Monthly Archives: July 2017

Charles CREASE

Charles CREASE

Private Charles Crease (Sunday Times 8/10/1916)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4754), Charles Crease was born at Camperdown, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 38 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 146 lbs., with a ruddy complexion, brown eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed to have no previous military service.

He was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway when the Coo-ees were at Lawson on 7th November 1915.  He completed his medical examination at Lawson on 8th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Kiyare, Simmonds Street, Enmore, N.S.W.[2]  His next of kin was listed as his sister, Mrs J. Lathan, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Crease, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 Private Crease was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Crease left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He disembarked at Marseilles on 9th June 1916.

Private Crease served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then as it moved to Pozieres in early August 1916.

On 12th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was in reserve trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, when Private Crease was wounded in action, receiving a shrapnel wound to his left hand.[3]  He was evacuated to the 44th Casualty Clearing Station.  On 13th August 1916 he was sent to the 24th General Hospital at Etaples, France.

On 6th September 1916 Private Crease was discharged from hospital, and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot.

On 17th October 1916 Private Crease rejoined the 13th Battalion when it was conducting training and supplying fatigue parties at Murrumbidgee Camp at La Clyette, Belgium.[4]

On 9th May 1917 the 13th Battalion was conducting training at Bresle, France, when Private Crease was admitted to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station suffering Neuritis.  He rejoined the Battalion on 15th May 1917.

On 29th September 1917 the 13th Battalion was near Zonnebeke, Belgium, when Private Crease was wounded in action, receiving shrapnel wounds to his arm, legs and chest.[5] He was evacuated to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance, then on to the 10th Casualty Clearing Station.

On 5th October 1917 Private Crease was moved back to the 1st Canadian General Hospital at Etaples, France.

On 16th October 1917 Private Crease was evacuated to England on the Hospital Ship Newhaven, where he was admitted to the 1st Western General Hospital at Liverpool, England.

Private Crease was discharged from hospital on 12th December 1917, and granted leave till 26th December 1917, when he reported to the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 27th December 1917 Private Crease was admitted to the camp hospital sick [VD Venereal Disease]. He was discharged on 3rd January 1918.

On 14th February 1918 Private Crease was transferred to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

Private Crease left England on 12th March 1918 for return to Australia aboard the S.S. Kenilworth Castle. The ship arrived at Cape Town, South Africa on 28th March 1918. On 28th April 1918 Private Crease departed Cape Town aboard the H.T. Field Marshall.

He arrived in Australian on 22nd May 1918 (gunshot wound right groin and abdomen).

He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 23rd June 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, CREASE C

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Charles Crease, HMAT Star of England A15, 8 March 1916.

[3] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/6 – August 1916.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/8 – October 1916.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/19 – September 1917.

Ernest TATTERSALL

Ernest TATTERSALL

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4904), Ernest Tattersall was born at Parkes, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 31 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 154 lbs., with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

A letter from his sister in his service record states that ‘He enlisted at Wellington with the Coo-ees’. [2] He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915. He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Mumbil on 19th October 1915.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 3rd February 1916 Private Tattersall was charged with being absent without leave from Liverpool Camp. He was fined 10 shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Piesley Street, Orange, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his sister Mrs. F. Phillips, at the same address.[3]

On 8th March 1916 Private Tattersall departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On the 16th of April 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On 4th June 1916 Private Tattersall left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Tattersall served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France until 14th October 1916, when he was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from an ulcer to the left leg. He was moved back to the 10th Casualty Clearing Station. On 15th October 1916 he was placed aboard the 23rd Ambulance Train for evacuation to the 25th General Hospital at Hardelot, France, where he was admitted on 16th October 1916.

On 20th October 1916 Private Tattersall was placed aboard the Hospital Ship St David at Boulogne for evacuation to England. On 21st October 1916 he was admitted to the Tonbridge General Hospital.

He was discharged from hospital on 23rd November 1916 for leave until 8th December 1916.  He marched in to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England, on 9th December 1916.

On 12th January 1917 Private Tattersall went before a Medical Board where he was classified as C2 [unfit for overseas temporarily unfit for home service].

On 10th April 1917 Private Tattersall was transferred to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.  A document in his service record dated 10th April 1917 at Weymouth noted ‘Old injury L. leg. Leg swells after marching’.

On 17th April 1917 Private Tattersall was detached for duty with the Ordinance Depot at Bhurtpore Barracks, Tidworth.

On 22nd July 1917 Private Tattersall left England on the H.T. Nestor bound for Australia.

He arrived at Sydney on 25th September 1917, and was discharged Medically Unfit on 24th October 1917, with a compound fracture to the left leg [pre-existing injury from 10 years before].

Note: Ernest Tattersall died from Pneumonic Influenza in Sydney on 14th March 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, TATTERSALL ERNEST

[2] NAA: B2455, TATTERSALL ERNEST, letter from Mrs F. Phillips to Officer in Charge, Base Records Office, Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria, 24th August 1916.

[3] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Ernest Tattersall, HMAT Star of England A15, 8 March 1916.

 

Herbert William SPICER

Herbert William SPICER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4897), ‘William Herbert Spicer’ was born at Wimmin, Victoria.[1]  (He signed his name Herbert William Spicer on his Attestation Paper, and other official records record his name as Herbert William Spicer, so it appears  his first and middle name may have not have been recorded in the correct order  on his service record). [2] He gave his age as 21 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farm labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 9 stone 6 lbs., with a fair complexion, gray eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his Certificate of Medical Examination at Gilgandra on 12th October 1915, two days after the commencement of the Coo-ee March.  It is not clear exactly where he caught up with the Coo-ees, but he had joined them by the time they arrived at Wellington, as his Certificate of Medical Examination was co-signed at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at that town).  He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 20th October 1915.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On the 31st of January 1916 Private Spicer was charged with being absent from parade. He was fined 5 shillings.

The Dimboola Banner and Wimmera and Mallee Advertiser reported on 31st March 1916 that ‘Private Herbert Spencer, youngest son of Mr F. W. Spicer, of Lochiel, who enlisted at Gilgandra, N.S.W., was one of the famous “Coo-ees,” who marched 320 miles to Sydney’.[3]  This information was provided to this newspaper by his brother-in-law, Mr. A. A. Fechner, formerly of Dimboola, who had moved to Gilgandra with his wife Lily (Herbert’s sister) about 1911.[4]

‘H. Spicer’ was presented with a watch and a wallet at a send-off held for the Gilgandra Coo-ees at the Australian Hall in Gilgandra on Friday 3rd March 1916.[5]

His name was recorded as ‘Herbert Spicer’ on his embarkation roll, and his address at time of enrolment was ‘Gilgandra’.  His next of kin was listed as his father, F. [Frederick William] Spicer, Dimboola, Victoria.

On 8th March 1916 Private Spicer departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company (along with fellow Coo-ees Private Richardson and Private Megarrity).

On 17th June 1916 Private Spicer left Alexandria aboard the Transport Manitou bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 25th June 1916.

On 8th July 1916 Private Spicer was attached to the 2nd ANZAC Headquarters as escort to the G.O.C. [General Officer Commanding] in France.  He was detached to join the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 28th September 1916.

On 10th October 1916 Private Spicer commenced a training course at the Signals School. He returned to his unit on 27th December 1916.

On 3rd February 1917 Private Spicer was charged with conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline, in that he did upon being issued with his rum contrary to regulations, hand it to another soldier. He was awarded 3 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 26th March 1917 Private Spicer was detached for duty with the 2nd ANZAC Corps Anti-Aircraft Section.

He returned to his unit from this detachment on 19th of May 1917.

On 21st May 1917 he was detached for duty with the A.P.M. [Assistant Provost Marshal] 2nd ANZAC Corps.  He rejoined his unit on 5th June 1917.

On 23rd July 1917 he was sent to the Power Buzzer School. He returned to his unit on 1st August 1917.

On 4th August 1917 Private Spicer went on leave.  He returned from leave on 16th August 1917.

On 10th September 1917 the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion commenced work burying cable in the vicinity of La Clytte, Belgium, when the working parties came under attack by gas shelling.[6] Private Spicer was one of 43 men in his unit evacuated the next day with mustard gas poisoning. He was taken first to the 103rd Field Ambulance, then to the 9th Casualty Clearing Station, and the 11th Casualty Clearing Station.

On 12th September 1917 Private Spicer was placed aboard the 21st Ambulance Train for evacuation to the 53rd General Hospital at Boulogne, France.

On 23rd September 1917 he was transferred to the 1st Convalescent Depot at Boulogne. On 25th September 1917 he was transferred to the 10th Convalescent Depot.

On 18th November  1917 Private Spicer marched into the Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He rejoined his Battalion on 25th November 1917.

On 30th November 1917 Private Spicer was sent to the 43rd Field Ambulance, then back to the 10th Casualty Clearing Station sick. On 1st December 1917 he was placed aboard the 5th Ambulance Train.  He arrived at the 9th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France, on 2nd December 1917. On 4th December 1917 he was transferred to the 29th General Hospital at Boulogne.

He was discharged to Base Depot on 2nd February 1918. He rejoined his Battalion on 7th February 1918.

On 25th March 1918 Private Spicer was detached for duty with the 1st Australian Division Signals Company.

On 13th September 1918 Private Spicer went on leave to England.  He returned from leave on 29th September 1918.

On 24th January 1919 Private Spicer was officially transferred to the 1st Australian Division Signals Company.

On 4th June 1919 Private Spicer departed France to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at No. 1 Group at Longbridge, England, on 5th June 1919.

On 4th July 1919 Private Spicer departed England aboard the H.T. Norman bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 20th August 1919, and was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 12th October 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, SPICER HERBERT WILLIAM

[2] Herbert William Spicer, Victorian Birth Registration, 1896, Reg. no. 22234.

[3] ‘News and Notes’, Dimboola Banner and Wimmera and Mallee Advertiser,  31 March 1916, p. 2. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article152834929

[4] ‘Obituary’, Gilgandra Weekly and Castlereagh, 18 June 1936, p. 4. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113030512

[5] ‘Our Soldiers’ Column’, Gilgandra Weekly, 10 March 1916, p. 14. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119923509

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 12/2 – 2nd ANZAC Corps Cyclist Battalion, AWM4 12/2/15 – September 1917.

Frank BLACK

Frank BLACK

Per his initial military service record (Depot), Frank Black was born at Cumberland, England.[1]  He gave his age as 42 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as laborer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 2 inches tall, weight 130 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and light brown hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.   He claimed that he had no previous military service. His postal address on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form was ‘Grafton’.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 28th October 1915, then travelled to Bathurst to join the Coo-ees that same day. He was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Bathurst on 28th October 1915.

Frank Black was named in The Bathurst Times as one of four recruits who came forward to join the Coo-ees at the recruiting meeting held at Machattie Park in Bathurst on the evening of 28th October 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 30th December 1915 Private Black was charged with being absent from Parade on 29th and 30th December 1915. He was fined 10 shillings.

On 23rd January 1916 Private Black was charged with being absent without leave from 21st to 23rd January 1916. He was fined 15 shillings.

On 28th January 1916 Private Black was charged with being absent without leave on 27th and 28th January 1916, when he was arrested by the civil police for being drunk in Sydney. He was fined 15 shillings.

On 6th February 1916 Private Black was charged with being absent without leave from 1st to 6th February 1916. He was recommended to be discharged.

On 10th February 1916 Private Black was discharged from the A.I.F. with his services no longer required.

Sixteen months later, Frank Black reenlisted in the A.I.F. on 20th June 1917 at Toowoomba, Queensland.  He made no mention of his previous service on his enlistment papers.

On his embarkation roll Private Black’s address at time of enrolment was G.P.O. Clifton, Queensland,  and his next of kin is listed as his brother, James Black, 43 Queen’s Street, Cleatormore, Cumberland, England.

Issued with Regimental no. 3747, Private Black departed Sydney on the HMAT Miltiades A28 on 2nd August 1917, with the 10th reinforcements for the 47th Battalion.

He disembarked at Glasgow, Scotland, on 2nd October 1917.

On 3rd October 1917 he marched into the 12th Training Battalion at Codford, England.

On 27th December 1917 he departed Southampton, England, bound for France to reinforce the 42nd Battalion.

He marched into the Australian General Base Depot at Rouelles, France on 28th December 1917.

On 31st December 1917 Private Black was charged with being absent without leave from 0900 on 29th December 1917 till 0700 on 30th December 1917.  He was also charged with being absent without leave from 0800 on 30th December 1917 till 0700 on 31st December 1917. He was fined 4 days pay.

On 5th January 1918 Private Black was taken on strength of the 42nd Battalion when it was training at Locre, France.

On 20th January 1918 Private Black was sent to the 11th Australian Field Ambulance sick with debility, and he was transferred to the 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing station.

On 23rd January 1918 he was transferred to the 5th General Hospital in Rouen, Franc.

On 10th February 1918 he was transferred to the 6th Convalescent Depot at Etaples, France.

On 12th February 1918 he was transferred to the Australian General Base Depot at Rouelles, France, arriving on 16th February 1918.

On5th March 1918 Private Black departed Le Harve, France, bound for England.  He arrived at Weymouth on 6th  March 1918, and marched into the No. 2 Command Depot.

On 15th April 1918 Private Black departed England aboard the H.T. Marathon.

He arrived in Australia on 12th June 1918, and was discharged medically unfit with chronic rheumatism on 14th July 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, BLACK F

[2] ‘In the Park’, The Bathurst Times, 29 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved June 15, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111246741

 

TIMELINE July 1917

TIMELINE July 1917

Tuesday, 3 July 1917

Private Sidney Stanley CANNON  (4th Pioneer Battalion) was placed aboard the 8th Ambulance Train and sent to the 13th General Hospital at Boulogne, France,  where he was admitted with a gunshot wound to his right temple [wounded  6th June 1917 at Messines, Belgium].

Private Sidney Stanley Cannon (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 7/7/1917)

Thursday, 5 July 1917

Private Walter James GOODLET (4th Pioneer Battalion) arrived in Sydney aboard the H.T. Themistocles for medical discharge [amputated arm].

Coo-ees Walter Goodlet (left) and James Birrell Dawson (right), both amputees. Photograph courtesy of James Dawson’s great grandson Jamie Stacey.

Private James Birrell DAWSON  (54th Battalion) arrived in Sydney aboard the transport H.T. Themistocles for medical discharge [amputated arm].

Private James MCKEOWN  (45th Battalion) arrived in Australia  aboard the  H.T. Themistocles for medical discharge.

Private Louis Henry ATTENBOROUGH  (4th Pioneer Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the H.T. Themistocles for medical discharge [suffering for deafness senility and rheumatism and being over age].

H.M.A.T. Themistocles A32 en route to Australia with wounded Australian soldiers (Photograph from the Australian War Memorial Collection J02941)

Private Thomas William HASKETT (45th Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the H.T. Miltiades for medical discharge [chronic nephritis]

Friday, 6 July 1917

Private Robert Michael HICKEY (13th Battalion) was discharged medically unfit.

Private Ernest Stephen TAYLOUR  (45th Battalion) arrived in Australia aboard the H.T. Runic for medical discharge [shell shock].

 

Tuesday, 10 July 1917

Private Joseph William EDWARDS (3rd Battalion) was accidentally wounded in France with a bomb wound to his back and left hand.

Friday, 13 July 1917

Private Sidney Stanley CANNON  (4th Pioneer Battalion) was sent by Hospital Ship to England.

Corporal Francis Charles Edward CLARKE (4th Pioneer Battalion) was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from disordered action of heart in Belgium.

Saturday, 14 July 1917

Private Sidney Stanley CANNON  (4th Pioneer Battalion) was admitted to the Fulham Military Hospital in England.

Sunday, 15 July 1917

Private Darcy KEATING  (4th Battalion) was promoted to Lance Corporal.

Lance Corporal Lewis Reginald DUFF (45th Battalion) was promoted to Corporal.

Monday, 16 July 1917

Second Lieutenant Harry DAVENPORT (aka Harry SWENDSON)  (4th Battalion) was promoted to Lieutenant in England.

Friday, 20 July 1917

Private Alan John Burnett EASTERBROOK  (13th Battalion) arrived in Sydney aboard the transport Wiltshire for medical discharge.

Corporal Francis Charles Edward CLARKE (4th Pioneer Battalion) was transferred to the 2nd Casualty Clearing station.

Private Charles Robert RICHARDSON  (2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion) arrived in Sydney aboard the H.M.A.T. Ayrshire for medical discharge [gun shot wounds].

Saturday, 21 July 1917

Private Joseph Francis HEALEY  (13th Battalion) departed England aboard the H.M.A.T. Euripides for return to Australia [GSW left knee].

Corporal Francis Charles Edward CLARKE (4th Pioneer Battalion) was placed on the 27th Ambulance Train to be taken to Rouen, France.

Sunday, 22 July 1917

Private George SEAMAN (45th Battalion) left England aboard the Transport Nestor bound for Australia for medical discharge [debility after shell shock].

Corporal Francis Charles Edward CLARKE (4th Pioneer Battalion) was admitted to the 5th General Hospital at Rouen.

Monday, 23 July 1917

Corporal Francis Charles Edward CLARKE (4th Pioneer Battalion) was transferred to the 2nd Convalescent Depot at Rouen.

Friday, 27 July 1917

Private Thomas Henry TURVEY MM (45th Battalion) commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Demosthenes [GSW abdomen received at Messines Ridge in June 1917].

Private T. H. Turvey, of Gilgandra “Coo-ees”, awarded Military Medal (Newspaper unknown, 1917)

Private Harold Roy Devlin UHR re-enlisted in the AIF in Sydney, and was allocated to the 17th Battalion.

Saturday, 28 July 1917

Private Joseph William EDWARDS (3rd Battalion) was placed aboard the hospital ship Warilda for evacuation to England.

Sunday, 29 July 1917

Private Joseph William EDWARDS (3rd Battalion) was admitted to the 3rd Southern General Hospital at Oxford, England [bomb wound back severe].

Tuesday, 31 July 1917

Private James MCKEOWN (45th Battalion) was discharged medically unfit [cardiac insufficiency].