Remembrance Day 2018

Remembrance Day 2018

100 years ago today, following the signing of the Armistice, the guns finally fell silent, and all fighting ceased on the Western Front at 11.00 am on the 11th of November, 1918, after four long years of continuous warfare.

Harold Brooks Davis’ headstone at St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 11/9/2016)

By this time in 1918, 40 of the 263 men who had enlisted on the 1915 Gilgandra to Sydney Coo-ee Recruitment March had died overseas while on active service, with one more to die in France from the Influenza epidemic a few weeks later.  The youngest died the day before his 16th birthday. Their stories can be read on the Coo-ee March Roll of Honour https://cooeemarch1915.com/honour-roll/

Coo-ees Walter Goodlet (left) and James Birrell Dawson (right), both amputees. Photograph courtesy of James Dawson’s great grandson Jamie Stacey.

At the time of the Armistice, many of the Coo-ees were still serving in their units along the Western Front. Five Coo-ees were prisoners of war behind the German lines. Many had been returned to Australia medically unfit, wounded and ill from their war service, some with missing limbs. Others were recovering in hospitals in France and England. Some were lucky enough to have been on leave at the time.

Private Roy McMillan (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 11/5/1918)

Ex-prisoner of war Private Cyril Roy MCMILLAN (45th Battalion) wrote the following letter to The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate about his experience following the Armistice, dated 30th November 1918, which was published in the paper on 18th January 1919:

 I left Parramatta three years ago, with the Coo-ees … I was taken prisoner in that big stunt last March and April  … You can’t imagine how happy we are to-day, now that we are released. We were released about two weeks ago.  They just cast us adrift and told us to find our way back.  They never gave us any bread to start with, not even a bite.  Only for the Belgians we should have had hundreds of deaths along the road.  But the Belgians cared for us in every manner possible … We crossed the British lines on the 17th Nov., and we were heartily greeted by our own lads.  Several of us had to go to hospital through sickness.  I am in hospital at present, but will be across to England for Christmas, and hope to be home in Parramatta shortly afterwards.[1]

William Hilton Saunders (Photograph courtesy of Macquarie Regional Library)

Wongarbon Coo-ee Driver William Hilton SAUNDERS (4th Division Ammunition Column) was on leave in Scotland at the time of the Armistice, and recorded his experience of this day, and of making his way to London for several more days of celebrating, in his war diary:

11 November 1918: Went down to Stuart McDonalds in Argyle St. & heard that the Armistice has been signed. Went to the Glasgow Herald office & made certain. After that was nothing but excitement every where. The streets were crowded with shouting, singing, cheering crowds of people. Champagne was flying in all directions. Had a great day & never saw such scenes of rejoicing before.

12 November 1918: Processions still marching about the streets & the whole town is bedecked with flags of all the victorious allies … At 8 pm left Glasgow for London and felt very sorry to leave Bonnie Scotland.

13 November 1918: Arrived in London at Kings Cross at 9.30 about 1 ½ hours late … I had a good clean up & good breakfast, then turned in for a sleep … During the afternoon went to Buckingham Palace & saw King George & Queen Mary and Princess Mary come back from their drive in the East End.

14 November  1918: London has sure gone mad. Everywhere is Bunting & flowers & crowds of singing … & everyone is bent on having a ripping time in peace celebrations. Peace. The word is almost foreign to me after all those months, those years, amongst such slaughter & devastation. But after all what is a bit of blood & a few dead men. We are all so used to it.

15 November 1918: … Got in a military lorry with a crowd of girls & some soldiers & did a night tour of London. We went everywhere. I don’t really know where we did go but somehow we went all night. What a night.

16 November 1918: Had a great day … Here I am pinched by the MPs & in Warwick Square quite forgot that my pass is overdue & I should have gone back. Oh yes days ago … [2]

Lest we forget.

 

[1] ‘German Atrocities. A Parramatta Prisoner’s Story’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 18 January 1919, p. 10. Retrieved March 12, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86118958

[2] Saunders, William Hilton, personal diary, 1918. Original dairy held by UNSW Canberra, Academy Library Special Collection. W. Hilton Saunders manuscript collection 1915-1965 MSS 64, Box 1, Folder 2, (no. 3) barcode 519825. State Library of NSW digital copy http://archival.sl.nsw.gov.au/Details/archive/110374600

 

John WILLIAMS

John WILLIAMS

Per his military service record (Depot), John Williams was born at Orange, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 33 years and 4 months, his marital status as widower, and his occupation as miner. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 8 stone 12 lbs., with a dark complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

John Williams left from Gilgandra to join the Coo-ees.

Dr Henry Peet signed the ‘Preliminary Medical Examination section’ on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form (addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Dubbo) at Gilgandra on 22nd October 1915. John Williams listed his postal address on this form as ‘Gilgandra’.

A. H. Miller, Organising Secretary of the Gilgandra-Sydney route march, from the Gilgandra Recruiting Association, sent a telegram from Gilgandra to Major Wynne, Gilgandra Coo-ees, Orange, stating that he ‘forgot [to] send Williams medical papers sending today mail to Orange’.[2]

John Williams completed his medical examination, and was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas, at Orange on 24th October 1915 (while the Coo-ees had a rest day at Orange).

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 14th December 1915 Private Williams was charged with being absent without leave from 8th December 1915 till 14th December 1915. He was recommended to be discharged.

On 15th December 1915 Private Williams was discharged not likely to become an efficient soldier.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WILLIAMS J

[2] Telegram from A. H. Miller to Captain Wynne October 1915 in: Alex Halden (Joe) Miller papers mainly relating to the Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March, New South Wales, 1912-1921, 1939. Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March correspondence and papers, 1915-1939.

Benjamin William DAVIS

Benjamin William DAVIS

Per his military service record (2320), Benjamin William Davis was born at Sydney, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 18 years and 2 months (although it appears he was only about 16 ½ years of age at the time), his marital status as single, and his occupation as greengrocer.[2] His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 3 inches tall, weight 8 stone 2 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed to have 18 months previous military service in the Senior Cadets.

‘B. W. Davis’ was named in The Blue Mountain Echo as one of the recruits who joined the Coo-ees at Katoomba.[3]

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway, on the 5th November 1915 at Katoomba.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 6th Light Horse Regiment.

Private Davis, along with several other local Coo-ees, including Privates Trow, Nimmo, Pettigrew, Perkins, Hayes, Duff, and Mason, was given a send-off at the Empire Theatre in Katoomba on Wednesday evening 15th December 1915, where Mayor James presented them with medals, and ‘spoke highly of the courage of the boys who marched away with the Coo-ees, and wished them every luck in the great fight they were undertaking’.[4]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was “Eden” Leichardt Street, Katoomba N.S.W.[5] His next of kin was listed as his father, B. W. Davis, at the same address.

On 3rd May 1916 Privater Davis departed Sydney on the HMAT Hymettus A1, with the 16th reinforcements for the 6th Light Horse Regiment.

On 22nd May 1916, whilst on the voyage to Egypt, Private Davis was charged with absenting himself without leave from all parades on 18th and 19th May 1916 and being a malingerer. He was awarded 120 hours detention.

After arriving in Egypt, Trooper Davis was taken on strength of the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-el-Kebir on 27th June 1916.

On 1st July 1916 Trooper Davis was admitted to the 2nd Australian Stationary Hospital sick.  He was admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Abbassia on 4th July 1916. He was discharged and returned to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment on 27th July 1916.

On 5th August 1916 Trooper Davis was transferred to the 6th Light Horse Regiment at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 14th January 1917 Trooper Davis was sent to the 2nd Australian Light Horse Field Ambulance for dental treatment. He returned to the Regiment on 15th January 1917.

He served with the 6th Light Horse Regiment until  23rd March 1918, when Trooper Davis was sent to the 2nd Australian Light Horse Field Ambulance sick. On 24th March he was moved back to the 66th Casualty Clearing Station. On 25th March 1918 he was moved to the 76th Casualty Clearing Station. On 27th March 1918 he was admitted to the 43rd Stationary Hospital. On 28th March 1918 he was transferred to the 24th Stationary Hospital at Kantara. On 29th March he was admitted to the 2nd Australian Stationary Hospital at Moascar. On 19th April 1918 he was transferred to the 14th Australian General Hospital.

On 26th April 1918 he was sent to a Rest Camp at Port Said. He was discharged on 15th May 1918 and sent to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Moascar.

On 18th June 1918 Trooper Davis was charged with when on active service ‘he at Cairo on the 16th of June 1918 made use of a document purporting to be a genuine pass well knowing that the date thereon had been altered’, and also with being absent without leave from 0900 on 13th June 1918 till apprehended by the Military Police in Cairo at 0945 on 16th June 1918. He was fined 4 days pay and awarded 28 days Field Punishment No. 2.

Trooper Davis re-joined the 6th Light Horse Regiment at Moascar on 25th July 1918.

On 17th December 1918 Trooper Davis was admitted to the 78th General Hospital suffering Lupus Vulgaris. On the 18th of December 1918 he was transferred to the 44th Stationary Hospital at Kantara, then onto the 14th Australian General Hospital at Abbassia later that day.

On 26th January 1919 Trooper Davis commenced his return to Australia from Suez aboard the HT Damosthenes for medical discharge.

He arrived in Australia on 2nd March 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 28th June 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, DAVIS B W

[2] NAA: B2455, DAVIS B W – Date of birth given as 14th April 1899 in a Statutory Declaration dated 19th May 1953.

[3] March O’er the Mountains. (1915, November 12). The Blue Mountain Echo (NSW : 1909 – 1928), p. 3. Retrieved September 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142

[4] Benefit to Our Boys. (1915, December 17). The Blue Mountain Echo (NSW : 1909 – 1928), p. 6. Retrieved April 7, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108041454

[5] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Benjamin William Davis, HMAT Hymettus A1, 3rd May 1916.

TIMELINE November 1918

TIMELINE November 1918

Wednesday, 6 November 1918

Corporal John Edward Leslie HOURIGAN  (45th Battalion) was promoted to Sergeant in France.

Corporal J. E. L. Hourigan (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate 12/8/1916)

Friday, 8 November 1918

Private Andrew James MCGREGOR  (2nd Australian Field Bakery) departed England aboard the HT Gaika bound for Australia for medical discharge.

Andrew James McGregor (Daily Telegraph 22/9/1916)

Monday, 11 November 1918

The guns fell silent, and all fighting ceased on the Western Front at 11.00 am when the Armistice, signed by senior Allied and German representatives in the forest at Compiègne in France earlier that morning, came into effect.

Friday, 15 November 1918

Sapper Henry John KING  (Anzac Mounted Division Signal Squadron) departed Suez Egypt for return to Australia aboard the HT Port Darwin for medical discharge

Tuesday, 19 November 1918

Private Percy Walter HOLPEN  (36th Battalion) was admitted to the 30th General Hospital at Calais, France, suffering from Influenza.

L. Cpl. W. Holpen, Redfern, Sydney. Died of Illness (Sydney Mail, 8/1/1919)

Tuesday, 26 November 1918

Private Percy Walter HOLPEN  (36th Battalion) died from Influenza – he was buried at Les Baraques Military Cemetery, Calais.

Percy Walter Holpen’s headstone, Le Baraques Military Cemetery, France (Photograph:S. & H. Thompson 29/8/2016)

Wednesday, 27 November 1918

Private William Laurence HUNT (45th Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the HMAT Runic for medical discharge.

Bill and Jack Hunt. Photograph courtesy of Iain and Judy Macdonald.

Saturday, 30 November 1918

Letter written by Cyril Roy MCMILLAN (45th Battalion) [ex prisoner of war] on this day was later published in The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate.  Extract: … We were released about two weeks ago.  They just cast us adrift and told us to find our way back.  They never gave us any bread to start with, not even a bite.  Only for the Belgians we should have had hundreds of deaths along the road.  But the Belgians cared for us in every manner possible … We crossed the British lines on the 17th Nov., and we were heartily greeted by our own lads.  Several of us had to go to hospital through sickness.  I am in hospital at present, but will be across to England for Christmas, and hope to be home in Parramatta shortly afterwards’.[1]

Private Roy McMillan (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 11/5/1918)

[1] ‘German Atrocities. A Parramatta Prisoner’s Story’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 18 January 1919, p. 10. Retrieved March 12, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86118958

Francis Birmingham BROWN

Francis Birmingham BROWN

Per his military service record (Depot), Francis Birmingham Brown was born in Jerilderie, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 44 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 5 inches tall, weight 143 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and ‘brown going grey’ hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed to have 5 weeks previous military service at Rosehill in 1914 but was allowed to leave after he ‘complained’ that the ‘physical drill affected’ him.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as Thomas Brown, Jerilderie N.S.W.

He joined the Coo-ees at Wellington.[2] He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Wellington).  He was attested at by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 20th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Stuart Town to Euchareena).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

His Statement of Service records that he served at the Infantry Depot at Liverpool until 9th January  1916 when he deserted from Liverpool Camp.  (Fellow Coo-ee Private Sloey from Wellington also deserted from Liverpool Camp on the same day.)

A warrant was issued for his arrest on 15th February 1916.

The Wellington Times reported on 7th April 1919 that ‘the death took place this morning at Wellington Hospital of Francis Brown, at the age of 50 years’, and that ‘he joined the Coo-ees when they came through Wellington, but was afterwards discharged as medically unfit’.[3]

The warrant for his arrest was withdrawn on 30th January 1919. His record is stamped ‘Discharged prior to leaving Australia’.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, BROWN F B

[2] NAA: B2455, BROWN F B

[3] OBITUARY. (1919, April 7). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved October 28, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143232113

 

Alfred James CARR

Alfred James CARR

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2155), Alfred James Carr was born at Wellington, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 25 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 11 inches tall, weight 168 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 18th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Wellington to Dripstone). He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 19th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Dripstone to Stuart Town).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp and joined the 15th reinforcements for the 6th Light Horse Regiment.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Maughan Street, Wellington N.S.W.[2] His next of kin was listed as his father, George Edward Carr, at the same address.

On 22nd March 1916 Trooper Carr (along with fellow Coo-ees Troopers Condon, Kennedy and Sullivan) departed Sydney on the HMAT A4 Pera, with the 15th reinforcements for the 6th Light Horse Regiment.

After arriving at Suez in Egypt, Trooper Carr was hospitalised suffering Mumps on 21st April 1916.

He was discharged from the Government Hospital at Suez, and taken on strength of the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-el-Kebir on 26th April 1916.

On 27th May 1916 Trooper Carr was admitted to the 3rd Australian General Hospital at Abbassia, Egypt, suffering Influenza.  He rejoined the Training Regiment at Tel-el-Kebir on 13th June 1916.

On 15th July 1916 he was taken on strength of the 12 Company of the 1st ANZAC Battalion of the Imperial Camel Corps Brigade at Abbassia.

On 2nd August 1916 Trooper Car was admitted sick to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Abbasia. He was discharged from hospital on 8th August 1916. He was taken on strength of the No. 11 Company of the Imperial Camel Corps at Moghara on 17th August 1916.

On 1st September 1916 Trooper Carr was admitted sick to the 17th General Hospital at Alexandria, Egypt. He was discharged from hospital on 11th December 1916.  (Trooper Carr had been transferred to the 3rd ANZAC Battalion of the Imperial Camel Corps on 11th November 1916). On 15th December 1916 he marched out the No. 1 Company of the Imperial Camel Corps.

On 24th March 1917 Trooper Carr was admitted to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Abbassia with septic sores on his left leg. He rejoined his unit on 17th June 1917.

On the 1st of September 1917 Trooper CARR was admitted sick to the 26th Stationary Hospital at Ismailia, Egypt, with Herpes zoster [shingles]. He was discharge from hospital on 9th September 1917. He was posted to 1st Battalion Imperial Camel Corps, and joined No. 1 Company, on 21st September 1917.

On 21st March 1918 Trooper Car went to hospital in the field sick. On 25th March 1918 he was admitted to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Port Said suffering from Psoriasis. He was discharged from hospital on 10th May 1918 and sent to a Rest Camp in Abbassia. He rejoined his unit on 31st May 1918.

On 1st July 1918 Trooper Carr was transferred to the 14th Light Horse Regiment.

On the 5th September 1918 Trooper Carr was admitted to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Port Said suffering a swollen groin. He was discharged from hospital on 25th   November 1918 and sent to a Rest Camp.

He was sent to Cairo on 28th November 1918, on 14 days leave.  He returned to Port Said from leave on 13th December 1918.

On 14th December 1918 Trooper Carr was admitted to the 2nd Australian Stationary Hospital sick. He was transferred to the 14th General Hospital at Abbassia on 3rd March 1919. He was discharged from hospital on 22nd March 1919.

On 23rd of March 1919 Trooper Carr marched out with  “Olden’s Force”,  a contingent  of 400 Australians led by Lieutenant-Colonel Olden, tasked with suppressing an Egyptian nationalist rebellion, which ‘moved up the Nile to engage a large rebel concentration at Bedrasheen’.[3]

On 8th April 1919 Trooper Carr was admitted to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Abbassia suffering from ulcers of the abdominal wall. He was discharged to a Rest Camp at Port Said on 17th April 1919.

Trooper Carr departed Port Said, Egypt, aboard the H.T. Dorset on 29th April 1919, commencing his return to Australia for medical discharge (ulcers).

He arrived in Australia on 11th June 1919.  He was discharged medically unfit on 26th July 1919.

Trooper A. J. Carr was one of a number of returned soldiers who was named in the Wellington Times on 27th November 1919, who were to be welcomed home to Wellington and presented with a gold medal. After a concert programme, over 200 gold medals were presented to local returned soldiers before a large crowd at the Skating Rink in Wellington on Wednesday night, 3rd December 1919. They then adjourned to the Oddfellows Hall for light refreshments, and dancing.[4]

[1] NAA: B2455, CARR A J

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Alfred James Carr, HMAT Pera A4, 22nd March 1916. Note his address is misspelt as ‘Manghan’ Street.

[3] Ian Jones, ‘Olden, Arthur Charles (1881–1949)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/olden-arthur-charles-7899/text13735, published first in hardcopy 1988, accessed online 13 October 2018.

[4] WELLINGTON WELCOME HOME. (1919, November 27). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved October 13, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article141615694 ; WELCOME HOME TO SOLDIERS. (1919, December 4). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved October 13, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article141610945

 

TIMELINE October 1918

TIMELINE October 1918

Tuesday, 1 October 1918

Private John William THOMPSON  (54th Battalion) was admitted to the 4th General Hospital at Camiers, France, following being wounded in action for the 2nd time on 29th September, receiving a gunshot wound to his left hand.

Saturday, 12 October 1918

Private John William THOMPSON  (54th Battalion) was placed aboard a hospital ship for evacuation to England – he was admitted to the Ontario Military Hospital at Oplington, England, later that day.

Saturday, 19 October 1918

Private George EAVERS  (4th Pioneer Battalion) was discharged medically unfit.

Tuesday, 29 October 1918

Private John William THOMPSON  (54th Battalion) was discharged from hospital and granted leave, to report to the No. 4 Command Depot  on 12th November at Hurdcott, England.

TIMELINE September 1918

TIMELINE September 1918

Sunday, 1 September 1918

Corporal John MARTIN  (54th Battalion) was killed in action during the successful assault on Peronne, France – he was buried in Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension, at Peronne, France.

John Martin’s headstone at Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson, 9/9/2016)

Private Jacob Isak PALMGREN  (34th Battalion) who had been  wounded in action for a second time in France with a gunshot wound to his nose on 31st August 1918, was admitted to the 2nd General Hospital in Le Havre, France, then was transferred to the No. 1 Convalescent Depot at Le Havre on 7th September 1918.

Tuesday, 3 September 1918

Second Lieutenant Thomas Walter DOWD (2nd Australian Machine Gun Battalion) was wounded in action with a gunshot wound to the face and hands.  He was admitted to the 5th Field Ambulance suffering shrapnel wounds to the face and hand. He was moved back to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station, then to the 20th General Hospital, at Camiers, France.

Lance Corporal William John SHANNON (4th Pioneer Battalion) was discharged medically unfit [Hallux Valgus].

Friday, 6 September 1918

Private Alfred WARDROP  (45th Battalion) was discharged medically unfit [amputation left leg].

Alfred Wardrop (Courtesy of Gary Wardrop)

Thursday, 12 September 1918

Private Jacob Isak PALMGREN  (34th Battalion) was discharged from No. 1 Convalescent Depot at Le Havre.

Wednesday, 18 September 1918

Private Bernard COYTE (13th Battalion) was killed in action during an attack launched by the 13th Battalion on the German lines south of the village of Le Verguier, France – he was buried at the nearby Jean Court Communal Cemetery Extesion.

Bernard Coyte, ca. 1915 (Photograph: Australian War Memorial P09199.001)

Private B. Coyte’s headstone at Jeancourt Communal Cemetery Extension, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson, 9/9/2016)

Gunner  James TAYLOR (4th Field Artillery Brigade) was wounded in action with  gunshot wounds to his thighs – he was moved back to an Australian Field Ambulance, then to the 20th Casualty Clearing Station. He was then placed aboard the 3rd Ambulance Train and moved to a hospital in Rouen France, where he was admitted on 19th September 1918.

Sergeant James Gerald CAMERON (45th Battalion) for his action on this day during an attack west of Bellenglise in France, was subsequently awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

James Gerald Cameron (Photograph courtesy of his grandson Dennis Richards)

Private Edgar Lewis CUDDEFORD (45th Battalion) for his action on this day as a runner during an attack in the vicinity of Le Verguier in France, was subsequently awarded the Military Medal.

Friday, 20 September 1918

Second Lieutenant Thomas Walter DOWD (2nd Australian Machine Gun Battalion) was discharged from the 20th General Hospital, at Camiers, France.

Saturday, 21 September 1918

Gunner James TAYLOR (4th Field Artillery Brigade) was placed aboard a hospital ship for evacuation to England.

Sunday, 22 September 1918

Gunner James TAYLOR (4th Field Artillery Brigade) was admitted to the Alexandria Hospital at Cosham, England, with a severe gunshot wound to the thigh.

Monday, 23 September 1918

Private William Laurence HUNT (45th Battalion) departed England aboard the H.M.A.T. Runic for return to Australia for medical discharge.

Bill and Jack Hunt (Photograph courtesy of Iain and Judy Macdonald)

Friday, 27 September 1918

Private George DAVIDSON  (4th Pioneer Battalion) was discharged medically unfit [deformity to the left elbow].

Saturday, 28 September 1918

Private Percy Frederick COOPER  (45th Battalion) was promoted to Lance Corporal.

Sunday, 29 September 1918

Private John William THOMPSON  (54th Battalion) was wounded in action in France for a second time with a gunshot wound to his left hand – he was sent to a Field Ambulance, then to the 30th Casualty Clearing Station.

James TAYLOR

James TAYLOR

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2253), James Taylor was born at Shadforth, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 21 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 5 inches tall, weight 10 stone 4 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

The Wellington Times named ‘James Taylor, son of Mr. Taylor, of the cyanide works’ as one of six recruits who ‘handed in their names’ after a recruiting address was given at Bodangora by Private W. J. Johnson (who was also the Mayor of Auburn), who was accompanying the Coo-ees from Wellington to Orange to assist with the recruiting speeches.[2] He was one of three recruits (along with Leslie J. Sullivan), who were driven in to Wellington the next morning to join the Coo-ees.[3]

James Taylor completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Wellington. It appears that James Taylor decided to go home to Shadforth near Orange first before joining the Coo-ee March, as written on the top of the first page in his service record is that he ‘Presented himself at Orange 25/10/15’.[4]

‘James Taylor (Shadforth)’ was named with three other men in the Leader on 22nd October 1915 as having ‘volunteered to join in the Coo-ee march as recruits when they arrive in Orange’.[5]

He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Orange on 25th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Orange to Millthorpe).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp and joined the 15th reinforcements for the 1st Light Horse Regiment.

The Wellington Times reported that at a farewell held for Trooper Leslie Sullivan at Bodangora on 7th February 1916, he  was entrusted  with a ‘fountain pen in a silver case’ to give to ‘Trooper Jimmy Taylor’, who had enlisted  with him from Bodangora.[6]

The Leader reported that Private Taylor was given a send-off at Shadforth in early February 1916, where ‘he was presented with a gold wristlet watch and a safety razor, as a token of esteem and good will of the people of Shadforth’.[7]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Shadforth, via Lucknow, N.S.W.[8] His next of kin was listed as his father, John Taylor, at the same address.

On 21st March 1916 Trooper Taylor departed Sydney on the HMAT A26 Armadale with the 15th reinforcements for the 1st Light Horse Regiment.

After arriving in Egypt, he was taken on strength of the 1st Light Horse Training Regiment on 24th April 1916 at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 15th May 1916 Trooper Taylor was transferred to the Artillery Details at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 28th May 1916 Gunner Taylor left Alexandria aboard the H.M.T. Corscian, bound for England.  He arrived at Plymouth on 12th June 1916.

On 29th June 1916 Gunner Taylor left Southampton aboard the tansport Duchess of Argyll, bound for France.  He disembarked at Rouen on 30th June 1916. He was attached to the 4th Division Ammunition Sub-Park.  He was transferred to this unit on 15th November 1916.

On 10th August 1917 Gunner Taylor was sent to the 15th Corps Rest Station with an injury to his knee. He re-joined his unit on 15th August 1917.

On 22nd September 1917 Gunner Taylor was granted leave to England. He returned from leave on 4th October 1917.

On 8th October 1917 Gunner Taylor was admitted to the 18th Casualty Clearing Station sick. On 11th October 1917 he was sent to the 7th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France. On 13th October 1917 he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital.

He was discharged from hospital on 10th January 1918, and sent to the Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 24th January 1918 Gunner Taylor marched out to join the 6th Army Brigade Australian Field Artillery Park Section, which he joined on 27th January 1918.

On 27th June 1918 Gunner Taylor was transferred to the 11th Battery  4th Australian Field Artillery Brigade.

On 18th September 1918 Gunner Taylor was wounded in action in France receiving  gunshot wounds to both thighs. He was moved back to an Australian Field Ambulance, then to the 20th Casualty Clearing Station, where he was placed aboard the 3rd Ambulance Train. He was admitted to a hospital at Rouen on 19th September 1918.

On 21st September 1918 he was placed aboard a hospital ship for evacuation to England. On 22nd of September 1918 he was admitted to the Alexandra Hospital at Cosham, England, with a severe gunshot wound to the thigh.

On 12th November 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England. He was discharged from hospital on 15th November 1918, and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England, on 29th November 1918.

On 14th January 1919 Gunner Taylor left England on the H.T. City of York, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 27th February 1919.

He missed a welcome home that had been held for him and another local soldier on Friday evening, 7th March 1919, when ‘many Shadforth and Millthorpe residents assembled at the local railway station’ to greet them both, as he had been ‘detained in hospital’.[9]

The Leader reported on 12th March 1919 that ‘Private James Taylor arrived home last week unexpectedly’, and had been ‘in town’ and ‘looks well, although he says he has had some very rough experiences, but, now that he is back, he has no complaints’.[10]

He was discharged medically unfit on 9th May 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, TAYLOR J

[2] DISTRICT NEWS. Bodangora. (1915, October 21). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved July 15, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143396661

[3] DISTRICT NEWS. Bodangora. (1915, October 21). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved July 15, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143396661

[4] NAA: B2455, TAYLOR J

[5] RECRUITS FOR THE COO-EES (1915, October 22). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 6. Retrieved February 28, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842491

[6] SEND OFF TO TROOPER LESLIE SULLIVAN. (1916, February 10). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 7. Retrieved July 29, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143392079

[7] Millthorpe News, Send-off to Pte. J. Taylor’,  Leader, 11 February 1916, p. 6, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117790612

[8] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, James Taylor, HMAT Armadate A26, 21st March 1916.

[9] PRIVATE HUSSELL RODWELL BACK HOME. (1919, March 10). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 6. Retrieved July 29, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117856581

[10] PERSONAL. (1919, March 12). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 3. Retrieved July 29, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117856700

 

TIMELINE August 1918

TIMELINE August 1918

Thursday, 1 August 1918

Lance Corporal William John SHANNON  (4th Pioneer Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Essex for medical discharge.

Private George EAVERS  (4th Pioneer Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Essex for medical discharge.

Saturday, 3 August 1918

Private William Charles ELLERY  (45th Battalion) was discharged medically unfit [chronic rheumatic arthritis].

Sunday, 11 August 1918

Corporal Alfred Fletcher MCLEAN (2nd Divisional Artillery Column) was wounded in action near Warfusee-Abancourt in France  with a gunshot wound to his neck. He was sent to the 5th Australian Field Ambulance.

Monday, 12 August 1918

Corporal Alfred Fletcher MCLEAN (2nd Divisional Artillery Column) was admitted to the 55th Casualty Clearing Station.

Tuesday, 13 August 1918

Corporal Alfred Fletcher MCLEAN (2nd Divisional Artillery Column) was admitted to the No. 11 Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France.

Private William CAIRNS  (13th Battalion) was discharged in Sydney medically unfit [trachoma].

Monday, 19 August 1918

Corporal Alfred Fletcher MCLEAN (2nd Divisional Artillery Column) was evacuated to England on a hospital ship.

Private Albert DENZEL (45th Battalion) for his action manning a Lewis gun in the vicinity of Lihons, France, was subsequently awarded a Military Medal.

Tuesday, 20 August 1918

Corporal Alfred Fletcher MCLEAN (2nd Divisional Artillery Column) was admitted to the Bath War Hospital in England.

Wednesday, 21 August 1918

Private William Allan Luther PHILPOTT  (69 Squadron Australian Flying Corps) was discharged medically unfit [D.A.H.].

Private William Henry GRIFFITHS  (Australian Motor Transport Service) married Miss Kathleen Spires at Christ Church, Chelsea, England.

Friday, 23 August 1918

Private Jacob Isak PALMGREN (34th Battalion) was slightly wounded in action when the 34th Battalion was in the line near Vaire-sous-Corbie, France. He remained on duty with the Battalion.

Saturday, 31 August 1918

Private Jacob Isak PALMGREN (34th Battalion) was wounded in action for a second time with a gunshot wound to his nose, when the 34th Battalion was attacking along the Somme River between Bray and Curlu, France.  He was admitted to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station.