Monthly Archives: February 2015

Archibald MCINTYRE

Archibald MCINTYRE

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2708), Archibald McIntyre enlisted twice in the AIF. Archibald McIntyre was born at Glasgow, Scotland. On his first enlistment (during the Coo-ee March), he gave his age as 31 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 2 inches tall, weight 9 stone 10 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 26th October 1915 at Blayney, and was attested by Captain Eade at Blayney on the 26th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Whilst at Liverpool Camp Private McIntyre went before a medical board on 17th November 1915 where he was deemed unfit for military service due to defective vision. He was discharged on the 29th November 1915.

In a letter dated 16th April 1916 Archibald McIntyre wrote “I was rejected for eyesight but as they have reduced the test I intend to give it another try”.[1]

On the 19th May 1916 Archibald McIntyre applied again to join the AIF. He attended the Royal Agricultural Showground in Sydney, and stated in this application that he had 35 days previous military service in the AIF, and was rejected on grounds of eyesight. He underwent a medical on the 19th May 1916 which he passed. He was attested on the 20th May 1916 at the Royal Agricultural Showground.

Private McIntyre went into camp and began training at Cootamundra on the 23rd May 1916, then to Goulburn on the 22nd June 1916. He remained at Goulburn till the 4th September 1916 when he was transferred to the 56th Battalion and went to Sydney being taken on strength of the 6th reinforcements for the Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Portland N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as father, William McIntyre, 161 Pollok Street, Glasgow, Scotland.

Private McIntyre departed Sydney on the HMAT A40 Ceramic on the 7th October 1916. He arrived in Plymouth, England, on the 21st November 1916. After further training in England he departed Folkestone, England, aboard the SS Princess Victoria for France on the 21st December 1916. He underwent further training in France at the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples. He joined the 56th Battalion on 1st February 1917 whilst it was in reserve and providing fatigue parties at Bernafay south of Pozieres, France.

On the 22nd March 1917 the 56th Battalion was in reserve in the vicinity of Bancourt, France, when Private McIntyre was evacuated to hospital sick. On the 24th March 1917 he was diagnosed to be suffering from Bronchitis. On the 25th March at the 2nd/1st South Midland Casualty Clearing Station Private McIntyre was diagnosed with Cerebro Spinal Meningitis. He died the next day.

Private McIntyre was buried in the Puchevillers British Cemetery, France, on 26th March 1917.

Archibald McIntyre's headstone at Puchervillers British Cemetery, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson 5/9/2014)

Archibald McIntyre’s headstone at Puchevillers British Cemetery, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson 5/9/2014)

Private McIntyre’s name is commemorated on panel 162 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Note: Archibald McIntyre’s father wrote on his Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour Circular that he came to Australia when he was 22, and that he ‘sailed round world once or twice as a sea apprentice in a sailing ship. Traded from Australia to New Zealand for a time. Joined in the Coo-ee March. Two brothers in British Army (one killed).’[2]

[1] McIntyre, Archibald. Letter to [A. H. Miller], 16th April 1916, Alex Halden (Joe) Miller papers mainly relating to the Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March, New South Wales, 1912-1921, 1939, held at the Mitchell Library (State Library of N.S.W.)

[2] Archibald McIntyre 2708 Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour Circular, http://static.awm.gov.au/images/collection/pdf/RCDIG1068881–64-.PDF

Puchevillers British Cemetery – France

PUCHEVILLERS BRITISH CEMETERY

On 5th September 2014 Stephen and I drove to Puchevillers British Cemetery, which is located near the village of Puchevillers, which is about 19 km north-east of Amiens.

According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website http://www.cwgc.org/, the 3rd and 44th Casualty Clearing Stations came to Puchevillers in June 1916 just before the start of the Battle of the Somme, and used Plots 1 to 5, and almost all of Plot 6 until March 1917. The cemetery was then used by the 2nd/1st South Midland Casualty Clearing Station for the next two months. Plot 7 contains mostly the graves of soldiers who died in the German advance in 1918.

There are 1,763 First World War soldiers buried in this cemetery.

Archibald McIntyre, a labourer on enlistment per his service record, who joined the Coo-ees at Blayney, is the only Coo-ee buried in this cemetery (in Plot 6). He died of illness on 26th May 1917.

The photograph below shows Private McIntyre’s grave (2nd from the right) at Puchevillers British Cemetery.

Puchevillers British Cemetery, Puchevillers, Somme, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson 5/9/2014)

Puchevillers British Cemetery, Puchevillers, Somme, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson 5/9/2014)

A photograph of the headstone on Archibald McIntyre’s grave will be placed on his individual blog entry, and form part of a Roll of Honour for the fallen Coo-ees on this blog.

Charles Henry HUNT

Charles Henry HUNT

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4804), Charles Henry Hunt was born at Hargreaves, N.S.W. He gave his age as 43 years, his marital status as widower, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 6 feet 1 ½ inches tall, weight 176 lbs., with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and medium brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

According to William Laurence Hunt’s and Jack Henry Hunt’s service records, Charles Henry Hunt signed consent forms (for persons under 21 years of age) for his two sons to enlist on 7th October 1915. According to the Bathurst Times, their father saw them off in the start of the Coo-ee March at Gilgandra, ‘but the thought of the parting was too much for him’.[1]

He went to Dubbo to enlist, and completed his medical on the 28th October 1915 (two weeks after the Coo-ees had passed through Dubbo), and was attested at Dubbo on the 28th October 1915. He then proceeded to Bathurst to catch up with the Coo-ees. According to the National Advocate, ‘on the road from Bathurst to Yetholme … a father, hearing that his two sons were amongst the marchers, overtook them near Raglan, was examined and took his place alongside his two sons’.[2]

After catching up with his two sons and the Coo-ees on Friday 29th October between Bathurst and Yetholme, he completed the Coo-ee March and went to Liverpool Camp, as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wingadee, Coonamble, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as daughter, Miss P. O. [Pearl Olive] Hunt, St. Patrick’s Convent, Dubbo, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Hunt, along with his two sons, and many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Hunt left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 8th June 1916.

Private Hunt served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then moved with it to Pozieres in early August 1916. On the 16th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was being relieved from the front line trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, France. Private Hunt was evacuated to the 7th Field Ambulance with shell shock and bruises. He rejoined the Battalion after only a short absence.

On the 28th October 1916 the 45th Battalion was training at Brucamps, France when Private Hunt was evacuated to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Rouen, France, suffering from Pleurisy. He was discharged on the 24th November 1916 and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, arriving on the 25th November 1916. On the 4th December 1916 Private Hunt was admitted to the 26th General Hospital. On the 7th December 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria sailing from Calais, France, for evacuation to England, suffering from Debility.

On the 11th December 1916 Private Hunt marched into the Number 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England. On the 25th January 1917 he was transferred to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England. On the 30th January 1917 Private Hunt underwent a medical board where it was determined that he suffered from Pleurisy and Rheumatism and he was classified as not suitable for active service nor home service.

On the 17th March 1917 Private Hunt departed England aboard the HMAT Beltana bound for Australia. He arrived in Sydney on the 15th May 1917, and was discharged as medically unfit on the 9th June 1917.

[1] ‘The Coo-ees’, The Bathurst Times, 10 October 1916, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109934579

[2] A “Tramp falls in. Father joins his two sons’, National Advocate, 30 October 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158152728

Jack Henry HUNT

Jack Henry HUNT

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4806), Jack Henry Hunt was born at Coonabarabran, N.S.W. He gave his age as 18 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as station hand. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 7 lbs., with a dark complexion, hazel eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service. Along with his brother William Laurence Hunt, he completed his medical on the 9th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested at Gilgandra on the same day by Captain Nicholas – the day before the commencement of the Coo-ee March. His service record included a consent form signed by his father C. H. Hunt.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp, together with his father Charles Henry Hunt (who had caught up with the Coo-ees between Bathurst and Yetholme) and brother William Laurence Hunt, as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

At Liverpool on the 3rd February 1916, Private Hunt was charged with being absent from Parade on 2nd February 1916.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wingadee, Coonamble, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as sister, Miss P. O. Hunt, St. Patrick’s Convent, Dubbo, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Hunt, along with his father and brother, and many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

He was admitted to No. 2 Australian Stationary Hospital with mumps at Tel el Kebir on 18th April 1916.

On the 20th May 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion.

On the 7th June 1916 Private Hunt left Alexandria aboard the Transport Huntspill bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 14th June 1916.

Private Hunt served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916, then through the fighting around Pozieres in August 1916.

On the 7th September 1916 Private Hunt was with the 45th Battalion at Beauval, France, refitting and reorganising. On this day Private Hunt was charged with Eating Reserve Iron Ration without permission (on the same day his brother William Laurence Hunt was charged for the same offence). He was awarded Forfeiture of One Day’s pay.

On the 28th October 1916 the 45th Battalion was at Brucamps, France conducting training Private Hunt was sent to hospital sick. It is not indicated how long he was away for but it is not believed to have been long.

On the 12th November 1916 the 45th Battalion was at Bernafay Wood south of Longuveal, France preparing to go to the front when Private Hunt was evacuated to the 15th Australian Field Ambulance with a sprained ankle. Private Hunt rejoined the Battalion when it was holding the front line in front of the village of Gudecourt, France on the 24th November 1916.

On the 27th February 1917 the 45th Battalion was marching from Mamentz to Beaucourt Camp when Private Hunt was evacuated to the 45th Casualty Clearing Station suffering from Trench Feet. On the 28th of February 1917 he was placed aboard the 9th Ambulance Train and moved back to the 3rd Canadian General Hospital at Bolougne, France.

On the 2nd March 1917 Private Hunt was evacuated to England aboard the Hospital Ship Aberdonian sailing from Bologne, France. On the 3rd March 1917 he was admitted to the Voluntary Aid Hospital at Cheltenham, England with trench feet (severe). He was later transferred to the 2nd Southern General Hospital where the third toe of his right foot was amputated.

On the 8th August 1917 Private Hunt was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England. On the 11th August 1917 Private Hunt was granted leave to report to the Number Two Command Depot at Weymouth, England on the 25th of August 1917.

On the 19th October 1917 Private Hunt began his return to Australia departing England on board the H.T. Port Lyttleton. He arrived in Australia on the 16th December 1917, and was discharged as medically unfit on the 28th January 1918.

William Laurence HUNT

William Laurence HUNT

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4805), William Laurence Hunt was born at Coonabarabran, N.S.W. He gave his age as 20 years and 3 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 10 stone 12 lbs., with a dark complexion, hazel eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service. Along with his brother Jack Henry Hunt, he completed his medical on the 9th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested at Gilgandra on the same day by Captain Nicholas – the day before the commencement of the Coo-ee March. His service record includes a consent form signed by his father C. H. Hunt (for persons under 21 years of age).

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp, together with his father Charles Henry Hunt (who had caught up with the Coo-ees between Bathurst and Yetholme) and brother Jack Henry Hunt, as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wingadee, Coonamble, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as sister, Miss P. O. Hunt, St. Patrick’s Convent, Dubbo, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Hunt along, with his father and brother, and many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 19th April 1916 Private Hunt was transferred to the 45th Battalion.

On the 1st June 1916 Private Hunt left Alexandria aboard the Transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 7th June 1916.

Private Hunt served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France, in July 1916. He then moved with the Battalion to Pozieres in early August 1916. On the 14th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was relieving the 46th Battalion in trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, France. During this relief Private Hunt was one of 15 members of the Battalion wounded. His wound was slight and he returned to the unit on the 16th August 1916.

On the 7th September 1916 Private Hunt was with the 45th Battalion at Beauval, France, refitting and reorganising. On this day Private Hunt was charged with Eating Reserve Iron Ration without permission (on the same day his brother Jack Henry Hunt was charged for the same offence). He was awarded Forfeiture of One Day’’ pay.

On the 24th November 1916 the 45th Battalion was holding the front line in front of Guedecourt, France. Private Hunt was evacuated to the 38th Casualty Clearing Station with trench feet. On the 25th November 1916 he was placed aboard the 7th Ambulance Train and moved to the 6th General Hospital at Rouen, France, arriving on the 26th November 1916. On the 29th November 1916 Private Hunt boarded the Hospital Ship Formosa at Le Harve for journey to England. On the 30th November 1916 he was admitted to the War Hospital at Stratford Upon Avon, England. On the 13th February 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

On the 19th February 1917 Private Hunt was granted leave to report to the Number One Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England, on the 6th of March 1917.

On the 8th March 1917 Private Hunt was charged for Being Absent Without Leave from 3.30 pm on the 6th March 1917 till 4.00 pm on the 7th March 1917. He was awarded three days confined to camp and fined two days pay.

On the 16th March 1917 Private Hunt was transferred to the Number Two command Depot at Weymouth, England. On the 2nd June 1917 he was sent to the Overseas Training Depot. On the 25th June 1917 Private Hunt departed Southampton, England, bound for France. He arrived at Le Harve on the 26th June 1917, and marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot. On the 29th June 1917 he went before a Medical Board and was classified PB (Permanent Base).

On the 9th July 1917 Private Hunt was sent back to England, arriving at Southampton on the 10th July 1917. He was sent to the Number Two Command Depot at Weymouth that same day. On the 22nd November 1917 Private Hunt commenced a course of instruction at the Winchester Engineering Works.

On the 23rd September 1918 Private Hunt began his return to Australia, departing England on board the HMAT Runic. He arrived in Australia on the 27th November 1918, and was discharged medically unfit on the 31st January 1919.

William Emerton HUNTER

William Emerton HUNTER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4807), William Emerton Hunter was born at Sydney, N.S.W. He gave his age as 21 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as wheat lumper. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 11 inches tall, weight 172 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He joined the Coo-ees at Geurie. He completed his medical on the 16th October 1915 at Wellington, and was attested at Dripstone by Captain Nicholas on the 19th October 1915.

When the Coo-ees were in Orange, he was to receive some sad news from his mother. The incident was reported in an article titled ‘Tragedy of the War’ in The Leader, as follows: ‘When the Coo-ees arrived at Wade Park on Saturday there was a big parcel of mail waiting for the members of the patriotic band. One fine hefty young fellow named Hunter held out his hand for his letter, and with a smile on his face, walked to the end of the pavilion to read it. He knew by the handwriting on the envelope that it was from his mother in Sydney, who was waiting eagerly for her boy to arrive, at the end of the glorious march from back o’ beyond. He had hardly scanned the first few lines when tears bedimmed his eyes, and then he burst out into a paroxysm of grief. The letter read, “My darling boy.-It is sad news I have to tell. Your two brothers who left Sydney with the 18th Battalion were killed in action on the 27th of August. Be brave, my boy, and try to bear it as your mother and sisters are trying to do. I will send you 10/ on Monday if I have the money.” There was much more of a private nature, and those who were handed the letter to read were visibly affected. The young fellow was broken-hearted, but even the sad blow has not deterred him from carrying out his intentions of going to the front, and now he is doubly eager to be off and avenge .his brothers’ death. The Mayor has given £5 of the money collected for the Coo-ees’ entertainment to the poor lad’s mother. His brothers entered the firing line on the 14th, and were in action till they received their death wounds.’[1]

According to newspaper reports, money raised from a collection made for Mrs Hunter was sent home with Private Hunter, who was allowed to go home for a few days to spend some time with his mother.[2]

Photo of William Emerton Hunters 2 brothers killed at Gallipoli (Sydney Morning Herald 1/11/1915)

Photo of William Emerton Hunter’s 2 brothers killed at Gallipoli (Sydney Morning Herald 1/11/1915)

This photograph of Private Hunter’s two brothers Frederick and Maurice Hunter was published in The Sydney Morning Herald on 1st November 1915 with the caption “Brothers Hunter of Redfern both killed in action at Gallipoli … a third brother is one of the Gilgandra recruits now marching to Sydney”.[3]

Private Hunter was to hear from his mother again on the march. The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate reported that at the recruiting meeting held for the Coo-ees in the Park at Parramatta on 10th November 1915: ‘A lady here stepped on to the platform and said her name was Mrs. Annie [sic] Hunter, and that she lived at Young Street, Redfern. Two of her sons had been killed at Gallipoli on August 27, and her third son was now with Captain Hitchen’s men. “I only had three boys,” she said, “and two have been killed; the third one is with the ‘Coo-ees,’ and I wish that I had another one to give in the cause of the Empire.”[4]

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Hunter went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On Private Hunter’s embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 50th Young Street, Redfern, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as sister, Miss A. Hunter, 50th Young Street, Redfern, N.S.W. (On his attestation paper in his service record his next of kin is listed as mother, Mrs F.[Fanny] Hunter, 50A Young Street, Redfern, N.S.W, which is crossed out and changed to sister, Miss Annie Hunter, 50A Young Street, Redfern, N.S.W. His sister Annie Hunter’s name is also mentioned in other documents in his service record).

On 8th March 1916 Private Hunter along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916. On the 19th April 1916 Private Hunter was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Hunter left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 8th June 1916.

Private Hunter served with the 45th Battalion during its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916. Private Hunter then moved with the 45th Battalion to Pozieres, France, in early August 1916. Private Hunter was killed in action in the vicinity of Pozieres, France, on 7th August 1916. He had initially been reported wounded in the field on 7/8th August 1916, then was posted as wounded & missing. Following a court of enquiry on 26th April 1917 he was officially reported killed in action on 7th August 1916. Private Hunter has no known grave.

Private Hunter is remembered on the Australian National Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux in France.

Private Hunter's name on the Villers-Brettoneux Memorial (Photograph: S. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Hunter’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial (Photograph: S. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Hunter’s name is commemorated on panel 139 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

His name is also listed on the Redfern War Memorial (along with the names of his two brothers).

Note: Having already lost 2 sons to the war, after her son William was posted wounded and missing in 1916,  Mrs F. Hunter moved to a war widows’ home later that year in The Boulevarde, Sans Souci, which had been built for her by the Kogarah branch of the Voluntary Workers’ Association, and named “Coo-ee” in memory of the third son who had ‘marched with Hitchen’s Coo-ees’.[5]

[1]‘A tragedy of the War’, Leader, 25 October 1915, p. 1., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842543

[2] ‘Mr Arkins and the “Coo-ees.”, Molong Argus, 29 October 1915, p. 7, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article105660877

[3] ‘Heroes of the Dardanelles’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 1 November 1915, p. 5., http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15622222

[4] ‘The great recruiting meeting in the park’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 13 November 1915, p. 11, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86101772

[5] ‘War homes’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 25 September 1916, p. 5, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15684629 ; ‘War widows’ homes’, Sunday Times, 24 September 1916, p. 6, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article121344784