Tag Archives: HMAT A15 Star of England

Patrick GOOLEY

Patrick GOOLEY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4781), Patrick Gooley was born at Burrowa, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 43 years and 6 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as contractor. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 11 stone 11 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

Gooley was reported in the Wellington Times as one of the men who enlisted with the Coo-ees at Wellington.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Wellington). He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 20th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Stuart Town to Euchareena).

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 4th January 1916 Private Gooley was charged with being absent without leave from 16th December 1915 to 17th December 1915, and from 20th  December 1915 to 3rd January 1916.  He was fined 10 shillings, and forfeited 12 days pay.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 56 George Street, Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his wife, Mrs C. Gooley, Glanmere [sic], via Bathurst, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Gooley departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Gooley left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Gooley served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 29th November 1916 he was detached for duty with the Australian Army Service Corps.

He went on leave from France on 29th August 1917 to 8th September 1917.

Private Gooley served with the 26th Australian Army Service Corps until he re-joined the 45th Battalion on 7th October 1918.

On 17th October 1918 he was sent to the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Harve, France, for a Medical Board, where he was classed as having senility.

On 31st October 1918 he was transferred to England.

On 1st November 1918 he marched into the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 4th December 1918 Private Gooley departed England aboard the H.M.A.T. Somerset, bound for Australia for medical discharge.

He arrived in Australia on 16th January 1919.

He was discharged from the A.I.F. medically unfit on 4th February 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, GOOLEY P

[2] HITCHEN’S COO-EES. (1915, October 18). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388424

 

Thomas LIPSCOMBE

Thomas LIPSCOMBE

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4826), Thomas Lipscombe was born at Collingwood, Victoria.[1] He gave his age as 35 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was [height not recorded], weight 161 lbs., with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His ‘Joined on’ date on his Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form was 9th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Springwood to Penrith). The Oath to the taken by person being enlisted section on his Attestation Paper was dated from 9th November 1915. His Statement of Service in his service record is also dated from 9th November 1915, so it appears he may have joined the Coo-ee March on this day.

He completed his medical examination at Ashfield on 11th November 1915, and was attested at Ashfield by Lieutenant F. Middenway on the 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 6th January 1916 Private Lipscombe was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp from 9th December 1915 to 3rd January 1916. He was fined.

On 5th February 1916 Private Lipscombe was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp for 5 days. He was fined 25 shillings.

The Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent reported on 3rd March 1916 that ‘’Private T. Lipscombe has been in town the past few days taking farewell of his friends prior to preceeding to the front, whither he expects to sail next week’.[2]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was his address was Australian Hotel, Dubbo.[3]  His next of kin was listed as friend, ‘P. J. Kennay’, Australian Hotel, Dubbo, N.S.W.  [This was probably P.J. Kennedy, licencee of the Austalian Hotel, Dubbo].[4]

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

On 8th March 1916 Private Lipscombe departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England along with many of the other Coo-ees.  He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Lipscombe was transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 22nd May 1916 he was transferred to the 110th Battery.

On 1st  June 1916 he was designated a Driver, and transferred to the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.

On 5th June 1916 Driver Lipscombe left Alexandria aboard the HMT Oriana bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 13th June 1916.

On 22nd January 1918 Driver Lipscombe went on leave to Paris.  He returned to the 10th Field Artillery Brigade on the 3rd of February 1918.

However, he had overstayed his leave, and had been due back on the 30th of January 1918.  He was arrested and held in detention.  Driver Lipscombe was found guilty of being absent without leave at a Court Martial held on 3th February 1918.  He was awarded 28 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 42 days pay.

On 18th August 1918 Driver Lipscombe was granted leave to England. He returned to the 10th Field Artillery Brigade in France on 9th September 1918.

On 3rd December 1918 Driver Lipscombe departed France, bound for England to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at Folkestone, England, later that day.

On 9th January 1919 Driver Lipscombe was charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 7th January 1919 till 2120 on 8th January 1919. He was fined 1 days pay.

Driver Lipscombe departed Liverpool, England on 19th February 1919 for return to Australia aboard the H.T. Orca.

He arrived in Sydney on 3rd April 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 18th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, LIPSCOMBE THOMAS

[2] Our Soldiers. (1916, March 3). Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent (NSW : 1887 – 1932), p. 1. Retrieved April 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228634920

[3] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Thomas Lipscombe, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[4] AUSTRALIAN HOTEL. (1917, December 4). Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent (NSW : 1887 – 1932), p. 1. Retrieved April 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228195676

 

Andrew George LENNOX

Andrew George LENNOX

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4824),  Andrew George Lennox was born at Bourke, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 19 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as railway porter.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 185 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and medium brown hair.  His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

A send-off was held on Thursday 28th October 1915 at the Court House Hotel in Cobar for Andrew Lennox, Norman Francisco, and brothers Walter and Robert Mitchell, and they were then cheered by many friends when they left Cobar by train on Saturday 30th October 1915 to join the A.I.F.[2]

All four of them completed their medical examinations, and were attested, at Dubbo on Monday 2nd November 1915, (the day the Coo-ees were at Lithgow).

Andrew Lennox then traveled by train with these three other Cobar men to catch up with the Coo-ees.  They were waiting to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees arrived at Mt. Victoria three days later, on Thursday 4th November 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Lennox went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Private Lennox and fellow Coo-ee Private Francisco while home on leave were given a farewell at the Star Hotel in Cobar on Saturday, 1st January 1916.[4]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Marshall Street, Cobar, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his father, A. Lennox, at the same address.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Lennox, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel El Kebir, Egypt.

On 4th June 1916 Private Lennox left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

He served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France and Belgium.

On 1st September 1918 Private Lennox went on leave to England.

He returned to the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 17th September 1918, and was transferred to the 4th Machine Gun Battalion in France.

On 16th November 1918 Private Lennox was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance sick. He was moved back to the 50th Casualty Clearing Station on 17th November 1918.

On 22nd November 1918 he was placed aboard the 2nd Ambulance Train and moved to the 2nd Convalescent Depot, arriving on 23rd November 1918. On 24th November 1918 he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital at Le Harve, France, where he was admitted on 25th November 1918.

On 26th December 1918 Private Lennox was placed aboard a Hospital Ship for evacuation to England.  He was admitted to the Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England, on 27th December 1918.

On 10th May 1919 he was discharged from hospital, and sent to the Convalescent Training Depot at Parkhouse, England.

On 12th May 1919 Private Lennox was sent back to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford sick.

He was discharged from hospital on 21st July 1919, and sent to the No. 2 Group at Sutton Veny, England.

On 22nd August 1919 Private Lennox left England on the H.T.t Anchises bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 13th October 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 5th December 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, LENNOX ANDREW GEORGE

[2] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 30 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136723099

[3] Summary’, Western Age, 6 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136724708

[4] Valedictory. (1916, January 4). Western Age (Dubbo, NSW : 1914 – 1932), p. 2. Retrieved February 18, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136725949

[5] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Andrew George Lennox, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

Albert BROWN

Albert BROWN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4734), Albert Brown was born at Bellabay, Ireland.[1]  He gave his age as 18 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as baker.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 8 stone 10 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was recorded as Presbyterian. He claimed that he had 3 years and 4 months previous military service  undertaking compulsory training [cadets].

A letter dated 11th November 1915 from his father T. Brown in his service record gave consent for him to enlist.

He completed his medical examination on 11th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested by Lieutenant R. Howe at Parramatta on 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Miller Road, Old Guildford N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, T. Brown, at the same address.[2]

He was one of the soldiers given a farewell at the Elite Hall in Guildford on Thursday 9th December 1915 by the Guildford Patriotic Committee (along with fellow Coo-ee Allan Colquhoun), where they were each presented with a sheepskin vest and money belt.[3]

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

On 8th March 1916, Private Brown, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Brown was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company at Tel-el-Kebir in Egypt (along with fellow Coo-ees Private Richardson, Private Megarrity, Private Lloyd and Private Spicer).

On 17th June 1916 Private Brown left Alexandria aboard a transport bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 25th June 1916.

On 21st April 1917 Private Brown was seconded to the 2nd Cooking School in France.

He re-joined 2nd ANZAC Corps Cyclist Battalion on 5th May 1917. (The 5th Division Cyclist Company had been moved into the Battalion upon its formation in July 1916).

On 22nd July 1917 Private Brown went on leave. He re-joined to the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 6th August 1917.

On 3rd December 1917 Private Brown was detached to the 2nd ANZAC Anti-Aircraft unit. He re-joined the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 9th December 1917.

On 16th January 1918 Private Brown was taken on strength of the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion.

On 5th June 1918 Private Brown was detached to the Corps Prisoner of War Compound.

On 29th August 1918 he was granted leave to England.

Private Brown re-joined the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion in France on 15th September 1918.

A Certified Extract of a Marriage Certificate in his service record states that 21 year of Albert Brown, soldier, married 18 year old Regina Anne Joseph Mahien on 23rd April 1919 at Andeslues, Belgium.

On 6th May 1919 Private Brown departed France bound for England, to begin his return to Australia. Private Brown arrived at Southampton on 7th June 1919, and marched into the No. 2 Group the same day.

On 12th July 1919 Private Brown departed England aboard the H.T. Indarra bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 9th September 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 27th December 1919 ‘Disability Not Stated’.

Note: After returning to N.S.W. after the First World War, Albert Brown returned to Belgium to live with his Belgian wife.[4] He became a Prisoner of War in the Second World War, after Germany invaded Poland. He returned to Belgium after the end of that war.

 

[1] NAA B2455, BROWN A

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Albert Brown, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[3] FAREWELLING. (1915, December 11). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 5. Retrieved March 26, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86106306

[4] OBITUARY (1941, June 26). The Biz (Fairfield, NSW : 1928 – 1972), p. 2. Retrieved March 26, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article76309000

 

Norman Hamond FRANCISCO

Norman Hamond FRANCISCO

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4775),  Norman Hamond Francisco was born at Cobar, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 24 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as baker.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 1 ½ inches tall, weight 162 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and light brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

A send-off was held on Thursday 28th October 1915 at the Court House Hotel in Cobar for Norman Francisco, brothers Walter and Robert Mitchell, and Andrew Lennox, and they were then cheered by many friends when they left Cobar by train on Saturday 30th October 1915 to join the A.I.F.[2]

All four of them completed their medical examinations, and were attested, at Dubbo on Monday 2nd November 1915, (the day the Coo-ees were at Lithgow).

Norman Francisco then traveled by train with these three other Cobar men to catch up with the Coo-ees.  They were waiting to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees arrived at Mt. Victoria three days later, on Thursday 4th November 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Francisco went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 20th December 1915 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp from 3rd to 19th December 1915. He was fined 17 days pay.

Private Francisco and fellow Coo-ee Private Lennox while home on leave were given a farewell at the Star Hotel in Cobar on Saturday, 1st January 1916.[4]

On 4th February 1916 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp on 1st February 1916. He was fined 1 days pay.

On 16th February 1916 he was charged with being absent from night piquet. He was fined 2 days pay.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Becker Street, Cobar, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his father, A. [Alfred] Francisco, at the same address.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Francisco, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On the 16th of April 1916 he transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel El Kebir, Egypt.

On the 4th of June 1916 Private Francisco left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived  at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 31st October 1916 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from 0830 on 29th October 1916 till 0900 on 29th October 1916. He was fined 4 days pay.

On 5th November 1916 Private Francisco was injured playing in a football match. He was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance. On 7th November 1916 he was admitted to the 1st New Zealand Stationary Hospital at Amiens, France, with a sprained ankle. On 9th November 1916 he was placed aboard the 9th Ambulance Train and sent to the 11th Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France, where he was admitted on 10th November 1916 with a fracture to the 5th metarasal bone in his right foot.

On 12th November 1916 Private Francisco was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Formosa bound for England. He was admitted to the 1st Southern General Hospital at Birmingham, England, on 13th November 1916, with a fractured toe.

Private Francisco was discharged from hospital on 19th February 1917, and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England on 6th March 1917.

On 24th March 1917 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from 3.30 pm on 6th March 1917 till 8.45 am on 23rd March 1917. He was awarded 10 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 28 days pay.

On 21st June 1917 Private Francisco was charged with neglecting to obey routine orders by being in Tidworth after hours on 19th June 1917 without a pass, using obscene language, and drunkenness. He was awarded 14 days detention.

On 21st August 1917 Private Francisco marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 23rd September 1917 he was appointed Acting Lance Corporal at Fovant, England, while attending school.

On 20th October 1917 Private Francisco was sent to the Sutton Veny Military Hospital sick with Influenza.  He revered to the rank of Private on being admitted to hospital.  He was discharged on 30th October 1917.

On 22nd February 1918 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 19th February 1918 till apprehended by the Military Police at 1815 on 20th February 1918. He was awarded 1 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 3 days pay.

On 7th April 1918 Private Francisco departed Southampton, England, bound for France.  He marched into the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Havre on 8th April 1918.

On 19th April 1918 he rejoined the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France.

On 22nd May 1918 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was resting  in billets around the village of Bussy, France, when it was bombed by enemy aircraft.[6]  One man was killed and 6 were wounded. Private Francisco was one of those wounded, receiving a bomb wound to his right leg. He was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance. On 23rd May 1918 he was moved back to the 5th Casualty Clearing Station. On 27th May 1918 he was placed aboard the 10th Ambulance Train, being admitted to the 47th General Hospital later that day. He was discharged on 5th June 1918, and sent to the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

He rejoined the 4th Pioneer Battalion on the 19th of June 1918.

On 13th March 1919 Private Francisco departed France bound for England to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at Weymouth, England, on 14th March 1919 and marched into the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 1st May 1919 Private Francisco commenced his return to Australia aboard the Transport China.

He arrived in Australia on 11th June 1919.

Private Francisco was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 26th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, FRANCISCO N H

[2] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 30 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136723099

[3] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 6 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136724708

[4] Valedictory. (1916, January 4). Western Age (Dubbo, NSW : 1914 – 1932), p. 2. Retrieved February 18, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136725949

[5] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Norman Hammond [sic] Francisco, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 14/16 – 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, May 1918.

Frederick Graham HARVEY

Frederick Graham HARVEY (MM)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4792), Frederick Graham Harvey was born at Wagga Wagga, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 19 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farmer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 10 stone, with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and fair hair.  His religious denomination was Presbyterian.   He claimed that he had no previous military service.

The National Advocate reported on 22nd October 1915 that  ‘Fred Graham Harvey’ of the ‘Cosmopolitan Hotel, Bathurst’, was one of the 16 ‘Bathurst Burrs’  recruited by the Bathurst Recruiting Association  who had ‘been enlisted and passed by the medical officer ‘ to join the Coo-ees when they reached Bathurst.[2]

The National Advocate reported that ‘a dozen men actually left Bathurst with the Coo-ees, and that ’the remainder of the Bathurst unit will follow on and catch up with the Coo-ees probably at Wallerawang and Lithgow’.[3]

His ‘Date of Joining’ per his embarkation roll was 22nd October 1915.[4]  Per a Statutory Declaration in his service record, Frederick Graham Harvey stated he was attested at Bathurst. A letter from his mother dated 23rd October 1915 from West Maitland, giving permission for him to enlist, is in his file.

However, there appears to be an anomaly with his enlistment papers, as his initial enlistment paperwork from Bathurst appears to be missing from his file.  The ‘Oath to the Taken by Person Being Enlisted’ section of his Attestation Paper has the initial details of ‘taken and subscribed at Bathurst’  on ‘28th October 1915’ crossed out (the day the Coo-ees arrived in Bathurst), and changed to 13th November 1915 at Liverpool.  He was attested at Liverpool my Lieutenant E. Shaw on 13th November 1915 (the day after the Coo-ee March finished in Sydney), and he completed a medical examination at Liverpool on the same day.

So it appears he presented to enlist with the Coo-ees in Bathurst, but it is unclear if he marched out of Bathurst with the Coo-ees, or caught up with them along the way.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp with the Coo-ees as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

An entry in his service record dated 22nd November 1915 at Liverpool stated that he had been absent from guard duty [date not recorded], and he was warned.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 58 Keppel Street, Bathurst, N.S.W. His next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs S. Harvey, 23 Wolfe Street, West Maitland, N.S.W.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Harvey, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion, and arrived in Egypt on  11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Harvey was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On 4th June 1916 Private Harvey left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian, bound for France. He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Harvey was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 2nd December 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was constructing tramways near Longueval, France when Private Harvey suffered a sprained back.[6] He was sent to the 15th Australian Field Ambulance. On 3rd December 1916 he was sent to a Rest Station. On 13th December 1916 he re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion, when it was still constructing tramways near Longueval, France.

He went to hospital sick on 14th March 1917.  He re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion from hospital the next day.

On 14th October 1917 Private Harvey was awarded the Military Medal for action he performed on 26th September 1917 when the 4th Pioneer Battalion was engaged on the Ypres Sector in the vicinity of Westhoek, Belgium.

The citation reads:

For gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the YPRES Sector. This man assisted his Officer in carrying out a very daring daylight reconnaissance immediately following the attack on 26th September. Under very heavy hostile shell fire a location for an important Communication Trench and taped and laid out. After this was completed he returned to a rendezvous to guide the Company up to dig the Trench. He went forward reconnoitering for the safest routes possible and by his initiative, enabled the digging party to reach, and successfully completed the job. By his coolness and courage he set a fine example to all.[7]

Notification of Private Harvey’s  award was gazetted in Third Supplement No. 30431 to The London Gazette, 14th December 1917 (page 13198), and was also published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, 2nd May 1918 (page 1036).[8]

On 24th December 1917 Private Harvey was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance suffering Pyrexia.

He was discharged and returned to the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 2nd January 1918, when it was digging trenches near Guyencourt, France.[9]

On 21st March 1918 Private Harvey was promoted to Lance Corporal.

On 6th May 1918 Lance Corporal Harvey was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Bronchitis. He was moved to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station later that day.  On 7th May 1918 he was placed aboard the 27th Ambulance Train. On 8th May 1918 he was admitted to the 6th General Hospital at Rouen, France.

On 12th May 1918 Lance Corporal Harvey was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Grantully Castle for evacuation to England. On 13th May 1918 he was admitted to the Winchester General Military Hospital.

On 8th June 1918 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On1st July 1918 he was discharged and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

On 5th September 1918 Lance Corporal Harvey marched into the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge Deverill, England.

On 20th September 1918 Lance Corporal Harvey was transferred to the 1st Training Brigade.

On 13th January 1919 Lance Corporal Harvey marched into a concentration camp at Codford, England, awaiting his return to Australia.

On 21st March 1919 Lance Corporal Harvey left England on the H.M.T. Kildonian Castle, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 9th May 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 23rd June 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, HARVEY F G

[2] Bathurst Route Marchers. (1915, October 22). National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158147800

[3] To the Sea (1915, October 30). National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved January 27, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158152730

[4] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Frederick Graham Harvey,  4792. HMAT Star of England A15, 8 March 1916.

[5] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Frederick Graham Harvey,  4792. HMAT Star of England A15, 8 March 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 14/16 – 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, December 1916.

[7] Australian War Memorial. Honours and Awards (Recommendation), Francis [sic] Graham Harvey, Private, 4792, 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/R1586601

[8] Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation (1918, May 2). Commonwealth of Australia Gazette (National : 1901 – 1973), p. 1036. Retrieved January 29, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232464380

[9] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 14/16 – 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, January 1918.

George EAVERS

George EAVERS

Per his initial military service record (regimental no. 4768), George Eavers was born at Manchester, Lancashire, England.[1] He gave his age as 27 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as barman.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 3 ½ inches tall, weight 9 stone, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.   He claimed to have no previous military service.

George Eavers was named in the National Advocate as one of seven recruits who had volunteered to join the Coo-ees at a recruiting rally held at the Soldiers’ Monument in Bathurst on the evening of 22nd October 1915.[2]

He was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Bathurst on 28th October 1915 (when the Coo-ees were at Bathurst).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

He completed his medical examination at Liverpool on 13th November 1915.

On 21st January 1916 Private Eavers was charged with being absent without leave from 6th to the 8th January 1916. He was fined 10 shillings.

On 7th February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave from 1st to the 7th February 1916. He was fined 30 shillings.

Listed under “George Eayers” on his embarkation roll, his address at time of enrolment was Cosmopolitan Hotel, Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as friend, B Howe, at the same address.[3]

On 8th March 1916 Private Eavers, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Eavers was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 2nd May 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave from 1600 on 29th April 1916 till 0600 on 2nd May 1916. He was awarded 4 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 4 days pay.

On 4th June 1916 Private Eavers left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Two and half months later, on 30th August 1916 Private Eavers reported sick with an abscess on his right groin. On 1st September 1916 he was sent to the 3rd Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France. On 3rd September 1916 he was sent to the 6th General Hospital at Rouen.

On 15th September 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Asturias at Le Harve, France, for evacuation to England. Later that day he was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth with an abcess on both groins.

On 6th November 1916 Private Eavers was discharged from hospital, and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England, on 21st November 1916.

On 30th November 1916 Private Eavers was admitted to the Parkhouse Military Hospital sick.  He was discharged on 16th February 1917.

On 24th February 1917 Private Eavers was admitted sick to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England. He was discharged on 19th May 1917.

On 29th May 1917 Private Eavers was charged with being absent without leave from 3.30 pm on 19th May 1917 till 9.15 pm on 24th May 1917. He was sentenced to 3 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 13 days pay.

On 1st June 1917 Private Eavers was charged with being absent without leave from 10 pm on 30th May 1917 till 10.30 pm on 31st May 1917. He was sentenced to 48 hours detention and fined 4 days pay.

On 27th June 1917 Private Eavers was transferred to the Pioneer Training Battalion at Fovant, England.

Private Eavers commenced his return to Australia on 7th July 1918 aboard the H.M.A.T. Essex.

He arrived in Australia on 1st September 1918.

He was discharged medically unfit on 19th October 1918.

 

[1] NAA B2455, EAVERS G

[2] Recruiting Rally (1915, October 23). National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved January 28, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158152992

[3] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, George Eayers [sic], 4768.

Jack Graham WIGGINS

Jack Graham WIGGINS

Pte. J. Wiggins (Sunday Times, 8/10/1916, p. 9)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4918), Jack Graham Wiggins was born at Springwood, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 9 stone 7 lbs., with a dark complexion, dark grey eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His “Joined on” date on his Attestation Paper was recorded as 9th November 1915, the day the Coo-ees marched from Springwood to Penrith.

He completed his medical examination at Springwood on 9th November 1915, but was not attested until 11th November 1915 at Ashfield (when the Coo-ees were at Ashfield).

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 4th January 1916 Private Wiggins was charged with being absent without leave for 7 days. He was fined.

On 21st February 1916 he was charged with being absent from Parade on 19th  February 1916. He was fined.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Sassafras Road, Springwood, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, E. Wiggins, at the same address.[2]

On 8th March 1916 Private Wiggins, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Wiggins left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Wiggins served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France, in July 1916, then as it moved to Pozieres in early August 1916.

From the 5th August 1916 until the 8th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was holding front line trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, France, until they were relieved, and moved back into support trenches.[3] On 8th August 1916 Private Wiggins was wounded in action, with a gunshot wound to his face.  He was evacuated to the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station on 9th August 1916. On 10th August 1916 he was admitted to the 2nd Australian General Hospital at Wimereux, France.

On 14th August 1916 Private Wiggins was sent by Hospital Ship from Le Havre to England, where he was admitted to the Northampton War Hospital.

On 6th October 1916 he reported back from leave to No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England.  He then marched in to the 12th Training Battalion camp at Codford.

On 14th October 1916 Private Wiggins departed England for France.

On 5th October 1916 Private Wiggins marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 29th October 1916 he re-joined the 45th Battalion when it was training at Brucamps, France.

On 5th December 1916 the 45th Battalion was training at Dernacourt, France.[4] On this day Private Wiggins was charged with being absent from parade (fatigue work). He was awarded 168 hours Field Punishment No. 2.

On 23rd December 1916 the 45th Battalion was training at Flesselles, France.[5]  Private Wiggins was charged with being absent without leave from Parade at Dernacourt on 11th December 1916. He was fined 7 days pay.

On 29th December 1916 Private Wiggins was sent to hospital.  On 1st January 1917 the 45th Battalion was still training at Flesselles, France, when Private Wiggins was evacuated to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance with Trench Feet. He re-joined the 45th Battalion on 15th January 1917 when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Guedecourt, France.

On 12th November 1917 the 45th Battalion was training at Erny St Julien, France.[6] On this day Private Wiggins was charged in a Field General Court Martial with while on active service, deserting his Majesty’s Service. Private Wiggins pleaded not guilty. He was found not guilty of desertion, but guilty of being absent without leave from 10 am on 19th October 1917 to 4 pm on 20th October 1917. The 45th Battalion had been in the front line around Ypres, Belgium, at the time.[7] He was awarded 90 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 49 days pay. 65 days of the Field Punishment was later remitted.

On 28th March 1918 the 45th Battalion was in support and front line trenches in the vicinity of Dernacourt, France, during the First Battle of Dernacourt, when Private Wiggins was wounded in action for the second time, receiving a shrapnel wound to his left thigh.[8]  He was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance. The next day he was moved back to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station, then admitted  to the 20th General Hospital at Camiers, France.

On 1st April 1918 Private Wiggins was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Ville De Liege for evacuation to England. Upon arrival he was admitted to the Norfolk War Hospital at Norwich, England.

On 9th May 1918 Private Wiggins was discharged from hospital, and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England, on 23rd May 1918.

On 16th June 1918 Private Wiggins was admitted to the Sutton Veny Military Hospital suffering Influenza. He was discharged on 24th June 1918.

On 6th July 1918 Private Wiggins was transferred to the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge Deverill, England. On 3rd August 1918 Private Wiggins departed Folkestone, England, bound for France. On 5th August 1918 he marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 11th August 1918 Private Wiggins re-joined the 45th Battalion when it was resting in the vicinity of Sailly-Laurette, France.[9]

On 20th January 1919 the 45th Battalion was at Hastiere, Belgium, when Private Wiggins was charged with using insolent language Towards an NCO. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 14 days pay.

On 30th January 1919 Private Wiggins was one of a party of 50 men from the 45th Battalion sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France, to commence the journey to Australia for demobilisation.

On 10th February 1918 Private Wiggins departed Le Harve for England, arriving at Weymouth on 11th February 1919, where he marched into the 3rd Training Brigade.

On 31st March 1919 Private Wiggins was declared an Illegal Absentee, having been absent without leave from 3rd March 1919.

On3rd July 1919 a court martial was held where Private Wiggins was charged with being absent without leave from 0001 3rd March 1919 till reporting back at 1700 on 11th June 1919. He was found guilty and sentenced to 4 months detention. On 28th July 1919 Private Wiggins was admitted to the Lewes Detention Barracks, England.

On 21st August 1919 Private Wiggins was discharged from the Lewes Detention Barracks, with the remainder of his sentence remitted.

On 22nd August 1919 Private Wiggins departed England bound for Australia aboard the HMAT  Anchises.

He arrived in Sydney on 13th October 1919, and was discharged the same day Services No Longer Required.

A welcome home concert was held for ‘J. Wiggins’ and several other local soldiers at Springwood on  27th December 1919.[10]

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WIGGINS JACK GRAHAM

[2] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Jack Graham Wiggins, 4918.

[3] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, August 1916.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, December 1916.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, December 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, November 1917.

[7] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, October 1917.

[8] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, March 1918.

[9] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, August 1918.

[10] SPRINGWOOD. (1919, December 26). The Blue Mountain Echo (NSW : 1909 – 1928), p. 7. Retrieved January 26, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108249963

 

John Thomas PARKER

John Thomas PARKER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4867), John Thomas Parker was born at Warren,  N.S.W. [1] He gave his age as 28 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as grocer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 10 ½ inches tall, weight 144 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military experience.

He completed his medical examination on 21st October 1915 at Dubbo, and was attested at Dubbo on 21st October 1915 (along with William Henry Nicholls, who was also from Coonamble).

The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate reported that ‘Mr. Jack Parker, a Coonambleite, caught up to and joined the “Coo-ees” at Molong’.[2] He and William Henry Nicholls were the ‘two men from Coonamble’ reported in The Gilgandra Weekly to have caught up with the Coo-ees when they were at Molong on 22nd October 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 22nd November 1915 at the Liverpool Camp he was charged with being absent without leave. He was fined 1 days pay.

On 7th February 1916 he was charged with being absent from special piquet. He was fined 5 shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Namoi Street, Coonamble, N.S.W. His next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs M. [Marion] Parker, at the same address.[4]

On 8th March 1916 Private Parker, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

On 16th April 1916 Private Simpson was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 4th June 1916 Private Parker left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 18th August 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was resting and training after just coming out of conducting works around Pozieres, France, when Private Parker was charged with being absent from 1400 Parade.[5] He was awarded 8 hours Field Punishment no. 1 and fined 1 days pay.

On 19th October 1916 Private Parker was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance sick with conjunctivitis. He was admitted to the 24th General Hospital at Etaples on 24th of October 1916.

On 28th October 1916 he was discharged to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 8th of December 1916 Private Parker was charged with drunkenness and being in possession of spirits on the 6th of December 1916. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 1.

On 12th December 1916 Private Parker re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion whilst it was conducting works and tramway maintenance in the vicinity of Longueval, France.[6]

On 15th June 1917 Private Parker was charged with being absent without leave from 2100 on 6th June 1917 till surrendering himself to the Military Police at 2115 on 8th June 1917. He was awarded 28 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 37 days pay.

On 25th July 1917 a Field General Courts Martial was held where Private Parker was charged with whilst being on active service absenting himself without leave from  2100 on 12th July till apprehended by R.S.M. Middleton at 2030 on 13th July 1917. He was found guilty, and sentenced to 6 month imprisonment with hard labour. On 2nd August 1916 the sentence was commuted to 90 days Field Punishment No. 1 and fined 103 days pay.

On 17th August 1917 Private Parker was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance sick. He was transferred to the 39th General Hospital  at Le Harve, France.  He was discharged from hospital on 1st September 1917, and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 29th October 1917 Private Parker was charged with being in Le Harve town without a pass and being out of bounds on 27th October 1917. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 14 days pay.

Private Parker re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 26th November 1917.

On 28th February 1918 Private Parker was sent to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance with Pyrexia. He was transferred to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station. On 3rd March 1918 he was moved to the 2nd Casualty Clearing Station. On 6th March 1918 he was placed aboard the 19th Ambulance Train and admitted to the 55th General Hospital at Boulogne suffering trench fever.

On 13th March 1918 Private Parker was placed aboard the H.S. Cambria and transferred to England, where he was admitted to the Tankerton Military Hospital at Whitstable, England, later that day.

On 5th April 1918 Private Parker was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

On 3rd May 1918 he was discharged from hospital, and sent to the No.3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 23rd June 1918 Private Parker was admitted to the Brigade Hospital at Hurdcott suffering from Influenza. He was discharged on 1st July 1918.

On 6th July 1918 Private Parker was transferred to the No.1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

On 14th October 1918 Private Parker marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 6th November 1918 he departed Southampton bound for France. He arrived on 7th November 1918, and re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France on 11th November 1918.

On 10th February 1919 Private Parker departed Le Harve, France, bound for England. He arrived at Weymouth on 11th February 1919.

On 13th April 1919 Private Parker departed England aboard the Transport Commonwealth bound for Australia.  During this voyage he was admitted to the ship’s hospital with scabies in 25th April 1919. He was discharged on 7th May 1919.

Private Parker arrived in Australia on 12th June 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 20th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, PARKER JOHN THOMAS

[2] ‘Our soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 2 November 1915, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601759

[3] ‘With the “Coo-ees.” From town to town’, Gilgandra Weekly , 20 October 1915, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119923919

[4] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, John Thomas Parker, 4867.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 14/16 – 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, August 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 14/16 – 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, December 1916.

George Allen LLOYD

George Allen LLOYD

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4828), George Allen Lloyd was born at Forbes, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 9 stone 13 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed medical on 15th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested at Orange on 18th  October 1915.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

‘G. A. Lloyd ’was named in newspaper reports as one of the men who was recruited by the local Recruiting Association to join the Coo-ees when they arrived in Orange on 24th October 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 2nd February 1916 Private Llloyd was charged with using bad language on parade. He was fined 5 shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was North Hill, Forbes, N.S.W. [3] His next of kin is listed as his father, G. A. Lloyd, North Hill, Forbes, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Lloyd departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Lloyd was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company (along with fellow Coo-ees Private Richardson, Private Megarrity, and Private Spicer).

On 17th June 1916 Private Lloyd left Alexandria aboard the Transport Manitou bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 25th June 1916.

On 3rd December 1916 Private Llloyd was sent to the 1st New Zealand Field Ambulance sick with Influenza. He was transferred to the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station later that day. On 5th December 1916 he was placed aboard a hospital train and moved back to the 32nd Stationary Hospital at Wimereux, France, being admitted on 6th December 1916.

On 24th December 1916 he was transferred to the 1st Convalescent Depot at Boulogne. He was discharged on 2nd of January 1917 and sent to the Australian General Base Depot at Etaples, France.

He re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 17th January 1917.

On 23rd January 1917 Private Lloyd was sent to the 3rd New Zealand Field Ambulance sick with Influenza. On 26th January 1917 he was moved back to the 2nd New Zealand Division Rest Station. He was discharged and re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 18th February 1917.

On 18th May 1917 Private Lloyd was detached for duty with the 2nd ANZAC Anti-aircraft section. He re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion from detachment on 25th May 1917.

On 20th July Private Lloyd went on leave, returning to his unit on 1st August 1917.

On 3rd August 1917 Private Lloyd was sent sick to the New Zealand Stationary Hospital at Hazebrouck, France. On 9th August 1917 he was admitted to the 7th Canadian Stationary Hospital at St Omer, France, suffering from nervous indigestion. On 12th August 1917 he was transferred to the 7th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France. On 16th August 1917 he was transferred to the 10th Convalescent Depot.

He was discharged on 2nd October 1917 and sent to the Australian General Base Depot at Le Havre. He re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 11th October 1917.

On 6th November 1917 Private Lloyd was sent to the Indian Cavalry Field Ambulance with a sprained left knee and a wound to the fifth finger on his right hand, caused by a fall from a cycle. He was moved back to the 59th Casualty Clearing Station later that day.

On 23rd November 1917 he was admitted to the 26th General Hospital. On 27th November 1917 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Stad Antwerpen for evacuation to England with synovitis of the left knee, and a wound to the right hand. He was admitted to the 16th Canadian General Hospital (Ontario Military Hospital), in England.

On 7th January 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England. He was discharged on 18th January 1918 and sent to the No.3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 15th February 1918 Private Lloyd was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 7th February 1918 until 1740 on 13th February 1918. The charge was dismissed as Private Lloyd produced a Medical Certificate.

On 24th February 1918 Private Lloyd was admitted to the Brigade Hospital suffering Influenza. He was discharged on 23rd March 1918.

On 21st May 1918 Private Lloyd marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 5th June 1918 he departed Southampton bound for France. He marched into the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve on 6th June 1918.

He was taken on strength from 2nd Anzac Corps Cyclist Battalion ex hospital and ex Base Depot to the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion on 10th June 1918.

On 10th November 1918 Private Lloyd went on leave to England. He re-joined the Cyclist Battalion on 8th December 1918.

On 26th March 1919 at Charleroi, Belgium, Private Lloyd was charged with gambling and being in possession of loaded firearms. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No.2 and fined 7 days pay.

On 13th April 1919 Private Lloyd marched into the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve, France, to commence his return to Australia.

He departed France on 18th April 1919. He arrived at Southampton, England, on 19th April 1919, and marched into the No. 2 Group.

On 29th May 1919 at Sutton Veny, England, Private Lloyd was charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 16th May 1919 until 1600 on 23rd May 1919. He was fined 21 days pay.

On 5th June 1919 Private Lloyd departed Devonport, England, aboard the H.T. Mahia bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 20th July 1919.  He was discharged medically unfit on 13th September 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, LLOYD GEORGE ALLEN

[2] THE RECRUITS. (1915, October 25). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 4. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599 ; “THE COO-EES.” (1915, October 23). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), p. 6. Retrieved January 1, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115269403

[3] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, George Allen Lloyd, 4828.