Tag Archives: HMAT A15 Star of England

Walter James MITCHELL

Walter James MITCHELL

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4842),  Walter James Mitchell was born at Cobar, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 37 years and 5 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as Contractor.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 147 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and light brown hair.  His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

A send-off was held on Thursday 28th October 1915 at the Court House Hotel in Cobar for Walter and his brother Robert Mitchell, Norman Franciso, and Andrew Lennox, and they were then cheered by many friends when they left Cobar by train on 30th October 1915 to join the A.I.F.[2]

Walter Mitchell completed his medical examination, and was attested, at Dubbo on 2nd November 1915, (the day the Coo-ees were at Lithgow).

Walter and his brother Robert Mitchell, Andrew Lennox, and Norman Francisco then travelled to catch up with the Coo-ees, and  were waiting to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees arrived at Mt. Victoria two days later, on 4th November 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Cobar, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his wife, Mrs H. G. [Henrietta] Mitchell, C/o W. Mitchell, Cobar, N.S.W.  His rank was listed as Acting Corporal.[4]

A farewell was held at the Masonic Hall in Cobar at the Masonic Hall on Friday 3rd March 1916 to bid farewell to Corporal Walter Mitchell, and his brother Private Bob Mitchell, and Private Fred Duncan. The Western Age reported that  ‘Corporal Walter Mitchell, on rising to respond on behalf of himself and his comrades, was loudly cheered’, and in a ‘very affected speech he said words failed to thank to people of Cobar for all the kind remarks and their nice presents’, and that they would ‘cherish them wherever it was their lot to be sent’, and that it was a ‘great wrench for him to go, but he realised duty had to be done, and he was going to do his little bit’.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Acting Corporal Mitchell, along with his brother, and many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Tel-el-Kebir, and taken on strength of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade, with the rank of Gunner.

On 22nd May 1916 Gunner Mitchell was transferred to the 37th Battery.

On 5th June 1916 Gunner Mitchell left Alexandria aboard the HMT Oriana bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 13th June 1916.

On 24th October 1916 Gunner Mitchell was taken on the strength of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.

On 25th October 1916 Gunner Mitchell was appointed as a Temporary Bombardier.

On 9th March 1917 Temporary Bombardier Mitchell was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance sick. On 12th March 1917 he was moved back to a Casualty Clearing Station, and reverted to the rank of Gunner.

On 19th April 1917 he was placed aboard the 20th Ambulance Train, and evacuated to the 14th Stationary Hospital at Boulogne, France.

On 22nd April 1917 Gunner Mitchell was placed aboard Hospital Ship Jan Breydel for evacuation to England, with meningitis.

On 23rd April he was admitted to the Addington Park War Hospital outside London, England.

On 18th May 1917 Gunner Mitchell was transferred to the Royal Herbert Hospital at Woolwich, England.

On 8th August 1917 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield Park, England.

Gunner Mitchell was discharged on the 18th of August 1917, and sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 27th September 1917 Gunner Mitchell departed England aboard the H.T.  Suevic bound for Australia, for medical discharge with Myalgia debility after C. S. Fever.

He arrived in Australia on 20th November 1917.

Private Mitchell was welcomed home and presented with a silver cup by the people of Cobar, and the Red Cross Association, at the Masonic Hall in Cobar on 5th December 1917.[6]

Private Mitchell was discharged medically unfit on 31st January 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, MITCHELL WALTER JAMES

[2] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 30 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136723099

[3] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 6 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136724708

[4] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Walter James Mitchell, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[5] ‘Cobar’s Farewell’, Western Age (Dubbo, NSW : 1914 – 1932), 10 March 1916, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136721446

[6] ‘Cobar Soldiers’ Red Cross Association’,Western Age, 7 December 1917, p. 3. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136909226

 

Charles CREASE

Charles CREASE

Private Charles Crease (Sunday Times 8/10/1916)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4754), Charles Crease was born at Camperdown, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 38 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 146 lbs., with a ruddy complexion, brown eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed to have no previous military service.

He was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway when the Coo-ees were at Lawson on 7th November 1915.  He completed his medical examination at Lawson on 8th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Kiyare, Simmonds Street, Enmore, N.S.W.[2]  His next of kin was listed as his sister, Mrs J. Lathan, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Crease, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 Private Crease was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Crease left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He disembarked at Marseilles on 9th June 1916.

Private Crease served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then as it moved to Pozieres in early August 1916.

On 12th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was in reserve trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, when Private Crease was wounded in action, receiving a shrapnel wound to his left hand.[3]  He was evacuated to the 44th Casualty Clearing Station.  On 13th August 1916 he was sent to the 24th General Hospital at Etaples, France.

On 6th September 1916 Private Crease was discharged from hospital, and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot.

On 17th October 1916 Private Crease rejoined the 13th Battalion when it was conducting training and supplying fatigue parties at Murrumbidgee Camp at La Clyette, Belgium.[4]

On 9th May 1917 the 13th Battalion was conducting training at Bresle, France, when Private Crease was admitted to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station suffering Neuritis.  He rejoined the Battalion on 15th May 1917.

On 29th September 1917 the 13th Battalion was near Zonnebeke, Belgium, when Private Crease was wounded in action, receiving shrapnel wounds to his arm, legs and chest.[5] He was evacuated to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance, then on to the 10th Casualty Clearing Station.

On 5th October 1917 Private Crease was moved back to the 1st Canadian General Hospital at Etaples, France.

On 16th October 1917 Private Crease was evacuated to England on the Hospital Ship Newhaven, where he was admitted to the 1st Western General Hospital at Liverpool, England.

Private Crease was discharged from hospital on 12th December 1917, and granted leave till 26th December 1917, when he reported to the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 27th December 1917 Private Crease was admitted to the camp hospital sick [VD Venereal Disease]. He was discharged on 3rd January 1918.

On 14th February 1918 Private Crease was transferred to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

Private Crease left England on 12th March 1918 for return to Australia aboard the S.S. Kenilworth Castle. The ship arrived at Cape Town, South Africa on 28th March 1918. On 28th April 1918 Private Crease departed Cape Town aboard the H.T. Field Marshall.

He arrived in Australian on 22nd May 1918 (gunshot wound right groin and abdomen).

He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 23rd June 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, CREASE C

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Charles Crease, HMAT Star of England A15, 8 March 1916.

[3] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/6 – August 1916.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/8 – October 1916.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/19 – September 1917.

Ernest TATTERSALL

Ernest TATTERSALL

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4904), Ernest Tattersall was born at Parkes, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 31 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 154 lbs., with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

A letter from his sister in his service record states that ‘He enlisted at Wellington with the Coo-ees’. [2] He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915. He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Mumbil on 19th October 1915.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 3rd February 1916 Private Tattersall was charged with being absent without leave from Liverpool Camp. He was fined 10 shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Piesley Street, Orange, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his sister Mrs. F. Phillips, at the same address.[3]

On 8th March 1916 Private Tattersall departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On the 16th of April 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On 4th June 1916 Private Tattersall left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Tattersall served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France until 14th October 1916, when he was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from an ulcer to the left leg. He was moved back to the 10th Casualty Clearing Station. On 15th October 1916 he was placed aboard the 23rd Ambulance Train for evacuation to the 25th General Hospital at Hardelot, France, where he was admitted on 16th October 1916.

On 20th October 1916 Private Tattersall was placed aboard the Hospital Ship St David at Boulogne for evacuation to England. On 21st October 1916 he was admitted to the Tonbridge General Hospital.

He was discharged from hospital on 23rd November 1916 for leave until 8th December 1916.  He marched in to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England, on 9th December 1916.

On 12th January 1917 Private Tattersall went before a Medical Board where he was classified as C2 [unfit for overseas temporarily unfit for home service].

On 10th April 1917 Private Tattersall was transferred to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.  A document in his service record dated 10th April 1917 at Weymouth noted ‘Old injury L. leg. Leg swells after marching’.

On 17th April 1917 Private Tattersall was detached for duty with the Ordinance Depot at Bhurtpore Barracks, Tidworth.

On 22nd July 1917 Private Tattersall left England on the H.T. Nestor bound for Australia.

He arrived at Sydney on 25th September 1917, and was discharged Medically Unfit on 24th October 1917, with a compound fracture to the left leg [pre-existing injury from 10 years before].

Note: Ernest Tattersall died from Pneumonic Influenza in Sydney on 14th March 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, TATTERSALL ERNEST

[2] NAA: B2455, TATTERSALL ERNEST, letter from Mrs F. Phillips to Officer in Charge, Base Records Office, Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria, 24th August 1916.

[3] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Ernest Tattersall, HMAT Star of England A15, 8 March 1916.

 

Herbert William SPICER

Herbert William SPICER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4897), ‘William Herbert Spicer’ was born at Wimmin, Victoria.[1]  (He signed his name Herbert William Spicer on his Attestation Paper, and other official records record his name as Herbert William Spicer, so it appears  his first and middle name may have not have been recorded in the correct order  on his service record). [2] He gave his age as 21 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farm labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 9 stone 6 lbs., with a fair complexion, gray eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his Certificate of Medical Examination at Gilgandra on 12th October 1915, two days after the commencement of the Coo-ee March.  It is not clear exactly where he caught up with the Coo-ees, but he had joined them by the time they arrived at Wellington, as his Certificate of Medical Examination was co-signed at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at that town).  He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 20th October 1915.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On the 31st of January 1916 Private Spicer was charged with being absent from parade. He was fined 5 shillings.

The Dimboola Banner and Wimmera and Mallee Advertiser reported on 31st March 1916 that ‘Private Herbert Spencer, youngest son of Mr F. W. Spicer, of Lochiel, who enlisted at Gilgandra, N.S.W., was one of the famous “Coo-ees,” who marched 320 miles to Sydney’.[3]  This information was provided to this newspaper by his brother-in-law, Mr. A. A. Fechner, formerly of Dimboola, who had moved to Gilgandra with his wife Lily (Herbert’s sister) about 1911.[4]

‘H. Spicer’ was presented with a watch and a wallet at a send-off held for the Gilgandra Coo-ees at the Australian Hall in Gilgandra on Friday 3rd March 1916.[5]

His name was recorded as ‘Herbert Spicer’ on his embarkation roll, and his address at time of enrolment was ‘Gilgandra’.  His next of kin was listed as his father, F. [Frederick William] Spicer, Dimboola, Victoria.

On 8th March 1916 Private Spicer departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company (along with fellow Coo-ees Private Richardson and Private Megarrity).

On 17th June 1916 Private Spicer left Alexandria aboard the Transport Manitou bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 25th June 1916.

On 8th July 1916 Private Spicer was attached to the 2nd ANZAC Headquarters as escort to the G.O.C. [General Officer Commanding] in France.  He was detached to join the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 28th September 1916.

On 10th October 1916 Private Spicer commenced a training course at the Signals School. He returned to his unit on 27th December 1916.

On 3rd February 1917 Private Spicer was charged with conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline, in that he did upon being issued with his rum contrary to regulations, hand it to another soldier. He was awarded 3 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 26th March 1917 Private Spicer was detached for duty with the 2nd ANZAC Corps Anti-Aircraft Section.

He returned to his unit from this detachment on 19th of May 1917.

On 21st May 1917 he was detached for duty with the A.P.M. [Assistant Provost Marshal] 2nd ANZAC Corps.  He rejoined his unit on 5th June 1917.

On 23rd July 1917 he was sent to the Power Buzzer School. He returned to his unit on 1st August 1917.

On 4th August 1917 Private Spicer went on leave.  He returned from leave on 16th August 1917.

On 10th September 1917 the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion commenced work burying cable in the vicinity of La Clytte, Belgium, when the working parties came under attack by gas shelling.[6] Private Spicer was one of 43 men in his unit evacuated the next day with mustard gas poisoning. He was taken first to the 103rd Field Ambulance, then to the 9th Casualty Clearing Station, and the 11th Casualty Clearing Station.

On 12th September 1917 Private Spicer was placed aboard the 21st Ambulance Train for evacuation to the 53rd General Hospital at Boulogne, France.

On 23rd September 1917 he was transferred to the 1st Convalescent Depot at Boulogne. On 25th September 1917 he was transferred to the 10th Convalescent Depot.

On 18th November  1917 Private Spicer marched into the Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He rejoined his Battalion on 25th November 1917.

On 30th November 1917 Private Spicer was sent to the 43rd Field Ambulance, then back to the 10th Casualty Clearing Station sick. On 1st December 1917 he was placed aboard the 5th Ambulance Train.  He arrived at the 9th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France, on 2nd December 1917. On 4th December 1917 he was transferred to the 29th General Hospital at Boulogne.

He was discharged to Base Depot on 2nd February 1918. He rejoined his Battalion on 7th February 1918.

On 25th March 1918 Private Spicer was detached for duty with the 1st Australian Division Signals Company.

On 13th September 1918 Private Spicer went on leave to England.  He returned from leave on 29th September 1918.

On 24th January 1919 Private Spicer was officially transferred to the 1st Australian Division Signals Company.

On 4th June 1919 Private Spicer departed France to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at No. 1 Group at Longbridge, England, on 5th June 1919.

On 4th July 1919 Private Spicer departed England aboard the H.T. Norman bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 20th August 1919, and was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 12th October 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, SPICER HERBERT WILLIAM

[2] Herbert William Spicer, Victorian Birth Registration, 1896, Reg. no. 22234.

[3] ‘News and Notes’, Dimboola Banner and Wimmera and Mallee Advertiser,  31 March 1916, p. 2. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article152834929

[4] ‘Obituary’, Gilgandra Weekly and Castlereagh, 18 June 1936, p. 4. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113030512

[5] ‘Our Soldiers’ Column’, Gilgandra Weekly, 10 March 1916, p. 14. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119923509

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 12/2 – 2nd ANZAC Corps Cyclist Battalion, AWM4 12/2/15 – September 1917.

Ernest Henry KING

Ernest Henry KING

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4821), George Davidson was born at Bathurst, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 29 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as blacksmith.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed to have had 3 years military service in B Company of the 3rd Infantry Regiment at Bathurst.

Captain A. C. Eade stated that ‘Private King joined the Coo-ees at Wallerawang’ in a farewell given for him and another soldier at the Soldiers’ Monument in Bathurst on 6th January 1916.[2] The ‘Date of joining’ on the HMAT Star of England A15 embarkation roll for Private Ernest Henry King was recorded as 31st October 1915.[3]  On this date the Coo-ees had a rest day at Wallerawang, after having held a recruiting meeting there the night before.

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Captain Eade, at Lithgow, on 2nd November 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The Lithgow Mercury reported that ‘Ern King’, along with fellow Coo-ee George Davidson, who had both joined the Coo-ees from Cullen Bullen, ‘were farewelled at a smoke concert in the Cullen Hall’ in early January 1916, and Private King was presented with ‘a silver cigarette case, holder, and pouch’.[4]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 98 Russell Street, Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs. M. A. [Mary Ann] King, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private King, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private King on was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 19th April 1916 Private King was sent to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance at Serapaum, Egypt, suffering from Mumps. On 25th April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Casualty Clearing Station at Serapaum. He was discharged on 4th May 1916 and re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On 4th June 1916 Private King left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 9th August 1917 Private King went on leave in France until 19th August 1917.

On 8th September 1917 Private King was detached to the 14th Australian Army Service Company to paint wagons. He returned to the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 17th September 1917.

On 1st December 1917 Private King was promoted to Lance Corporal.

On 27th September 1918 Lance Corporal King was appointed Driver, and went on leave to England. He returned to the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 13th October 1918.

On the 7th of April 1919 Lance Corporal King departed Le Harve, France, bound for England. He arrived at Southampton, England on 9th April 1919.

On 12th May 1919 Lance Corporal King departed England on the HT Port Napier bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 5th July 1919.  He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 27th August 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, KING E H

[2] ‘Privates Jack Rigby and E. King’, National Advocate, 7 January 1916, p. 5. Retrieved June 18, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158051490

[3] Australia War Memorial. ‘First World War Embarkation Rolls, Ernest Henry King’, HMAT Star of England A15, https://oldsite.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1830975/

[4] ‘Cullen Bullen Recruiting’, Lithgow Mercury, 7 January 1916, p. 3. Retrieved June 18, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218730509

George DAVIDSON

George DAVIDSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4760), George Davidson was born at Morpeth, Northumberland, England.[1]  He gave his age as 44 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 5 inches tall, with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and grey brown hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had no previous military experience.

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Captain A. C. Eade, at Lithgow, on 2nd November 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The Lithgow Mercury reported that ‘Geordie Davidson’ along with fellow Coo-ee ‘Ern King’, who had both joined the Coo-ees from Cullen Bullen, ‘were farewelled at a smoke concert in the Cullen Hall’ in early January 1916, and Private Davidson was ‘presented with a pipe and tobacco pouch’.[2]

Private G. Davidson was also given a send off ‘by his many friends’ at ‘the house of Mr. F. Maddy’ in Bathurst [who was listed as his next of kin on his Attestation Paper] in early January 1916, where he was ‘presented with a wristlet watch and also a pocket bible from his friends’.[3]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Cullen Bullen, Mudgee Line, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his friend, F. [Fred] Muddy [i.e. Maddy], 265 Russell Street, Bathurst, N.S.W.

The ‘Date of joining’ on the HMAT Star of England A15 embarkation roll for both Private George Davidson and Private Ernest Henry King was recorded as 31st October 1915.[4]  The Coo-ees arrived at Wallerawang and held a recruiting meeting there on 30th October 1915.  According to Mr H. T. Blacket who accompanied the Coo-ees in his motor car, seven men presented themselves to join the Coo-ees that evening.[5]  The Coo-ees had a rest day at Wallerawang on 31st October 1915, before marching on to Lithgow on 1st November 1915.  Both George Davidson and Ernest Henry King completed their medical examinations, and were attested by Captain Eade, at Lithgow on 2nd November 1915.  Captain Eade stated that ‘Private King joined the Coo-ees at Wallerawang’ in an article published in the National Advocate on 7th January 1916.  So it appears possible that George Davidson may also have been present at the recruiting meeting held at Wallerawang on the evening of 30th October 1915.[6]

On 8th March 1916 Private Davidson, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Davidson was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 4th June 1916 Private Davidson left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 29th August 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was conducting maintenance on trenches in the vicinity of Mouquet Farm, France, when Private Davidson was struck by a the blast of a high explosive shell in the left arm.

On 31st August 1916 Private Davidson was admitted to the 3rd Canadian Field Ambulance with a fracture of left scapula [shoulder blade].

His movements for the next year while he recovered from his wounds are not clear on his service record.

On 27th August 1917 he was transferred to England from the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Havre, France.

He arrived at Weymouth, England, on 29th August 1917, where he marched into the No. 2 Command Depot, with classification “C1” [fit for home service only].

On 26th September 1917 Private Davidson departed England bound for Australia aboard the HMAT Borda for medical discharge, with a deformity to the left elbow.

Private Davidson arrived at Sydney on 25th November 1917.  He was discharged medically unfit on 27th December 1917.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, DAVIDSON G

[2] ‘Cullen Bullen Recruiting’, Lithgow Mercury, 7 January 1916, p. 3. Retrieved June 18, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218730509

[3] ‘Personal’, National Advocate, 7 January 1916, p. 5. Retrieved June 18, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158051548

[4] Australia War Memorial. ‘First World War Embarkation Rolls, George Davidson’, HMAT Star of England A15, https://oldsite.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1834299/

[5] ‘The Great Route March … Yetholme to Wallerawang’, The Farmer and Settler, 2 November 1915, p. 3. Retrieved June 19, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116674770

[6] ‘Privates Jack Rigby and E. King’, National Advocate, 7 January 1916, p. 5. Retrieved June 18, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158051490

 

George SEAMAN

George SEAMAN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4929), George Seaman was born at Bathurst, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 28 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as bootmaker.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 5 inches tall, weight 9 stone, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed to have He claimed that he had no previous military service. He stated that he had been rejected by the A.I.F. previously for being too short.

He was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Bathurst on 28th October 1915.  He joined the Coo-ees at Bathurst.[2]  He did not complete his medical examination until 13th November 1915 at Liverpool.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 14th January 1916 Private Seaman was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp for six days. He was fined 30 shillings.

On 7th February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp for one day. He was fined 5 shillings.

On his embarkation roll Private Seaman’s address at time of enrolment was Brilliant Road, South Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs. E. [Eliza] Ingram, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Seaman, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, as15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 Private Seaman was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Seaman left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

On 4th July 1916 the 45th Battalion was at Sailly-Sur-Lys preparing to move into the trenches for the first time, when Private Seaman was evacuated to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Enteritis. On 7th July 1916 he was sent to the 4th Division Rest Station.  He rejoined the 45th Battalion on 9th July 1916.

A month later, on 8th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was in the front line trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, France, when Private Seaman was evacuated with shell shock. On 10th August 1916 he was transferred from the 44th Casualty Clearing Station by ambulance train to the 14th Stationary Hospital at Boulogne, France.

The Bathurst Times reported that Private George Seaman ‘… took part in the battle of Pozieres and was buried by earth disturbed by a bomb … and he was taken to the casualty station and subsequently sent over the England …’[3]

On 12th September 1916 Private Seaman was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Newhaven for evacuation to England with debility after shell shock.  He was admitted to the War Hospital at Reading, England, on the same day.

On 16th October 1916 Private Seaman was discharged from hospital and granted leave in London until 31st October 1916 to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England.

On 2nd November 1916 he marched into No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, with classification B1A [fit for light duty].

On 23rd March 1917 Private Seaman was transferred to the 61st Battalion at Wareham, England.

On 23rd April 1917 Private Seaman was transferred to the No. 4 Command Depot at Wareham, England.

On 2nd May 1917 he was transferred to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

Private Seaman departed England on 22nd July 1917 for return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T.  A71 Nestor with inguinal hernia.

He arrived in Australia on 25th September 1917.  He was discharged medically unfit on 23rd October 1917.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, SEAMAN GEORGE

[2] ‘The Coo-ees’, The Bathurst Times,  10 October 1916, p. 4. Retrieved June 9, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109934579

[3] ‘Soldiers return’, The Bathurst Times, 28 September 1917, p. 1. Retrieved June 9, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111567652

 

William John SHANNON

William John SHANNON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4889), William John Shannon was born at Glasgow, Scotland.[1]  He gave his age as 24 years and 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 4 1/8 inches tall, weight 8 stone 12 lbs., with a dark complexion, hazel eyes, and black hair.  His religious denomination was recorded as Presbyterian.  He claimed that he had 3 years previous military service in the Royal Field Artillery in Scotland.

William Shannon was listed in The Leader as one of the men who were recruited at Orange to join the Coo-ees’.[2]  He completed his medical examination on 24th October at Orange, and was attested by Captain T. Nicholas at Orange on 24th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 27th January 1915 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp for 11 days.  He was fined 11 days pay.

Private Shannon was involved in hearing at the Central Police Court on 25th January 1916, followed by a court case on 6th March 1916 at the Darlinghurst Quarter Sessions, in which another Coo-ee was charged with, and subsequently found guilty of, having assaulted fellow Coo-ee Daniel Lynch at Central Railway Station about midnight on January 16th 1916, and robbed him of two pounds.[3]  A witness testified that ‘Shannon, who was the worse for drink, took no part in the robbery’, and he was subsequently discharged.[4]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was left blank, and his next of kin is listed as his father, S. [Samuel] Shannon, Lane Street, off Chloride Street, Broken Hill, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916, Private Shannon, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Cannon was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 10th May 1916 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from 1600 on 29th April 1916 until 0600 on 2nd May 1916.  He was awarded 96 hours Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 7 days pay.

On 4th June 1916 Private Shannon left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 25th August 1916 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from 1400 until 2030 on 24th August 1916 and Disobedience of Orders.  He was awarded 21 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 22 days pay.

On 30th May 1917 Private Shannon was charged with being absent without leave from 2045 Parade and from 2100 Tattoo Roll Call until 2200 on 27th May 1917.  He was fined 2 days pay.

Two days later on 1st June 1917 Private Shannon was promoted to Lance Corporal.

On 29th July 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon was detached to the 2nd Army rest Camp.  He re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion on13th August 1917.

On 24th August 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon went on leave.  He re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion from leave on 7th September 1917.

On 4th December 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon was detached to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France, to go before a Medical Board.

On 10th December 1917 he went before the Medical Board and was classified as Permanent Base due to debility.

On 19th December 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon was transferred to England for permanent base duties.

On 20th December 1917 Lance Corporal Shannon marched into No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 10th January 1918 he marched into the 1st Training Brigade/Pioneer Training Battalion at Sutton Veny, England.

On 27th May 1918 Lance Corporal Shannon was sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 7th June 1918 Lance Corporal Shannon departed England on H.M.A.T. Essex to return to Australia for medical discharge (Hallux Valgus) [Bunion].

He arrived in Australia on 1st August 1918, and was discharged medically unfit on 3rd September 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, SHANNON WILLIAM JOHN

[2] ‘The Recruits’, Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 4. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

[3] ‘Soldier Charged’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 January 1916, p. 6. Retrieved March 1, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28782852

[4] ‘Soldier Charged’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 January 1916, p. 6. Retrieved March 1, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28782852

Joseph Clark GILMOUR

Joseph Clark GILMOUR

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4779), Joseph Clark Gilmour was born at Glasgow, Scotland.[1]  He gave his age as 27 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as mercer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 5 inches tall, with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and fair hair.  His religious denomination was Presbyterian.  He claimed that he had 6 years previous military service with the Royal Army Medical Corps.

He was attested and completed his medical examination at Liverpool on 13th November 1915, the day after the end of the Coo-ee March.  However, his date of joining on his embarkation roll is 5th November 1915, the day he joined the Coo-ee March at Katoomba.  “J. C. Gilmour” was named in The Blue Mountain Echo as one of ‘the lads who answered the call, and marched out with the Coo-ees’ at Katoomba.[2]

He had been working for Messrs. Hermann and Co. Ltd, at Coonamble,  and was presented with a ‘set of safety razors and fountain pen’ before he left Coonamble, and caught the train at Dubbo on 4th November 1915 to join the Coo-ees at Katoomba.[3]

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion, with the rank of Acting Corporal.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was not listed.  His next of kin is listed as his father, D. [David] Gilmour, 107 Pollock Street, Glasgow, S.S. [South Side], Scotland.

On 8th March 1916 Acting Corporal Gilmour, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Corps at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 9th May 1916 he was appointed Lance Corporal.

On 13th June 1916 he was promoted to Corporal.

On 17th June 1916 Corporal Gilmour departed Alexandra, Egypt, bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles, France. on 25th June 1916.

On 22nd July 1916 Corporal Gilmour was promoted to Company Quarter Master Sergeant with the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion.

On 17th August 1916 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was detached for duty with the New Zealand Division Headquarters.

On 29th December 1916 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was granted leave to England.  Hejoined the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 10th January 1917, when it was at Douliou, France.

On 7th June 1917 the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion was working on a cavalry track in the vicinity of Messines, Belgium, when C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was wounded in action, receiving a gunshot wound to his right arm.  He was sent to the 77th Field Ambulance, then moved to the 1st New Zealand Field Ambulance. On 9th June 1917 he was moved back to the 11th Casualty Clearing Station.  Later that day he was admitted to the 4th Stationary Hospital at Arques, France.

On 15th June 1917 he was discharged and returned to his unit, arriving on 16th June 1917 when it was in the vicinity of Steenwerck, France.

On the 31st of August 1917 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was granted leave.

He returned to the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion from leave on 15th September 1917.

On 16th September 1917 he was sent to the 133rd Field Ambulance sick, then was moved back to the 41st Casualty Clearing Station.  On 17th September 1917 he was placed aboard the 26th Ambulance Train and moved to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Abbeville, France, being admitted on the 18th of September 1917.  He was transferred to the 39th General Hospital at Le Havre on 19th September 1917.  He was discharged from hospital on 1st October 1917 and sent to the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve, France.  He re-joined his unit on 18th November 1917.

A letter he wrote to a Miss C. DeGill in Penrith in December 1917 thanking her for a gift of socks was published in the Nepean Times:

Just a line to let you know I received a pair of socks with your name and address enclosed in one of the socks, and I take this opportunity of thanking you for your kindness in sending such a useful gift, and I can assure you that the socks received by our battalion were appreciated by our boys. We are glad to know that the majority of people at home think something of those who are over here fighting for them, and we are proud of those gifts which are distributed to us occasionally. We also had sweets, tins of cocoa, and milk, flannel shirts and other items, mostly all of which are very useful to us, especially at a time like this – when the winter is setting in and getting very cold. I might say we are in the line just at the present time and doing some good work. As you reside in Penrith I think it might be interesting for me to tell you that I am one of the Gilgandra Coo-ees – and well I remember the reception we got at Penrith. I suppose you were one of the crowd who helped to make that reception the success it turned out to be. However, I shall never forget the day we marched into Penrith, and I might also state, that as far as I can learn there are not many of the Coo-ees left, but I happen to be one of the lucky ones, although I have had my fair share of being wounded and have recovered.  I must conclude, hoping this finds you well, it leaves me in the best of health. Again thanking you for your kindness in sending such a useful gift”.[4]

On 16thJanuary 1918 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was transferred to the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion in France.

On 26th January 1918 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was granted leave to England.  He returned Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion on 11th February 1918.

On 9th March 1918 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour attended the Australian Corps Infantry School for a course of instruction.  He re-joined his Battalion on 28th March 1918.

On 27th April 1918 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was detached for duty with the Area Commandant at Amiens .  He returned from the detachment on 9th May 1918.

On 24th June 1918 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was transferred to the 35th Battalion in France.

On 1st August 1918 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was sent to the 10th Australian Field Ambulance sick with Influenza.  He was moved back to the 5th Casualty Clearing Station later that day.  On 3rd August 1918 he was admitted to the 3rd General Hospital at Le Treport, France.  He was discharged on 12th August 1918, and sent to the Australian Convalescent Depot on 13th August 1918. On 5th September 1918 he was sent to the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

He re-joined the 35th Battalion on 12th September 1918.

On 2nd November 1918 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was detached for duty with the 24th Company of the Australian Army Service Corps.  He returned from detachment to the 35th Battalion on 10th November 1918.

On 12th December 1918 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was transferred to the Administrative Headquarters in England.

On 2nd January 1919 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was transferred to the Australian Army Pay Corps.

On 25th February 1919 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was admitted to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England, with an ingrown toenail.  He was discharged on 11th April 1919.

On 30th June 1919 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour was granted Non Military Employment Leave.

He returned to the 35th Battalion on 22nd September 1919.

On 6th October 1919 C.Q.M.S. Gilmour departed Southampton, England, aboard the Transport Pakeha bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 24th November 1919, and was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 17th January 1920.

 

[1] AA: B2455, GILMOUR J C

[2] March o’er the Mountains’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 12 November 1915, p. 3. Retrieved March 7, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142

[3] ‘Our Soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 16 November 1915, p. 3. Retrieved May 14, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77602202 ; N.S.W. Government Railways & Tramways docket from Dubbo to Katoomba dated 4th November 1915 in the official correspondence of the march held in the Mitchell Library collection.

[4] ‘Soldiers’ Welcome Socks’, Nepean Times, 9 March 1918, p. 3. Retrieved May 14, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86191998

 

Percy Frederick COOPER

Percy Frederick COOPER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4750), Percy Frederick Cooper was born at Newport, Isle of Wight, England.[1]  He gave his age as 28 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as railway fettler.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8inches tall, weight 150 lbs., with a dark complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed to have 2 years and 7 months previous military service with the Howitzer Battery Royal Field Artillery.

He was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Lawson at Lawson on 7th November 1915.  The Coo-ees had held a recruiting meeting in front of the post office at Lawson the evening before.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. He completed his medical examination at Liverpool on 13th November 1915.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Parkview, West Street, Petersham, N.S.W.  His next of kin is listed as his father, H. [Henry] Cooper, 6 Bellemead Street, Newport, Isle of Wight, England.

On 8th March 1916 Private Cooper along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 Private Cooper was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Cooper left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, disembarking at Marseilles on 9th June 1916.

Private Cooper served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 17th April 1917 the 45th Battalion was training at Bresle in France, when Private Cooper was admitted to the 13th Field Ambulance suffering Rheumatism.  He was sent to the Divisional Rest Station.  On 24th April 1917 he was transferred to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station.  He was discharged to duty on 11th May 1917.  On 12th May 1917 Private Cooper returned to the 45th Battalion when it was still at Bresle, France.

Less than a month later, on 8th June 1917 the 45th Battalion was involved in the Battle of Messines in Belgium when Private Cooper was wounded in action receiving a gunshot wound to his neck and back and left knee.  He was evacuated to the 9th Field Ambulance.  On 9th June 1917 he was transferred to the 9th General Hospital at Rouen, France.  On 14th June 1917 Private Cooper was placed aboard Hospital Ship St. George for evacuation to England.  On 15th June 1917 he was admitted to the Tooting Military Hospital with gunshot wound to the right shoulder and left knee. On the 19th of July 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

On 23rd July 1917 Private Cooper was discharged from Hospital and granted leave to report to No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott on 6th August 1917.

On 21st August 1917 Private Cooper marched in to the Overseas Training Brigade at Perham Downs.

On 17th September 1917 Private Cooper departed Southampton, England for return to France.  On 18th September 1917 Private Cooper marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 30th September 1917 Private Cooper re-joined the 45th Battalion when it was at China Wall, near Ieper (Ypres) in Belgium, after just coming out of the front line.

Just over two months later, on 5th December 1917 the 45th Battalion was at St Quentin, France, preparing to move to Peronne, when Private Cooper was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance, then admitted to the 2nd Canadian General Hospital suffering Trench Fever.  On 9th December 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Convalescent Depot.

On 22nd January 1918 he was discharged and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve.

On 9th February 1918 Private Cooper returned to the 45th Battalion when it was at in the front line in the vicinity of Hollebeke, Belgium.

On 28th September 1918 Private Cooper was appointed a Lance Corporal when the Battalion was at Pissy, France.

On 1st October 1918 Lance Corporal Cooper was granted leave to England.  He re-joined the 45th Battalion on 17th October 1918 when it was at Pissy, France.  He remained with the 45th Battalion in France for the rest of the war.

On 18th January 1919 Lance Corporal Cooper was granted leave to England until 3rd February 1919.

He returned to the 45th Battalion on 14th February 1919 when it was training in the vicinity of Namur, Belgium.

On 23rd February 1919 Lance Corporal Cooper departed France bound for England to commence his return to Australia.  Lance Corporal Cooper marched into the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott on 14th March 1919.

Lance Corporal Cooper commenced his return to Australia from Devonport on 1st May 1919 aboard the H.T. China, arriving in Australia on 11th June 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 11th August 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, COOPER P F

[2] ‘Coo-ees at Lawson’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 12 November 1915, p. 6. Retrieved May 14, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042178