudecourt, France.

On 23rd April 1917 the 45th Battalion was training at Bresle, France, when Private Ellery was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Chronic Rheumatism.

He was discharged to duty on 4th May 1917, and returned to the 45th Battalion on 6th May 1917, when it was still at Bresle, France.

On 14th May 1917 Private Ellery was admitted to the 7th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Chronic Rheumatism. He was discharged on 25th May 1917, and rejoined the 45th Battalion when it was at Neuve Eglise, France, providing working parties in the rear area of the front.

On 12th December 1917 the 45th Battalion was training at Haut Allaines, France, when Private Ellery was evacuated sick. On 13th December 1917 he was evacuated to the 9th General Hospital at Rouen, France, suffering from Rheumatic Fever.

On 14th December 1917 Private Ellery was placed aboard a Hospital Ship for evacuation to England.

On 15th December 1917 he was admitted to the University War Hospital at Southampton, England suffering Chronic Rheumatism.

On 9th January 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

On 13th January 1918 Private Ellery was discharged from hospital, and marched into the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

Private Ellery commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.T. Dunvegan Castle on 13th March 1918.  On 21st May 1918 he embarked at Captetown, South Africa, aboard H.T. Tofua.

He disembarked at Melbourne on 14th June 1918.

He was discharged medically unfit with chronic rheumatic arthritis on 3rd August 1918.

Note: It appears from a newspaper article about his welcome home to Dunedoo on 27th November 1918 that the surname of “Ellery” that he enlisted under may have been an assumed name, and that his surname was actually “Burly” or “Burley”.[4]

 

[1] NAA: B2455, ELLERY W C

[2] ‘The Doings Of The West’, Gilgandra Weekly (NSW : 1915 – 1929), 12 November 1915, p. 15. Retrieved November 12, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119922120

[3] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, William Charles Ellery.

[4] ‘Presentation to Returned Soldiers’, Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative, 5 December 1918, p. 11. Retrieved November 12, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article157145589

 

Joseph Jacob John HERRINGE

Joseph Jacob John HERRINGE

Joseph Herringe and his mother Mrs Bridget Herringe (Photograph courtesy of Marie Cribbin)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5700), Joseph Jacob John Herringe was born at Cowra, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as fitter.  He stated he has been apprenticed as a gasfitter for 3 years to A. Wright at Cowra. He claimed that he had 2 years previous military service with the 41st Infantry at Cowra.

His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 147 lbs., with a ruddy complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.

He completed his medical examination on 11th November 1915 at Ashfield, and was attested by Lieutenant Frank Middenway at Ashfield on 11th November 1915. His date of joining was recorded as 11th November 1915, the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield.

It appears that Joseph Herringe may have first presented to join the Co-ees at Katoomba, as a ‘J. Herringe’ was listed in The Blue Mountain Echo on 12th November 1915 as ‘one of the lads who answered the call, and marched out [of Katoomba] with the “Coo-ees” on their triumphant march to the sea’.[2]  (Several of the Coo-ees listed in this article did not undertake their attestation and medical examination until further along the march, or until they reached Liverpool Camp).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Private Herringe, along with Private Colin Wren, ‘of the Coo-ees’, were ‘among the lads in khaki’ reported to be in Cowra on leave in the Cowra Free Press on 27th November 1915.[3]

They were both reported being on leave again ‘spending the festive season with their relatives and friends’ in the Cowra Free Press on 30th December 1915.[4]

On his embarkation roll Private Herringe’s address at time of enrolment was Grenfell Road, Cowra, N.S.W. His next of kin was recorded as his mother, Mrs B. [Bridget] M. Herringe, at the same address.[5]

On 3rd May 1916 Private Herringe departed Sydney on the HMAT A46 Clan McGillivray, along with fellow Coo-ees Private Saunders and Private Keating, as part of the 18th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Clan MacGillivray A46

He arrived in Egypt in June 1916.

On 6th August 1916 Private Herringe departed Egypt bound for England aboard the Transport Megantic.

He was sent to the 4th Training Battalion at Rollerstone, England.

On 23rd September 1916 Private Herringe departed England bound for France.

He marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France on 24th September 1916.

He was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion on the 4th of October 1916 whilst it was training and reorganising in the vicinity of Reninghelst, Belgium.

On 18th October 1916 the 13th Battalion was relieving the 15th Battalion in the front line in the vicinity of Zonnebeke, Belgium, when Private Herringe was wounded by mustard gas poisoning.  He was moved back to the 11th Australian Field Ambulance, then to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance.

On 20th October 1917 Private Herringe was sent to the 2nd Canadian Casualty Clearing Station. On 22nd October 1917 he was admitted to the 16th General Hospital at Le Treport, France.

On 5th November 1917 Private Herringe was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Panama for evacuation to England. On 6th November 1917 he was admitted to the 1st Southern General Hospital at Birmingham, England, with status ‘gassed severe’.

He was discharged on 15th November 1917, and marched into the No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 12th February 1918 Private Herringe was transferred to the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge Deverill, England.

On 23rd February 1918 Private Herringe was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 21st February 1918 until 8.30 a.m. on 23rd February 1918. He was awarded 4 days field punishment no. 2, and fined 5 days pay.

On 4th March 1918 Private Herringe departed Southampton, England bound for France.  He marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve on 5th March 1918.

He re-joined the 13th Battalion on 9th March 1918 whilst it was training in the vicinity of Neuve Eglise, France.

On 28th April 1918 Private Herringe was sent to the 14th Australian Field Ambulance then moved to the 20th Casualty Clearance Station with a condition not yet diagnosed. He was discharged and returned to the 13th Battalion on 30th April 1918 when it was at Glisy, France.

On 25th May 1918 the 13th Battalion was conducting training at Allonville, France, when Private Herringe was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance suffering pyrexia.  He was moved back to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station. On 26th May 1918 he was placed aboard the 20th Ambulance Train and evacuated to the 56th General Hospital at Etaples, France, where he was admitted on 27th May 1918.

On 1st June 1918 Private Herringe was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Princess Elizabeth for evacuation to England with severe trench fever. He was admitted to the Reading War Hospital in England later that day.

Private Herringe was discharged from hospital on 5th July 1918, and given leave until 19th July 1918.  He marched in to the No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England, on 19th July 1918.

On the 10th of August 1918 Private Herringe was transferred to the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge Deverill, England.

On 19th August 1918 Private Herringe was transferred to the 12th Training Brigade at Codford, England.

On 19th November 1918 Private Herringe was admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England, suffering warts.  He was discharged on 6th December 1918 and returned to the 12th Training Battalion.

On 15th January 1919 private Herringe marched into the Concentration Depot at Codford to await his return to Australia.

Private Herringe departed Liverpool, England on 19th February 1919 for return to Australia aboard the H.T. Orca.

He arrived in Australia on 9th April 1919.

A letter in his file dated 1st February 1921, addressed to the O.C., Base Records, reported that he was ‘still on Hospital strength’.

H was discharged medically unfit on 14th May 1921.

 

[1] NAA B2455, HERRINGE J J J 5700

[2] ‘March O’er the Mountains’, (1915, November 12). The Blue Mountain Echo (NSW : 1909 – 1928), pp. 2-3. Retrieved September 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142

[3] ‘Soldiers on Leave’, (1915, November 27). Cowra Free Press (NSW : 1911 – 1921), p. 2. Retrieved October 3, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99695725

[4] ‘On Leave’, (1915, December 30). Cowra Free Press (NSW : 1911 – 1921), p. 2. Retrieved October 8, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99696209

[5]  First World War Embarkation Roll Joseph Jacob John Herringe, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/R1830996

 

Hector Andrew George LEE

Hector Andrew George LEE

Per his military service record (Depot), Hector Andrew George Lee was born at Redfern, N.S.W. [1]  He gave his age as 25 years and 10 months, his marital status as widower, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 199 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was left blank.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His next of kin was recorded on his Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad as his mother, Lucy Lee, Marquet Street, Rhodes N.S.W.

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Lieutenant Frank Middenway, when the Coo-ees were at Ashfield, on 11th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 16th  December 1915 Private Lee was charged at Liverpool Camp with being absent without leave for 10 days from 7th to 16th December, and also with being drunk on parade.

He was discharged on 20th December 1915 unlikely to become an efficient soldier.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, LEE HECTOR ANDREW GEORGE

Albert George HULBERT

Albert George HULBERT

Per his military service record (Depot), Albert George Hulbert was born at Wollongong, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 19 years and 7 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 2 inches tall, weight 128 lbs., with a fair complexion, bluish eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had 4 years previous military service [cadets].

His next of kin was recorded on his Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad  form as his father, Walter John Hulbert, Dunblane Street, Camperdown  N.S.W.   His father gave his permission for his son to join the A.I.F. in a letter dated 20th November 1915 in his service record.

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Lieutenant Edward J. Shaw, at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 29th January 1916 Private Hulbert was charged with being absent without leave for 3 days. He was fined 15 shillings.

On 7th February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave for 6 days. He was fined 30 shillings.

On 24th February 1916 Private Hulbert was charged again with being absent without leave from 17th to 24th February 1916.

As a result of his continuous absences he was discharged services no longer required, on 24th February 1916.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, HULBERT A G DEPOT