Monthly Archives: January 2017

William COLLYER

William COLLYER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4752), William Collyer was born at Wongarbon, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 19 years and 3 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as butcher. (He was the son of Thomas William Collyer and Flora Collyer). [2] His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 10 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He completed his certificate of medical examination on the 17th October 1915 at Wellington (while the Coo-ees were at Wellington). However he was not attested until 24th October 1915 by Captain Nicholas at Orange. A note at the top of his Attestation Paper reads ‘Presented himself 24/10/1915 with form signed by Metcalfe [the doctor at Wellington]. Sworn in 24/10/15’.

His Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form, addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Wellington, was signed by both his father Thomas Collyer and stepmother Ellen Collyer, so perhaps he had travelled back to Wongarbon to get the consent of his parents, before he caught up with the Coo-ees at Orange. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

‘William Colyer’ [sic] was listed in The Leader as one of the men who were recruited at Orange to join the Coo-ees.[3]

‘W. Collyer’ was listed as one of the ‘Wongarbon boys’ with the Coo-ees in The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate.[4]

After completing the remainder of the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The Wellington Times reported that Privates W. Collyer and H. Saunders  were presented with wristlet watches by the residents of Wongarbon at a farewell social while they  were home on final leave on 3rd March 1916.[5]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wongarbon, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, T. Collyer, Wongarbon, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Collyer, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Tel-el-Kebir, and was taken on strength of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.  He was also mustered as a Driver.

On 25th May 1916 he was transferred to the Artillery Training Depot at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 28th May 1916 Gunner Collyer left Alexandria on the HMT Corsican, bound for England.  He disembarked at Plymouth on 12th June 1916, for further training.

On 30th July 1916 Gunner Collyer departed England bound for France.

On 9th August 1916 Gunner Collyer was taken on strength of the 4th Division Ammunition Column in France, while it was training in the vicinity of the village of Acquin, 9 miles from St. Omer.

On 14th October 1916 his rank was changed to Driver.

On 7th March 1917 Driver Collyer’s rank was changed back to Gunner.

On 29th November 1917 Gunner Collyer was granted leave to England.

On 13th December 1917 whilst on leave in England, he was admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England, sick.  He was discharged from Hospital on 1st April 1918.

On 2nd April 1918 he marched into to No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny in England.

On 24th May 1918 he marched out to the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 3rd July 1918 Gunner Collyer departed Southampton for return to Le Havre, France.

Gunner Collyer rejoined his unit on 14th July 1918, when the 4th Division Ammunition Column was at Frenchencourt, France.

On 9th March 1919 Gunner Collyer left his unit, and marched into the Base Depot at Le Harve to commence his return to Australia. He departed France on 31st March 1919.

He arrived at Weymouth, England, on 1st April 1919, where he marched into the No. 4 Command Depot.

On 12th May 1919 Gunner Collyer departed England for return to Australia aboard the HT Port Napier (along with Wongarbon Coo-ee Driver Saunders).

Gunner Collyer arrived in Sydney on 5th July 1919, and was discharged on the 19th of August 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, COLLYER W

[2] NSW Birth Registration 35916/1896 William A Collyer.

[3] ‘The Recruits’, Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 4. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599

[4] ‘Our Soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate,  29 October 1915, p. 4. Retrieved January 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601711

[5] ‘At Wongarbon’, Wellington Times,  9 March 1916, p. 6. Retrieved November 29, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143398796

 

Photograph of William Hilton Saunders and William Collyer

Photograph of Wongarbon Coo-ees William Hilton Saunders and William Collyer

William Hilton Saunders and WIlliam Collyer, 1916 (Photograph courtesy of Mrs K. Edmonds)

William Hilton Saunders and William Collyer, 1916 (Photograph courtesy of Mrs K. Edmonds)

Mrs K. Edmonds has sent me this studio portrait photograph of her grandfather William Hilton Saunders with another soldier, who she thinks is his friend and fellow Coo-ee from Wongarbon, William Collyer.

Driver William Hilton Saunders is seated on the left in the photograph.

William Hilton Saunders mentioned that both he and William Collyer had grown moustaches in the first letter he sent home to his parents at Wongarbon, after arriving in Egypt:

You would not know Will and I now, we both have moustaches, and I weigh 70 kilogrammes, which is equivalent to about 11 stone, so you see I have put on a considerable amount of flesh already since leaving Australia”.[1]

The backdrop behind the two soldiers in the photograph appears to depict the ruins of St Martin’s Cathedral at Ypres in Belgium.  William Hilton Saunders would have been familiar with this scene.  He noted in his diary on Friday, 29th September, 1916:

‘’I went out with G S W [General Service Wagon] & team to Ypres (about 6 miles) for bricks. Cruel yet interesting sight to witness. A fair town in peace time, but was utterly devoid of life except for soldiers who have to live in old cellars etc. Everything is one mass of ruins & where buildings are not blown right down enormous gaping shell holes mark the billet of some of Fritz’s death messengers.  We got a couple of loads of bricks from the Ypres church & arrived back early this morning, out all night”.[2]

On reading William Hilton Saunder’s 1916 to 1918 diaries, I only found one entry in which he refers to having had his photo taken during this period.

On Sunday, 22nd October 1916, he wrote: “Will Collyer & I went to Poperinghe on leave. Rode our mules & had a good look around. Both had our photos taken. Poperinghe about the size of Dubbo …”.[3]

Driver William Hilton Saunders and Driver William Collyer were both in the 4th Division Ammunition Column, which was stationed in the vicinity of the village of Vlamertinghe at that time, about half way along the road from Ypres to Poperinghe in Belgium. It was about 12.5 km (8 miles) from Ypres to Poperinghe. [4]

It seems likely therefore that this is the photograph of William Hilton Saunders and William Collyer that William Hilton Saunders referred to in his diary.

[1] ‘Australians in Action. Letters from the Front’, Wellington Times, 29 June 1916, p. 3. Retrieved January 23, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article137412087

[2] Saunders, William Hilton, personal diary, 1916. Original diary held by UNSW Canberra, Academy Library Special Collection.

[3] Saunders, William Hilton, personal diary, 1916.

[4] The Great War 1914-1918, ‘Poperinge (Poperinghe), http://www.greatwar.co.uk/ypres-salient/town-poperinge.htm

Loring ASHHURST

Loring ASHHURST

Per his military service record (Depot), Loring Ashhurst stated on his Attestation Paper that he was born at Montreal, Canada.[1] (He stated on his naturalization application papers dated August 1916 that he was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in the United States of America).[2] He gave his age as 39 years and 9 months, his marital status as single (although it appears he was married), and his occupation as miner. His description on his certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 160 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was recorded as Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He listed Alice Ashhurst, Linsley Street, Cobar, N.S.W., as his next of kin on his Attestation Paper. He listed his postal address as ‘Cobar, N.S.W.’ on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form.

The Wellington Times reported  ‘Askhurst’ as one of the 8 named men who offered themselves at the recruiting meeting held at Wongarbon.[3]  His surname is spelt differently in several newspaper articles.

He completed his medical examination on the 16th October 1915 at Wellington (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Wellington), and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Dripstone on the 18th October 1915.

A Medical History form in his service record shows he was admitted to Orange District Hospital during his time in the Coo-ee March from 23rd October 1915 to 25th October 1915 (while the Coo-ees were at Orange), with ‘congestion base right lung’, induced by ‘exposure to wet’.

Loring Asshurst appears to have been one of the 5 men reported in The Bathurst Times to have been admitted to Orange Hospital ‘suffering from influenza’ following a ‘drenching ‘.[4]  It had poured rain on the Coo-ees the morning they left Molong, on their way to Orange, on 23rd October 1915.[5]

He rejoined the Coo-ees after being in hospital at Orange.  A letter in the official correspondence of the march from W. T. Hitchen, Wallerawang, 31/10/15, addressed to Mrs Ashhurst, Cobar, reads:

Dear Mrs Ashhurst, your husband is still with the Coo-ees and is in good health. You will no doubt have heard from him before this.  Under the conditions of the march it is rather difficult at times to attend to correspondence …’[6]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp to the Infantry Depot.

‘Askhurst’ was included in a list of ‘Wellingtonians at the front’ in the Wellington Times on 9th December 1915.[7]

The Statement of Service for Private Ashhurst in his service record shows his period of service was from 18th October 1915 until 9th January 1916.  He is listed as ‘Deserter’ in the Remarks column.

On 9th January 1916 Private Ashhurst of the Cooees Regiment or Corps was charged with desertion.  A warrant was put out for his arrest on 16th February 1916.

On 14th March 1916 Private Ashhurst was arrested at Cobar by the Civil Police. He was escorted back to the Liverpool Camp by the Military Police.

The Western Age reported that ‘A Cobar resident named Loring Ashurst, who enlisted with the Coo-ees, was arrested by police on Tuesday as a military deserter, notwithstanding the fact that he holds his discharge from Liverpool camp, dated 9th December last, stating that he was medically unfit’, and that ‘The military authorities claim that the discharge is irregular’.[8]

Loring Ashhurst sent a letter to the Editor of the Western Age, in which he stated ‘Upon arriving at Liverpool camp and being brought before the proper officers it only required a little explanation on my part to prove to them that it was through no fault of mine that the discharge, which I possessed, was irregular, but the fault of a military acting Adjutant-General’, and that ‘I consider that I have been treated very shabbily, after having done my best’.[9]

Private Ashhurst was discharged services no longer required on 17th March 1916.

[1] NAA: B2455, ASHHURST L.

[2] NAA: A1, 1916/22239  Loring Centennial Ashhurst, Naturalization application, August 1916.

[3] ‘On the Track’, Wellington Times, 18 October 1915, p. 3. Retrieved January 15, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388423

[4] ‘The “Coo-ees”’, The Bathurst Times, 26 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved January 15, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111234699

[5] ‘The Route March’, The Farmer and Settler, 26 October 1915, p. 3. Retrieved January 15, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116655979

[6] Alex Halden (Joe) Miller,  Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March correspondence and papers, 1915-1939, letter from W. T. Hitchen to Mrs Asshurst, Cobar, 31 October 1915.

[7] ‘Serving the Empire’, Wellington Times, 9 December 1915, p. 8. Retrieved January 15, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143397726

[8] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 17 March 1916, p. 2. Retrieved January 15, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136725191

[9] To the Editor’, Western Age, 21 March 1916, p. 2. Retrieved January 15, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136724511

 

TIMELINE January 1917

TIMELINE January 1917

Monday, 1 January 1917

Private James MCKEOWN (45th Battalion) was evacuated to England sick with bronchitis.

Sunday, 2 January 1916

Private James MCKEOWN (45th Battalion) was admitted to the Lewisham Military Hospital in England with bronchitis after evacuation from France.

Thursday, 4 January 1917

James MAHER (13th Battalion) was promoted to Lance Corporal.

James Maher, 1915 (Photograph courtesy of L. Leo)

James Maher, 1915 (Photograph courtesy of L. Leo)

Saturday, 6 January 1917

Private George Arthur FAWBERT was discharged due to defective vision at Liverpool Camp.

Tuesday, 9 January 1917

Privates Percy Edward BLACKWOOD  and  Patrick Joseph O’LOUGHLIN (O’LOUGHLEN) (both  reinforcements for the 3rd Battalion )arrived at Devonport in England on the HMAT A24 Benalla.

Private Richard John CROCKER  (reinforcement for the 60th Battalion) arrived on the HMAT Afric at Plymouth in England.

Wednesday, 10 January 1917

Private John Thomas SMITH (4th Pioneer Battalion) was wounded in action with a gunshot wound to the stomach, while working on a railway line near Longueval in France.

2nd Lieutenant Harry DAVENPORT (aka Harry SWENDSON) (reinforcement for the 4th Infantry Battalion) arrived at Devonport on the SS Port Nicholson.

Harry Davenport (Photograph courtesy of Dave Murray)

Harry Davenport (Photograph courtesy of Dave Murray)

2nd Lieutenant John Robert LEE (reinforcement for the 24th Battalion) arrived in England on the HMAT A8 Argyllshire.

Lieutenant J. R. Lee (Sydney Mail, 3/3/1920)

Lieutenant J. R. Lee (Sydney Mail, 3/3/1920)

Private Joseph William EDWARDS (reinforcement for the 3rd Battalion) and Private Henry NEIRHOFF (reinforcement for the 13th Battalion) arrived in Devonport aboard the SS Port Nicholson.

Friday, 12 January 1917

Private John Thomas SMITH (4th Pioneer Battalion) was admitted to the 12th General Hospital at Rouen in France.

Saturday, 13 January 1917

Private Harold Roy Devlin UHR was discharged medically unfit in Australia (2nd enlistment, he did not leave Australia).

Sunday, 14 January 1917

Private Thomas SHAW (4th Pioneer Battalion) boarded the hospital ship Kanowna at Southampton for return to Australia (he had been wounded at Pozieres on 7th August 1916 with gunshot wounds to the left leg and neck).

Tuesday, 16 January 1917

Private Francis Charles FINLAYSON (reinforcement for the 13th Battalion) embarked for France from England.

Thursday, 18 January 1917

Private Percy Walter HOLPEN (46th Battalion) received a gunshot wound to his chest in the trenches in front of Fricaurt in France. He was evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station.

L. Cpl. W. Holpen, Redfern, Sydney. Died of Illness (Sydney Mail, 8/1/1919)

L. Cpl. W. Holpen, Redfern, Sydney. Died of Illness (Sydney Mail, 8/1/1919)

Saturday, 20 January 1917

Private Francis Albury HOLLAND  (45th Battalion) was discharged in Australia medically unfit (he had arrived back in Australia in December 1916 with epilepsy).

Monday, 22 January 1917

Reginald Henry CHAMBERLAIN re-enlisted at Victoria Barracks in Sydney.

Wednesday, 24 January 1917

Jacob Isak PALMGREN (reinforcement for the 45th Battalion) embarked from Sydney on the HMAT A68 Anchises, bound for England.

Private Percy Walter HOLPEN (46th Battalion) was admitted to the 3rd Stationery Hospital at Rouen in France wounded with a gunshot wound to his chest.

Sunday, 28 January 1917

Private Percy Walter HOLPEN (46th Battalion) was placed on a hospital ship at Le Havre for evacuation to England.

Monday, 29 January 1917

Private William SMITH (4602 Gilgandra) (reinforcements for the 30th Battalion) arrived in Devonport in England on the HMAT Beltana A72.

Private Percy Walter HOLPEN (46th Battalion) was admitted to the 1st London General Hospital.

Private James MCKEOWN (45th Battalion) was transferred from the Lewisham Military Hospital to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford [bronchitis].

Wednesday, 31 January 1917

Private George Arthur FAWBERT re-enlisted for home service with the Headquarters Band at Liverpool Camp.

Richard John CROCKER

Richard John CROCKER

Per his military service record (Depot), Richard John Crocker was born at Croydon, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 18 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as brickmaker.  His description on his Certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 128 lbs, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  His next of kin on his Attestation paper was listed as his mother, Mrs Alice W. Crocker, Brighton Avenue, Croydon, N.S.W.  He completed his medical examination and was attested by Lieutenant Edward  J. Shaw at Ashfield, on 11th November 1915.  He claimed to have four years previous military experience with the 39th Regiment.

After joining the Coo-ee March at Ashfield, he went to Liverpool Camp.  However, his time with the Coo-ees would be short, as he was underage.

A letter from Lieutenant Stanley Stilling from the Ashfield Drill Hall dated 16th November 1915 in his file states that ‘Mrs Crocker … called at this Office this evening, and states that she will not consent to her son Richard Crocker, 16 ½ years old, and who is a Trainee of the Area – going with the A.I.F. and asks for his discharge. Crocker volunteered here, and was duly Medically examined, etc., in connection with the Gilgandra Recruits’.[2]

A letter from his mother Alice Crocker dated 18th November 1915 is also in his file, in which she states ‘My son Richard Crocker enlisted with the Gilgandra Coo-ees last Thursday night against my wish as he is only 16 last May and I think far too young, I want you to send him home at once, please’.[3]

He was discharged parents request, being underage, on 25th November 1915.

Less than a year later, Richard John Crocker re-enlisted in the A.I.F.  He completed his Certificate of medical examination at Victoria Barracks on 20th September 1916, and was attested at the Show Ground Camp at Sydney on 25th September 1916.

A letter dated 19th September 1916 in his file signed by both his parents gave consent for their son to enlist. However he was still underage.  He had stated that he was 18 years and 3 months of age in this application to enlist, but this was later changed to 17 years and 4 months on his Certificate of medical examination. A copy of his Birth Certificate in his service record dated 20th March 1917 shows that his date of birth was 13th May 1899.

Private Crocker was allocated to the 7th reinforcements for the 60th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Ashfield, N.S.W.  His next of kin was listed as his father, Edwin Crocker, 53 Arthur Street, Ashfield, N.S.W.

Private Crocker (regimental no. 2873) embarked from Sydney on the HMAT Afriq A19 on 3rd November 1916.  He disembarked at Plymouth on 9th January 1917.

He marched into the 15th Training Battalion at Hurdcott, England on 10th January 1917.

On 10th May 1917 Private Crocker was transferred to the Australian Army Medical Corps, and he marched into the Medical Corps Training Depot at Parkhouse, England.

He later wrote in a letter to the O.C., Victoria Barracks: ‘I went away in 1916 but was under age so I was transferred from the 7/60th to the A.M.C. I was constantly in Hospital work and I volunteered 3 times to go up to the line but I was in the operating theatre & did not get shifted’.[4]

On 4th September 1917 he went to Parkhouse Hospital with a headache.  He returned to the A.M.C. Training Depot on 10th September 1917.

On 29th September 1917 Private Crocker was taken on the staff of the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 13th June 1918 Private Crocker was admitted to the Hospital suffering Influenza. He was discharged on 16th June 1918.

On 27th January 1919 Private Crocker was detached for duty at the 1st Australian General Hospital at Sutton Veny, England.

On 23rd March 1919 he was admitted to the Hospital suffering Influenza. He was discharged on 4th April 1919, and sent to the Training Depot.

On 13th of May 1919 [his 20th birthday], Private Crocker was granted leave, to report back on 25th  May 1919.

Private Crocker commenced his return to Australia on  2nd July 1919, aboard the H.T.  Karmala.  He disembarked at Sydney on 17th August 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 6th October 1919.

[1] NAA: B2455, CROCKER R J

[2] NAA: B2455, CROCKER R J, letter to Headquarters, A.I.F.Camp, Liverpool, from Lieut. Stanley Stilling, Area Officer, 39th Infantry, 16 November 1915

[3] NAA: B2455, CROCKER R J, letter from Alice Crocker, 18 November 1915

[4] NAA: B2455, CROCKER R J, letter to O.C., Victoria Barracks, from Richard John Crocker, [1936].

Thomas SHAW

Thomas SHAW

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4896), Thomas Shaw was born at Draycott in the Clay, Staffordshire, England.[1] He gave his age as 36 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farmer labourer. His description on his certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 11 stone 2 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination on the 16th October 1915 at Wellington (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Wellington), and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Stuart Town on the 19th October 1915. His “Joined on” date on his Attestation Paper was 18th October 1915, the day the Coo-ees left Wellington, and marched to Dripstone.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was not recorded, and his next of kin was listed as his sister, Mrs P. White, Bruce Bridge, Heath, Lincoln, England.

On 8th March 1916 Private Shaw along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 16th April 1916 Private Shaw was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 4th June 1916 Private Shaw left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian, bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Just two months later, on 7th August 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was constructing communication trenches in Becourt Wood, France, when Private Shaw was wounded in action, receiving gunshot wounds to his left leg, and neck. He was evacuated to the 4th General Hospital at Camiers, France, the next day.

On 20th August 1916 he was moved to Calais, France, and transferred to England aboard the Hospital Ship Newhaven.  He was admitted to the Carrington Military Hospital at Nottingham, England on 21st August 1916.

On 2nd September 1916 Private Shaw was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On the 23rd of October 1916 Private Shaw was moved to the 3rd Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford with Myalgia.

On 14th January 1917 Private Shaw departed Southampton, England, on the Hospital Ship Kanowna, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 11th March 1917, and was discharged Medically Unfit on 29th August 1917.

[1] NAA: B2455, SHAW THOMAS

Francis Albury HOLLAND

Francis Albury HOLLAND

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4800), Francis Albury Holland was born at Wyong, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 22 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 ½ inches tall, weight 141 lbs., with a medium complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had 4 months previous military service with the Australian Rifles.

He completed his medical examination on the 2nd November 1915 at Lithgow, and was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Lithgow on 2nd November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Alison Road, Wyong, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs. L. [Louisa] Holland, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Holland departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, arriving in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Holland left Alexandria aboard the Transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 8th  June 1916.

Private Holland served with the 45th Battalion in France until 27th July 1916, when he was admitted to the 1st New Zealand Stationary Hospital at Amiens, France, suffering from Epilepsy.

On 31st July 1916 he was transferred to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Rouen, France.

On 4th August 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Marama at Havre for evacuation to England.

He was admitted to the 2nd Birmingham War Hospital in England on 6th August 1916.

Private Holland was discharged on 13th September 1916, and sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 17th October 1916 Private Holland departed Portland, England, aboard the H.M.A.T. Ajana, bound for Australia.

On 20th November 1916 he was charged with Breaking Hospital at sea on 17th November 1916. He was awarded 24 hours detention.

Private Holland arrived in Australia in early December 1916, and was discharged medically unfit on 20th January 1917.

[1] NAA: B2455, HOLLAND F A 4800

George Arthur FAWBERT

George Arthur FAWBERT

Per his military service record, George Athur Fawbert on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form gave his age as 28 years, his marital status as married, and his occupation as carpenter.[1] (There is no Attestation Paper in his military service record for this enlistment). His postal address on the Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form was Craigend Street, Leura. He passed the preliminary medical examination at Katoomba on 5th November 1915, and was provisionally accepted for enlistment in the Australian Imperial Force by Lieutenant F. Middenway at Katoomba on 6th November 1915. The Coo-ees held a recruiting meeting, and stayed overnight at Katoomba, on 5th November 1915.

‘G. A. Fawbert’ was listed in The Blue Mountain Echo as one of the men who ‘marched out’ with the Coo-ees at Katoomba.[2]

However, his Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form was amended on 12th January 1916 to being unfit for active service due to defective vision.

A separate military service record with regimental no. N43066, shows George Arthur Fawbert re-enlisted a few months later, where he was attested, and passed his certificate of medical examinatinon at Leura, on 3rd April 1916.[3]  On this Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad, he stated that his place of birth was Bristol, England. He gave his age as 28 years, his marital status as married, and his occupation as carpenter (musician). His description on his certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 10 stone 2 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes “6/6 with glasses”, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.   He listed his next of kin as his wife, May Fawbert, Craigend Street, Leura. He did not mention his previous enlistment with the Coo-ees, stating he had no previous military experience.

His “Joined on” date was 26th June 1916, when he was sent to Depot Battalion at Bathurst Camp.

On 18th August 1916 Private Fawbert was transferred to the 54th Battalion.

On 14th November 1916 he was transferred to Liverpool Camp.

On 30th January 1917 Private Fawbert was discharged medically unfit with deficient vision.

The next day, George Arthur Fawbert re-enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force for home service with the Headquarters Band based at Liverpool Camp.[4] On this Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Home Service, he stated he was born in the Parish of Katoomba in or near the town of Leura. He gave his age as 28 years 10 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation at music teacher.  He listed his next of kin as his wife, May Fawbert, Leura. He stated he has ten months previous experience in the A.I.F. and was discharged medically unfit. His certificate of medical examination on 31st January 1917 passed him “fit for Band”.  He was attested at Liverpool on 31st January 1917.

On 6th May 1918 Bandsman Fawbert was charged at the Liverpool Camp with disobedience of orders, by leaving an instrument in a hut not under cover, and not folding blankets before leaving hut, on 2nd May 1918. He was severely reprimanded.

He served with the Headquarters Band at Liverpool until he was discharged on 18th December 1918 Termination of Period of Enlistment.

[1] NAA: MT1486/1, FAWBERT/GEORGE ARTHUR

[2] ‘March o’er the Mountains. Gilgandra to the Sea. “Coo-ees En Route’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 12 November 1915, p. 3. Retrieved January 8, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142

[3] NAA: B2455, FAWBERT G A [Note incorrectly indexed under George Alfred Fawbert]

[4] NAA: MT1486/1, FAWBERT/GEORGE ARTHUR