Thomas Joseph WARD

Thomas Joseph WARD

‘Private Thomas Joseph Ward’. (1919). Australia’s fighting sons of the empire : portraits and biographies of Australians in the Great War. Sydney : B. Jackson & Co, National Library of Australia, http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-35909257

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4914), Thomas Joseph Ward was born at Maclean, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as groom.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 10 stone, with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was recorded as Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no  previous military service.

He completed his medical examination on 11th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested by Lieutenant R. Howe at Parramatta on 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Duke Street, Grafton, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, M. [Michael] Ward, at the same address.[2]

On 8th March 1916, Private Ward, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Ward was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company at Tel-el-Kebir in Egypt (along with fellow Coo-ees Private Brown, Private Richardson, Private Megarrity, Private Lloyd and Private Spicer).

On the 16th of April1916 he was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company.

The Grafton Daily Examiner newspaper reported on 6th June 1916:

‘Private T. J. Ward writes to his mother in Duke-street, dated April 23, that he has arrived in Egypt, after a splendid trip. The young soldier is in perfect health, and expected to leave shortly for France with the Cyclists’ Corps’.[3]

On 6th June 1916 Private Ward departed Alexandra, Egypt, aboard a transport bound for France.  He arrived on Marseilles on 15th June 1916.

After arriving in France, an extract from other letter Private Ward wrote home was published in the Grafton Daily Examiner, on 28th August 1916:

 “I like this country very much, as it puts me in mind of New South Wales, but I think it is a better country. After the war, if I have the luck to get back home again, I will be making my way back here. I am looking forward to having a birthday party in a few days”.[4]

After arriving in France, he was attached to 2nd Anzac Headquarters as an escort. He re-joined the Cyclist Battalion on 28th September 1916.

On 22nd January 1917 Private Ward went on leave to England. He returned to the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 7th February 1917.

On 24th February 1917 Private Ward was charged with Insolence to an NCO. He was awarded 7 days field punishment no. 2.

On 26th March 1917 he was detached for duty with the Anti Aircraft Section 2nd Anzac Headquarters.

He rejoined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 9th June 1917.

On 11th June 1917 Private Ward was sent to a Lewis Gun School. He re-joined the Battalion on 10th September 1917.

On 3rd December 1917 he was detached again to Anti Aircraft Section 2nd Anzac Corps.  He re-joined his Battalion on 9th December 1917. He was then detached again to Anti Aircraft 2nd Anzac Corps on 16th December 1917, then re-joined his Battalion on 23rd December 1917.

On 16th January 1918 Private Ward was transferred to the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion from the 22nd Corps Cyclist Battalion (late 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion) in France.

On 11th April 1918 Private Ward was detached for duty with the Corps Commanders Guard. He rejoined the Battalion on 21st April 1918.

On 24th July 1918 Private Ward went on leave to England. He returned to the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 9th August 1918.

On 18th April 1919 Private Ward departed France to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at Southampton, England, and marched into No. 2 Group on 19th April 1919.

Private Ward appears to have been reluctant to leave England, as on 13th June 1916 he was charged at Sutton Veny with evading embarkation and being absent without leave from 0400 on 4th June 1919 till 1800 on 12th June 1919. He was awarded 21 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 30 days pay.

On 1st July 1919 Private Ward departed England aboard the H.T. Frankfurt bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 20th August 1919.

He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 13th October 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WARD THOMAS JOSEPH

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Thomas Joseph Ward, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[3] PERSONAL. (1916, June 6). Daily Examiner (Grafton, NSW : 1915 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved June 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article194814480

[4] PERSONAL. (1916, August 28). Daily Examiner (Grafton, NSW : 1915 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved June 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article194812650

Update on Gilgandra Coo-ee Ernest Simpson

Update on Gilgandra Coo-ee Ernest Simpson

Paraded for medical inspection … (left to right): Messrs. C. Simpson, C. Finn, C. Marchant, and J. R. Lee (Daily Telegraph, 11/10/1915)

Ernest Simpson was the man standing on the left in this photograph of four of the Gilgandra recruits, that was taken at Gilgandra before the commencement of the Coo-ee March, and published in the Daily Telegraph on 11th October 1915. [1]   He was named as “C. Simpson” underneath this photograph, which apparently was a typographical error, (with the initial for his first name having been printed as “C” instead of “E”).

The Farmer and Settler, naming him just as ‘Simpson’, published the following report about him on 19th October 1915: ‘In addition to the men sworn in at Gilgandra and at towns en route, the great march column numbers: … Simpson, temporarily unfit, but hoping to pass the doctor in Sydney’.[2] 

His story continues further down the same page:

One of the men marching to Sydney has failed to pass the doctor. He waited for three weeks in Gilgandra, paying his own hotel expenses, and then when  he stripped for the medical inspection he was “turned down” for hernia. He is physically the strongest man that has offered, and is otherwise “as sound as a bell”. He intends to march to Sydney, undergo an operation upon arrival, and submit himself again.[3]

His name was also subsequently recorded as “C. Simpson” in the Gilgandra Weekly.[4]

With only these few 1915 newspaper references to work with, his identity remained a mystery until in 2014, a chance review of a document held in A. H. Miller’s papers relating to the Coo-ee March held in the Mitchell Library, which listed an “E. Simpson” with other Coo-ees still waiting for payment for their period of service who had been rejected as medically unfit on arrival at Liverpool Camp,  enabled his WWI Service Record to be located – under the name Ernest Simpson  – on the National Archives of Australia website. [5]

The earlier story I wrote about him can be found at https://cooeemarch1915.com/2014/05/25/ernest-simpson-aka-c-a-simpson/

I have wondered what happened to Ernest Simpson after the Coo-ee March, following his being discharged from the A.I.F. at  Liverpool Camp as medically unfit due to double inguinal hernia on 29th November 1915 – was he able to undergo an operation for his hernia, and did he re-attempt to go overseas to do his part for the war effort?

A few weeks ago I was in contact again with Gary Simpson, who has done some further family history research on his relative Ernest Simpson in the last few years.  He had been able to establish that Ernest Simpson had been working as a munitions worker in London from his English marriage certificate, but had not been able to find anything further on when he had gone to London, or when he returned to Australia.

With this new information from Gary Simpson, I was able to find the entry for his First World War Australian Munitions Worker record on the National Archives of Australia website, and place an order for it so it could be digitised, which has provided information about what Ernest Simpson did after the Coo-ee March, and the time he spent in England during the First World War.[6]

After being discharge medically unfit from the A.I.F. at Liverpool Camp on 29th November 1915, Ernest Simpson stayed for a while at the People’s Palace Hotel in Pitt, Street, Sydney. [7]  It is not known if he made enquiries about having an operation to fix his hernia at that time.

He then took up employment as a labourer with Lever Bros. at Port Kembla, about May 1916.[8]

To fill a skilled labour shortage in England under a joint Australian – British Government Australian Munition Workers scheme,  government  advertisements  appeared in newspapers around Australia from  August 1916 calling for skilled workers to volunteer for munitions work in England, with the offer of free passage, special allowances, guaranteed employment, and eventual repatriation to Australia.  The scheme was expanded to include navvies and labourers in early 1917 for general labouring work.[9]

In July 1917 advertisements were placed in newspapers in which the New South Wales Munitions Committee called for applications from skilled tradesmen, navvies and labourers, to work as munition workers under the scheme, with ‘the need for munitions and aeroplanes to make up the wastage caused by the war calls for as many men as can be obtained to proceed to England to assist in this work’.[10]

Ernest Simpson was one of the men who answered this call during July 1917 to do their bit for the war effort in England.

On his Commonwealth of Australia Department of Defence Application for Enrolment as Volunteer for Work as Navvy or Labourer in Great Britain form,  dated 24th July 1917, he gave his address as Port Kembla, C/o Murrays Boarding House, Port Kembla.[11]  His age was recorded as 35 years, his height as 5 feet 9 inches, and his weight as 12 stone 3 pounds.  He stated that he had been employed for 14 months by Lever Bros. at Port Kembla.

War Worker Simpson was issued War Worker Badge No. 1156, and just over a week after enlisting as a volunteer labourer, embarked from Sydney on H.M.A.T. Medic on 1st August 1917.

He arrived in England at Liverpool on 12th October 1917.

He began work on 15th October 1917, three days after arriving in England, with Messrs. D. Kerr & Co., Kingston-on-Thames, as a labourer.  It is also noted in his file that he had been placed at Messrs. Wills & Sons, Malden at some time, but this period of employment was not dated.

However, three months later, his hernia was to make him unable to carry out his duties.

Medical reports in his file show that he was admitted to St. Thomas’s Hospital on 25th January 1918, suffering from strangulated hernia, where he received an operation, and was unfit for work until 18th March 1918.

A printed Australian War Workers card in his file recorded his private address as 141 Waldegrave Road, Teddington, Middlesex, and his ‘present employer’s name and address as ‘Sopwiths Aviation Coy, Ham, near Kingston Upon Thames’. (The Sopwith Aviation Company designed and manufactured aeroplanes during the First World War – they manufactured Snipe, Dolphin and Salamander fighter planes at their aircraft factory at Ham, near Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey).[12]

Five and half months later, he was again having trouble with his hernia.

On 2nd September 1918, he presented a medical certificate to the Officer-in-Charge, Australian Munitions Workers, England, that stated he was suffering from hernia and was unable to follow his employment, and reported that he was ‘going to St. Thomas’s Hospital to see if operation was necessary, as has been operated on before’ .[13]

Sometime after his arrival in England in October 1917, he met his future wife.

His wedding certificate records that Ernest Simpson, Munitions Worker, of 141 Waldegrave Road, Teddington, married Miss Lilian Margaret Lee, of Waldegrave Road, Teddington, on 31st December 1918 at the Register Office in the District of Kingston, in the County of Surrey.[14]

A letter to his Officer-in-Charge dated 1st January 1919 stated he was now married and wished to be repatriated to Australia.

War Worker Simpson, and his wife and infant child, departed England for return to Australia on the H.M.A.T. Benalla on 2nd April 1919.  They disembarked in Australia on 2nd June 1919.  He was discharged ‘completion of agreement’ the same day.

However, his hernia problems were not yet over.

Ernest Simpson, of address 123 Commonwealth Street, Sydney, declared in a Statutory Declaration dated 18th September 1919, that:

On my return to Australia by the S.S. “Benalla” on the 31st May, 1919, I was admitted to Hospital suffering from Hernia. That I underwent an operation in England and also since my return to Australia. That I was discharged from hospital on the 9th August last. That the Senior Medical Officer, Military Hospital, Sydney, advised me not to take on any heavy work for a few months”.[15]

His Commonwealth of Australia Department of Defence certificate of service finishes with the statement: ‘His record during the period of his agreement was satisfactory, War Worker Simpson, who has received medical attention from this Department, was discharged from hospital in Australia on 9th August 1919’.[16]

Note: I would like to acknowledge the research assistance of Gary Simpson in writing this article.

Helen Thompson

[1] THE GREAT RECRUITING MARCH. (1915, October 11). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 – 1930), p. 9. Retrieved June 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article239111014 ; SERVING THE AT FRONT (1915, October 22).

[2] ROUTE MARCH NOTES. (1915, October 19). The Farmer and Settler (Sydney, NSW : 1906 – 1955), p. 3. Retrieved June 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116648915

[3] FAILED TO PASS THE DOCTOR. (1915, October 19). The Farmer and Settler (Sydney, NSW : 1906 – 1955), p. 3. Retrieved June 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116648912

[4] SERVING THE AT FRONT (1915, October 22). Gilgandra Weekly (NSW : 1915 – 1929), p. 17. Retrieved June 9, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119923879

[5] The Alex Halden (Joe) Miller papers mainly relating to the Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March, New South Wales, 1912-1921, 1939, MLMSS 5081 ;  NAA: B2455, SIMPSON ERNEST

[6] NAA: MT1139/1, SIMPSON ERNEST – Munitions Worker Number 1156

[7] The Alex Halden (Joe) Miller papers mainly relating to the Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March, New South Wales, 1912-1921, 1939, MLMSS 5081

[8] NAA: MT1139/1, SIMPSON ERNEST – Munitions Worker Number 1156

[9] National Archives of Australia. Series details for: MT1139/1, First World War munition workers dossiers, https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/DetailsReports/SeriesDetail.aspx?series_no=MT1139/1

[10] MUNITION WORKERS WANTED. (1917, July 21). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 – 1930), p. 15. Retrieved June 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article239376091

[11] NAA: MT1139/1, SIMPSON ERNEST – Munitions Worker Number 1156.

[12] Wikipedia. ‘Sopwith Aviation Company’, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_Aviation_Company

[13] NAA: MT1139/1, SIMPSON ERNEST – Munitions Worker Number 1156, p. 11.

[14] Marriage Certificate of Ernest Simpson and Lilian Margaret Lee, Kingston, 31 December 1918. General Register Office, London, England.  (Details courtesy of Gary Simpson).

[15] NAA: MT1139/1, SIMPSON ERNEST – Munitions Worker Number 1156, p. 16.

[16] NAA: MT1139/1, SIMPSON ERNEST – Munitions Worker Number 1156, p. 21.

John Beveridge BUXTON

John Beveridge BUXTON

Private Jack Buxton (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 5/8/1916)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4737), John Beveridge Buxton was born at Five Dock, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 18 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 8 ½ inches tall, weight 135 lbs., with a fair complexion, hazel eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had 4 years universal military training [cadets]as previous military service.

His father George Buxton signed to give his consent on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form dated 11th November 1915.  He completed his medical examination at Parramatta on 11th November 1915.  He was attested by Lieutenant R. Howe at Parramatta on 11th November 1915.

After a successful recruiting meeting the evening before, where 41 men had offered themselves as recruits, the Coo-ees left Parramatta on the morning of 11th November 1915, with an official count of 27 new recruits from that town.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Buxton went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate noted that Buxton was one of the local soldiers leaving with the Coo-ees  ‘for the front’ on 8th March 1916.[3]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was his address was Royal Hotel, Church Street, Parramatta.[4]  His next of kin was listed as his father, G. Buxton, at the same address. (His father George Buxton was the licencee of the Royal Hotel at Parramatta).[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Buxton departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England along with many of the other Coo-ees.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 15th June 1916 a Courts Martial was held at Ismailia, Egypt, where Private Buxton was charged with stealing and receiving stolen goods. Private Buxton was found not guilty of stealing but found guilty of receiving stolen property. He was sentenced to 90 days Field Punishment No. 2 which was commuted to 40 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 17th June 1916 Private Buxton left Alexandria on a transport ship bound for France.  He arrived at  Marseilles on 25th June 1916.

The 5th Division Cyclist Company was moved into the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion upon it’s formation in July 1916.

On 9th October 1916 Private Buxton was detached for duty with the Town Major at Armentieres.  He re-joined his unit on 29th May 1917.

On 27th June 1917 he was detached to the Lewis Gun School.  He re-joined his unit in the field on 23rd July 1917.

The next day, on 24th July 1917, Private Buxton went on leave. He returned to the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 9th August 1917.

On 8th September 1917 he was detached to Lewis Gun Section.  He re-joined his unit from the Lewis Gun Section on 20th September 1917.

On 20th November 1917 he was detached for duty with 3rd Otago Battalion.  He returned to his unit on 25th November 1917.

On 27th November 1917 he was charged with being absent without leave from a 2 a.m.  working party on 25th November 1917. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 16th January 1918 Private Buxton was taken on strength of the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion from 22nd Corps Cyclist Battalion (late 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion).

On 23rd February 1918 Private Buxton was detached for duty with the 7th Field Company Australian Engineers.

On 19th March 1918 he was transferred to the 7th Field Company Australian Engineers in Belgium, and his rank changed from Private to Sapper.

On 13th June 1918 Sapper Buxton was evacuated to the 5th Australian Field Ambulance in France sick. He was sent back to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station. On 15th June 1918 he was admitted to the 55th General Hospital at Boulogne, France. On 19th June 1918 he was transferred to the 10th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne.

On 1st July 1918 he was moved to the Australian Convalescent Depot at Le Harve, France, where he was admitted on 2nd July 1918. He was discharged on 1st August 1918, and marched into the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve.

Sapper Buxton re-joined his unit in France on 8th August 1918.

On 31st August 1918 he was granted leave to England.

Sapper Buxton re-joined the 7th Field Company Engineers in France on 19th September 1918.  Upon returning he was charged with overstaying his leave to England by three days, from 14th to 17th September 1918. He was awarded 12 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 15 days pay.

On 15th December 1918 Sapper Buxton was detached for duty with the 2nd Australian Motor Transport Company.

He re-joined the 7th Field Company Engineers in France on 19th January 1919.

On 12th March 1919 Sapper  Buxton marched in to the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 15th March 1919 he was admitted to the 39th General Hospital at Le Havre with scabies. He was discharged on 20th March 1919.

On 25th March 1919 Sapper Buxton departed France bound for England. The next day he marched into No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

On 15th May 1919 Sapper Buxton departed England aboard the H.T. Ypiringa, bound for Australia.

On 20th May 1919 he was admitted to the ship’s hospital suffering from scabies. He was discharged from the ship’s hospital on 30th May 1919.

Sapper Buxton arrived in Sydney on 6th July 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 11th September 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, BUXTON J B

[2] THE PROCESSION. (1915, November 13). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 11. Retrieved December 30, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86101767

[3] WAR ITEMS.The “Coo-ees” off.  (1916, March 8). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 2. Retrieved March 12, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86082019

[4] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, John Beveridge Buxton, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[5] Parramatta Licensing Court (1913, December 20). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 4. Retrieved June 4, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article85974015

 

TIMELINE June 1918

TIMELINE June 1918

Saturday, 1 June 1918

Lance Corporal Thomas Walter DOWD (19th Battalion) was appointed as Second Lieutenant and was posted to Machine Gun Corps Reinforcements for the 2nd Machine Gun Battalion.

Private Thomas ANDERSON  (13th Battalion) arrived in Australia Sydney aboard the H.T. Borda for medical discharge.

Private Jacob Joseph Jacob John HERRINGE  (13th Battalion) was evacuated to England aboard the hospital ship Princess Elizabeth suffering trench fever, and was admitted to the Reading Military Hospital later that day.

Joseph Herringe and his mother Bridget Herringe (Photograph courtesy Marie Cribbin)

Sunday, 2 June 1918

Private Leslie Webster GREENLEAF  (13th Battalion) was placed aboard the 39th Ambulance Train, after being wounded on 20th May with a bomb wound to his left arm in the vicinity of Villers-Bretonneux.

Monday, 3 June 1918

Private Leslie Webster GREENLEAF  (13th Battalion) was evacuated to England by Hospital Ship Panama (gunshot wound left arm).

Tuesday, 4 June 1918

Private Leslie Webster GREENLEAF  (13th Battalion) was admitted to the Kitchener Military Hospital at Brighton, England.

Lance Corporal William Henry PEPPERNELL  (33rd Battalion) was wounded in action for a second time,  in the vicinity of Villers-Bretonneux, receiving a flesh wound to this left arm, and was sent to the 10th Australia Field Ambulance,  then moved to the 5th Casualty Clearing Station.

Friday, 7 June 1918

Private Walter CAVILL  (55th Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Suevic  for medical discharge.

Tuesday, 8 June 1918

Lance Corporal William Henry PEPPERNELL  (33rd Battalion) was admitted to the 12th General Hospital at Rouen, France.

Monday, 10 June 1918

Private Joseph PARRISH  (4th Machine Gun Battalion) was wounded in action in the vicinity of Villers-Bretonneux, where he received a gunshot wound to his neck, and was take to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance, and later that day taken to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station.

Lance Corporal William Henry PEPPERNELL  (33rd Battalion) was evacuated to England aboard the HS Grantully Castle.

Tuesday, 11 June 1918

Private Leslie Webster GREENLEAF  was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

Private Joseph PARRISH  (4th Machine Gun Battalion) was placed aboard the 17th Ambulance Train to be taken to the 53rd General Hospital at Boulogne, France.

Lance Corporal William Henry PEPPERNELL  (33rd Battalion) was admitted to the Horton County of London War Hospital at Epsom.

Wednesday, 12 June 1918

Private Joseph PARRISH (4th Machine Gun Battalion) was admitted to the 53rd General Hospital at Boulogne, France, with a gunshot wound to his neck, where he was also diagnosed with bronchial pneumonia.

Private Charles Henry MAIDENS  (13th Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Marathon for medical discharge.

Thursday, 13 June 1918

Private Leslie Webster GREENLEAF was discharged from hospital on leave from 13th June 1918, to report to No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 27th June 1918.

Friday, 14 June 1918

Private William Charles ELLERY (45th Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the H.T. Dunvegan Castle for medical discharge.

Saturday, 22 June 1918

Lieutenant John Robert LEE (21st Battalion) was discharged medically unfit.

Lieutenant J. R. Lee (Sydney Mail, 3/3/1920)

Monday, 24 June 1918

Private Andrew James MCGREGOR  (2nd Australian Field Bakery) was admitted to hospital with sclerosis spinal cord.

Andrew James McGregor (Daily Telegraph 22/9/1916)

Wednesday, 26 June 1918

Lance Corporal William Henry PEPPERNELL  (33rd Battalion) was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

Thursday, 27 June 1918

Private Joseph PARRISH  (4th Machine Gun Battalion) died of wounds at the 53rd General Hospital, Boulogne.  He was  buried in the Terlincthun British Cemetery, France.

Joseph Parrish’s headstone at Terlincthun British Cemetery, France (Photograph: H. Thompson 5/9/2014)

Lance William John SHANNON (4th Pioneer Battalion) departed England aboard the H.M.A.T. Essex bound for Australia for medical discharge.

Sunday, 30 June 1918

Private Andrew James MCGREGOR  was evacuated to hospital in England on 30th June 1918 (sclerosis spinal cord).

 

Eugene NORRIS

Eugene NORRIS

Pte. Eugene Roland Norris (Cumberland Argus & Fruitgrowers Advocate, 2/2/1918)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4566), Eugene Norris was born at Paddington, Sydney.[1] He gave his age as 21 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as horse driver. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 2 inches tall, weight 9 stone, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He was reported in The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate as being ‘one of the famous Coo-ees who marched through Parramatta’.[2]

His ‘Joined on’ date on his Attestation Paper was 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield). He was attested on 11th November 1915, and completed his medical examination at Liverpool on 13th November 1915. (An anomaly in his service record is that his ‘Oath to be taken by person being enlisted’ section in his Attestation Paper is recorded as having being taken at Liverpool, but the Attesting Officer’s signature is the same as for several of the other Coo-ees who were recorded as having being  attested at Ashfield on the same day).

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

He was one of 14 ‘local boys’ (along with several other Coo-ees) to be presented with a sheepskin vest and a money belt, and a wristlet watch, at a farewell held in the Elite Hall in Guildford on Thursday 9th December 1915.[3]

On 19th December 1915 Private Norris was charged with being absent without leave from 15th December 1915 until 19th December 1915. He was fined 1 pound.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Albert Parade, Guildford, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, W. [William] Norris, at the same address.[4]

On 16th February 1916 Private Norris was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas on active service, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 with the 14th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

He arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Battalion in Egypt.

On 12th May 1916 he was transferred to the 57th Battalion.

On 17th June 1916 Private Norris left Alexandria aboard H.T. Kalyan bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 24th June 1916.

Private Norris served with the 57th Battalion on the Western Front in France until 14th October 1916 Private Norris was sent to the 1st Casualty Clearing Station with keloid on his heel. The 57th Battalion had marched to billets at Estaires, France, the day before, and it was noted in the Battalion diary that ‘a few men suffered from slightly blistered feet due chiefly to new boots’.[5] On the 16th of October 1916 he was placed aboard a hospital train and evacuated to the 35th General Hospital at Calais, France.

He was discharged from hospital on 16th November 1916, and sent to the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 4th December 1916 Private Norris was charged with being absent without leave from the No. 1 Training Camp parade on 2nd December 1916, when the 57th Battalion was at Mametz, France. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2. On 10th December 1916 Private Norris re-joined the 57th Battalion camped at Montauban, France.[6]

On 20th August 1917 Private Norris was granted leave to England. He re-joined the 57th Battalion on 3rd September 1917.

On 27th October 1917 the 57th Battalion was being relieved by the 28th Battalion at Broodseinde, Belgium, when the Germans launched a gas barrage.[7] Private Norris was wounded by gas and a shrapnel wound to his thigh. He was moved back to the 3rd Canadian Casualty Clearing Station. On 28th October 1917 he was placed aboard the 32nd Ambulance Train and admitted to the 55th General Hospital at Boulogne, France.

On 5th November 1917 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Princess Elizabeth for evacuation to England. On 6th November 1917 he was admitted to the Colchester Military Hospital.

On 14th November 1917 he was transferred to Suffolk Hospital in Bury St Edmonds.

On 30th November 1917 he was granted leave to report to the No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England, on 14th December 1917.

On 2nd February 1918 Private Norris marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 21st February 1918 he departed Southampton bound for France. On 22nd February 1918 he marched into the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

He re-joined the 57th Battalion in France on 28th February 1918.

On 11th November 1918 Private Norris was granted leave to England.

On 25th November 1918 whilst still on leave he was admitted to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England sick. He was discharged on 12th December 1918 and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 15th December 1918.

He reported back from leave two days late on 17th December 1918 and was dealt with by the Orderly Room.

Private Norris departed England on 2nd January 1919 for return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Karmala, with the note ‘for influenza’.

He arrived in Australia on 22nd February 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 4th May 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, NORRIS EUGENE

[2] OF “THE BOYS.” (1917, November 17). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 11. Retrieved April 9, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86087988

[3] FAREWELLING. (1915, December 11). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 5. Retrieved April 23, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86106306

[4] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Eugene Norris, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/R1754195

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/74 – 57th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/74/9 – October 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/74 – 57th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/74/11 – December 1916.

[7] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/74 – 57th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/74/21 – October 1917.

Commemorative Projections in Parramatta ANZAC Day 2018

Commemorative Projections in Parramatta ANZAC Day 2018

After arriving in Parramatta on Anzac Day evening, a friend and I walking through Centenary Square came across St Johns Anglican Cathedral Memorial Arch, covered in a river of red felt poppies, and a fantastic commemorative Centenary of Anzac WWI light display being projected against the wall of St Johns Church.

Coo-ee Recruitment March at Parramatta, Centenary of ANZAC Commemorative Projection, artwork by Illuminart, presented by Parramatta City (Photograph: H. Thompson 26/4/2018)

Included in the featured images illuminating the church wall were some on the arrival of the 1915 Coo-ee Recruitment March in Parramatta, and individual photographs of two of the Parramatta Coo-ees Oliver James HARMON and Cyril Roy MCMILLAN.

Image of Oliver Harmon, Centenary of ANZAC Commemorative Projection, artwork by Illuminart, presented by Parramatta City (Photograph: H. Thompson 26/4/2018)

The animated projection installation, which had been prepared by Illuminart, was very well done, and amazingly, the eyes on the images of the individual men and women displayed blinked – several times!

We went back the following evening for a second look.

A Gallery of photographs from the commemorative projection, which was held from 16th to 27th April 2018, can be seen at https://illuminart.com.au/project/anzac-parramatta/

TIMELINE May 1918

TIMELINE May 1918

Thursday, 2 May 1918

Sergeant James Gerald CAMERON (45th Battalion) was wounded in action with a gunshot wound to his left shoulder during fighting around Villers-Bretonneux, and he was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance.

James Gerald Cameron (Photograph courtesy of his grandson Dennis Richards)

On the 2nd of May 1918 Private Jacob Isak PALMGREN (34th Battalion) was admitted to the 3rd Stationary Hospital at Rouen with Influenza.

Lance Corporal Reginald Henry CHAMBERLAIN (35th Battalion) was moved back to the 12th Casualty Clearing Station (after being gassed in the vicinity of Morlancourt, France, on 30th April 1918).

Private Leslie Webster GREENLEAF (13th Battalion) was with his Battalion defending Villers-Bretonneux when he undertook an action for which he was recommended for (and subsequently awarded with) the Military Medal. The citation read: ‘East of Villers-Bretonneux on the morning of the 2nd May, 1918, when an officer was severely wounded by M.G. fire and lay within full view of the enemy, Privates Greenleaf and Smith went to his assistance and carried him in at great personal risk. With the assistance of two other men they improvised a stretcher squad, and, as the case was a serious one, carried through with it to the Regimental Aid Post. This was done in broad day light, and practically the whole route was under observation of enemy snipers who were very active.’

Friday, 3 May 1918

Sergeant James Gerald CAMERON (45th Battalion) was evacuated to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station.

Corporal John MARTIN (54th Battalion) was sent to Hospital in England aboard a hospital ship, (with a gunshot wound to the chest he received on 24th April 1918 in the vicinity of  Villers-Bretonneux, France).

Saturday, 4 May 1918

Corporal John MARTIN (54th Battalion) was admitted to the 5th Southern General Hospital at Portsmouth, England.

Sergeant James Gerald CAMERON (45th Battalion) was admitted to the 1st Canadian General Hospital.

Private Thomas ANDERSON  (13th Battalion) departed Cape Town, South Africa, aboard the H.T. Borda, bound for Australia for medical discharge.

Private Charles Edward BOW (4th Pioneer Battalion) was discharged from the A.I.F. in Sydney medically unfit (chronic bronchitis).

Sunday, 5 May 1918

Lance Corporal Reginald Henry CHAMBERLAIN (35th Battalion) was moved to the 3rd Australian General Hospital at Abbeville, France.

Monday, 6 May 1918

Lance Corporal Frederick Graham HARVEY (4th Pioneer Battalion) was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance in France suffering from bronchitis, and he was moved to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station later that day.

Private Jacob Isak PALMGREN (34th Battalion) was discharged from the 3rd Stationary Hospital at Rouen and transferred to No. 2 Convalescent Depot at Rouen, then moved the next day to the No. 1 Convalescent Depot at Rouelles, France (recovering from influenza).

Tuesday, 7 May 1918

Trooper William Henry NICHOLLS (7th Light Horse Regiment) was one of those killed when eight enemy aeroplanes bombed the camp of the Regiment at Jericho, Palestine.

Lance Corporal Frederick Graham HARVEY (4th Pioneer Battalion) was placed aboard the 27th Ambulance Train in France.

Wednesday, 8 May 1918

Lance Corporal Frederick Graham HARVEY (4th Pioneer Battalion) was admitted to the 6th General Hospital at Rouen, France (bronchitis).

Thursday, 9 May 1918

Private Jack Graham WIGGINS (45th Battalion)  was discharged from hospital  in England (following being wounded in action receiving a shrapnel wound to his left thigh on 28th March 1918).

Pte. J. Wiggins (Sunday Times, 8/10/1916, p. 9)

Friday, 10 May 1918

Lance Corporal Reginald Henry CHAMBERLAIN (35th Battalion) was placed aboard a Hospital Train and taken to the coast in France.

Saturday, 11 May 1918

Lance Corporal Reginald Henry CHAMBERLAIN (35th Battalion) was evacuated to England by Hospital Ship, and admitted to the Whipps Cross Hospital at Leytonstone, England, on the same day.

Sunday, 12 May 1918

Lance Corporal Frederick Graham HARVEY (4th Pioneer Battalion) was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Grantully Castle for evacuation to England (bronchitis).

Monday, 13 May 1918

Lance Corporal Frederick Graham HARVEY (4th Pioneer Battalion) was admitted to the Winchester General Military Hospital in England.

Wednesday, 15 May 1918

Corporal John MARTIN (54th Battalion) was transferred to the 3rd Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

Private Cyril Roy MCMILLAN  (45th Battalion) (who had been reported Missing In Action on 5th April 1918 when the 45th Battalion had been in action around Dernacourt, France), was reported to be a Prisoner of War.

Private Roy McMillan (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 11/5/1918)

Friday, 17 May 1918

On 17th May 1918 Private Jacob Isak PALMGREN (34th Battalion) was discharged from hospital.

Corporal John MARTIN (54th Battalion) was discharged from hospital and went on leave reporting back to the 4th Convalescent Depot at Hurdcott, England, on 31st May 1918.

Private Jacob Isak PALMGREN (34th Battalion) was moved from the No. 1 Convalescent Depot at Rouelles where he had been recovering from Influenza  to the Australian Infantry  Base Depot on  Havre, France.

Monday, 20 May 1918

Private Leslie Webster GREENLEAF (13th Battalion) was wounded in action for a second time in the vicinity of Villers-Bretonneux, with a bomb wound to his left arm.  He was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance, the taken to the 47th Casualty Clearing Station.

Trooper Joe BILLING (7th Light Horse Regiment) was sent to the Australian Rest Station at Jericho, Palestine, suffering malaria.

Tuesday, 21 May 1918

Trooper Joe BILLING (7th Light Horse Regiment) was moved back to the 65th Casualty Clearing Station, then the 75th Casualty Clearing Station at Jerusalem (sick with malaria).

Sergeant James Gerald CAMERON (45th Battalion) was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

Wednesday, 22 May 1918

Private Norman Hamond FRANCISCO (4th Pioneer Battalion) was wounded  when his Battalion was bombed by enemy aircraft when it was  in billets around the  village of Busy, France, receiving a bomb wound to his leg.  He was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance.

Private Charles CREASE  (13th Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the H.T.  Field Marshall  for medical discharge.

Private Charles Crease (Sunday Times 8/10/1916)

3rd Air Mechanic William Allan Luther PHILPOTT  (69th Squadron, Australian Flying Corps) arrived in Australia aboard H.M.A.T. Field Marshall for medical discharge.

Thursday, 23 May 1918

Trooper Joe BILLING (7th Light Horse Regiment) was moved back by Hospital Train to the 47th Stationary Hospital at Gaza (sick with malaria).

Private Norman Hamond FRANCISCO (4th Pioneer Battalion) was moved back to the 5th Casualty Clearing Station.

Private Leslie Webster GREENLEAF (13th Battalion) was admitted to the 47th General Hospital at Le Treport, France.

Friday, 24 May 1918

Lieutenant John Robert LEE (21st Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the H.M.A.T.  Kanowna for medical discharge.

Lieutenant J. R. Lee (Sydney Mail, 3/3/1920)

Lance Corporal John Graham WATSON (13th Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the H.M.A.T.  Kanowna for medical discharge.

Saturday, 25 May 1918

Private Joseph Jacob John HERRINGE  (13th Battalion) was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance in France suffering pyrexia, then was moved back to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station later that day.

Joseph Herringe and his mother Bridget Herringe (Photograph courtesy Marie Cribbin)

Sunday, 26 May 1918

Private Joseph Jacob John HERRINGE  (13th Battalion) was placed aboard the 20th Ambulance Train, and evacuated to the 56th General Hospital at Etaples, France, where he was admitted the next day (where  he was later diagnosed with trench fever).

Monday, 27 May 1918

Lance Corporal Reginald Henry CHAMBERLAIN  (35th Battalion) was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

Private Norman Hamond FRANCISCO (4th Pioneer Battalion) was placed aboard the 10th Ambulance Train and admitted to the 47th General Hospital later that day (bomb wound to his right leg).

Tuesday, 28 May 1918

Trooper Leslie SULLIVAN (17th Company of the Imperial Camel Corps) was promoted to Lance Corporal in Egypt.

Wednesday, 29 May 1918

Lance Corporal Reginald Henry CHAMBERLAIN  (35th Battalion) was discharged from hospital and granted leave to report to the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England, on 12th June 1918.

Trooper Joe BILLING (7th Light Horse Regiment) was transferred from the 47th Stationary Hospital at Gaza to the 24th Stationary Hospital at Kantara, Egypt (sick with malaria).

Thursday, 30 May 1918

Trooper Joe BILLING (7th Light Horse Regiment) was transferred to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Abbassia, Egypt (sick with malaria).

Richard Charles WHEELER

Richard Charles WHEELER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5777), ‘Richard Charlie Wheeler’, as he signed his name, was born at Hammersmith, London, England.[1]  (His name is also recorded as Richard Charles Wheeler, and Charles Richard Wheeler, on various documents in his service record). He gave his age as 18 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 9 stone, with a dark complexion, bluish grey eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination on 8th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Gilgandra on 9th October 1915, before the commencement of the Coo-ee March.

‘Charles R. Wheeler’ was reported in The Farmer and Settler as one of the first 25 recruits to enlist at Gilgandra to join the Coo-ee March.[2]

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll, his name is recorded as ‘Charles Richard Wheeler’, and his address at time of enrolment was not recorded. His next of kin was recorded as his father, C. [Charles] Wheeler, 5 River Terrace, Crisp Road, Hammersmith, London, England.[3]

On 3rd May 1916 Private Wheeler departed Sydney on the HMAT A46 Clan McGillivray, along with fellow Coo-ees Private Herringe, Private Saunders and Private Keating, as part of the 18th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

He arrived in Egypt in June 1916.

On 6th August 1916 Private Wheeler departed Egypt bound for England aboard the Transport Megantic.

Upon arrival in England he marched into the 4th Training Battalion at Rollerstone, England.

On 7th October 1916 Private Wheeler was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 5th October 1916 until noon on 7th October 1916. He was awarded 48 hours detention, and fined 3 days pay.

On 14th October 1916 Private Wheeler departed England bound for France. He marched into the 4th Australian Infantry Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, later that day.

On 30th October 1916 Private Wheeler was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion when it was training at Vauchelles, France.[4]

On 1st February 1917 Private Wheeler reported sick. He was back with the Battalion on 3rd February 1917.

On 28th July 1917 Private Wheeler was charged with conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline by writing disrespectfully of his Superior Officer. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 18th September 1917 Private Wheeler went to England on leave. He re-joined the Battalion on 29th September 1917.

On 25th October 1917 Private Wheeler was detached to duty at the 3rd Australian General Hospital at Abbeyville, France.

On 13th April 1918 Private Wheeler was charged with neglect of duty in that he was absent from parade on the night of 11th February 1918. He was awarded 7 days field Punishment No. 2.

On 3rd May 1918 Private Wheeler was charged with whilst on active service drunkeness in Abbeville on 1st May 1918. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 26th June 1918 Private Wheeler was hospitalised with conjunctivitis. He was discharged on 30th June 1918.

On 14th July 1918 Private Wheeler was hospitalised with gastritis. He was discharged on 28th July 1918.

On 7th August 1918 Private Wheeler marched into the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 14th August 1918 he marched out to re-join the 13th Battalion. He re-joined the Battalion on 19th August 1918 when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Harbonnieres, France.[5]

On 27th September 1918 Private Wheeler went to England on leave. He returned to his unit from leave in France on 18th October 1918.

On 24th October 1918 he was charged  with overstaying leave in London from 0730 on the 12th of October 1918 till 0730 on the 17th of October 1918. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 19 days pay.

On 3rd April 1919 Private Wheeler marched out to England and reported to the 1st Training Brigade at Weymouth, England.

On 22nd May 1919 Private Wheeler was charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 15th May 1919 until 2200 on 16th May 1919. He was awarded 3 days confined to camp, and fined 1 days pay.

On 9th July 1919 ‘Richard Charles Wheeler’ married 19 year old Rose Gertrude Winifred Parsons at the All Soul’s Parish Church of Harlesden, England.

On 18th August 1919 Private Wheeler was charged with being absent without leave from 0900 on 4th August 1919 until 2400 on 5th August 1919. He was admonished and fined 2 days pay.

His service record records that Private Wheeler and his wife embarked for Australia on 8th October 1919 aboard the H.T. Benalla.

 They arrived in Australia on 29th November 1919.

He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 7th February 1920.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WHEELER RICHARD CHARLIE

[2] THE ROUTE MARCH (1915, October 12). The Farmer and Settler (Sydney, NSW : 1906 – 1955), p. 3. Retrieved April 14, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116668904

[3] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, ‘Charles Richard Wheeler’, HMAT Clan McGillivray A46, 3rd May 1916.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, October 1916.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/30 – 13th Infantry Battalion, August 1918.

Patrick GOOLEY

Patrick GOOLEY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4781), Patrick Gooley was born at Burrowa, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 43 years and 6 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as contractor. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 11 stone 11 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

Gooley was reported in the Wellington Times as one of the men who enlisted with the Coo-ees at Wellington.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Wellington). He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 20th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Stuart Town to Euchareena).

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 4th January 1916 Private Gooley was charged with being absent without leave from 16th December 1915 to 17th December 1915, and from 20th  December 1915 to 3rd January 1916.  He was fined 10 shillings, and forfeited 12 days pay.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 56 George Street, Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his wife, Mrs C. Gooley, Glanmere [sic], via Bathurst, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Gooley departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Gooley left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Gooley served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 29th November 1916 he was detached for duty with the Australian Army Service Corps.

He went on leave from France on 29th August 1917 to 8th September 1917.

Private Gooley served with the 26th Australian Army Service Corps until he re-joined the 45th Battalion on 7th October 1918.

On 17th October 1918 he was sent to the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Harve, France, for a Medical Board, where he was classed as having senility.

On 31st October 1918 he was transferred to England.

On 1st November 1918 he marched into the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 4th December 1918 Private Gooley departed England aboard the H.M.A.T. Somerset, bound for Australia for medical discharge.

He arrived in Australia on 16th January 1919.

He was discharged from the A.I.F. medically unfit on 4th February 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, GOOLEY P

[2] HITCHEN’S COO-EES. (1915, October 18). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388424

 

Edgar Lewis CUDDEFORD

Edgar Lewis CUDDEFORD (MM)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5352), Edgar Lewis Cuddeford was born at Albury, N.S.W.[1]  (His name was recorded as Edward Lewis Cudderford on his embarkation roll).[2] He gave his age as 18 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as ‘engineering’ on his Attestation Paper. (His occupation was listed as ‘Engineer’ on his embarkation roll, however he was an engineering apprentice at Clyde Engineering Company, with 1 year and 11 months served of a 5 year apprenticeship, at the time he enlisted).[3]  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 2 ½ inches tall, weight 110 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to have 4 years previous military service in the Senior Cadets.

He completed his medical examination at Parramatta on 10th November 1915 (where the Coo-ees held a recruitment meeting, and stayed that evening). He was attested by Lieutenant Edward V. Steel at Ashfield on 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Yelta, Station Street, Harris Park, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his mother, Mrs M. J. [Mary Jane] Cuddeford, Mahonga Station, via Albury, N.S.W.[4]

On 9th April 1916 Private Cuddeford departed Sydney on the HMAT Nestor A71 with the 17th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion (along with several other Coo-ees), bound for Egypt.

Photograph of HMAT A71 Nestor loaded with troops on an earlier voyage, taken 11 October 1915. Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. PB0607.

On 20th May 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 7th June 1916 Private Cuddeford left Alexandria aboard the transport Huntspill, bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

He was sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 9th August 1916 Private Cuddeford was taken on strength of the 45th Battalion when it was manning support trenches in the vicinity of Pozieres, France.[5]

Private Cuddeford served with the 45th Battalion through its actions on the Western Front as a Battalion Headquarters runner, undertaking dispatch work.

He managed to survive the war unscathed. He stated in an oral history interview undertake later in his life (in 1983), that ‘I was fortunate that way’ and that ‘I never got wounded’.[6]

On 11th March 1918 Private Cuddeford was granted leave to England. He re-joined the 45th Battalion in France on 3rd April 1918.

On 18th July 1918 Private Cuddeford was sent to the 4th Army Rest Camp. He re-joined the Battalion on 28th July 1918.

On 18th September 1918 the 45th Battalion was engaged in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Le Verguier, France,  in which Private Cuddeford took part.

He was later awarded a Military Medal. The citation reads: ‘For bravery and devotion to duty during attack of 18th September, 1918, on old British outpost line near LE VERGUIER. Private Cuddeford is a Battalion Headquarters Runner, and during the advance, continually carried messages under adverse and most trying circumstances to various portions of the attacking line, always returning and giving voluntary and correct information of the situation. During consolidation, and after, owing to casualties in runners Private Cuddeford on numerous occasions volunteered to take messages, always proving most reliable and cheerfully carrying out his duties.’[7]

Notification of Private Cuddeford’s  award was gazetted in Second Supplement No. 31512,  to The London Gazette, 20th August 1919 (page 10585), and was also published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, no. 135, dated 11th December, 1919.[8]

On 30th January 1919 Private Cuddeford marched out of the 45th Battalion to commence his return to Australia.

On 10th February 1919 he departed Le Harve, France, bound for England. He arrived at Weymouth on 11th February 1919.

On 13th April 1919 Private Cuddeford departed England aboard the H.T. Commonwealth bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 12th June 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 7th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L

[2] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Edward Lewis Cuddeford,  5352.

[3] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L  ; FIRST TO BE KILLED. (1916, September 2). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 11. Retrieved April 8, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86069235

[4] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Edward Lewis Cuddeford,  5352.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/6 – August 1916.

[6] Edgar Lewis Cuddeford MM (5352) as a private 45th Infantry Battalion AIF, France 1916-1918, interviewed by Dr Alistair Thomson on 6 September 1983, Australian War Veterans of the Great War – 1914 – 1918 Oral history project, 6 September 1983, AWM Accession no. S01308, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C88153

[7] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L

[8] The London Gazette, 19 August 1919, Supplement 31512, p. 10585,  https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/31512/supplement/10585 ; Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation (1919, December 11). Commonwealth of Australia Gazette (National : 1901 – 1973), p. 2373. Retrieved April 8, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232512820