Tag Archives: Dubbo recruits

Andrew George LENNOX

Andrew George LENNOX

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4824),  Andrew George Lennox was born at Bourke, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 19 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as railway porter.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 185 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and medium brown hair.  His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

A send-off was held on Thursday 28th October 1915 at the Court House Hotel in Cobar for Andrew Lennox, Norman Francisco, and brothers Walter and Robert Mitchell, and they were then cheered by many friends when they left Cobar by train on Saturday 30th October 1915 to join the A.I.F.[2]

All four of them completed their medical examinations, and were attested, at Dubbo on Monday 2nd November 1915, (the day the Coo-ees were at Lithgow).

Andrew Lennox then traveled by train with these three other Cobar men to catch up with the Coo-ees.  They were waiting to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees arrived at Mt. Victoria three days later, on Thursday 4th November 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Lennox went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Private Lennox and fellow Coo-ee Private Francisco while home on leave were given a farewell at the Star Hotel in Cobar on Saturday, 1st January 1916.[4]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Marshall Street, Cobar, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his father, A. Lennox, at the same address.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Lennox, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel El Kebir, Egypt.

On 4th June 1916 Private Lennox left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

He served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France and Belgium.

On 1st September 1918 Private Lennox went on leave to England.

He returned to the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 17th September 1918, and was transferred to the 4th Machine Gun Battalion in France.

On 16th November 1918 Private Lennox was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance sick. He was moved back to the 50th Casualty Clearing Station on 17th November 1918.

On 22nd November 1918 he was placed aboard the 2nd Ambulance Train and moved to the 2nd Convalescent Depot, arriving on 23rd November 1918. On 24th November 1918 he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital at Le Harve, France, where he was admitted on 25th November 1918.

On 26th December 1918 Private Lennox was placed aboard a Hospital Ship for evacuation to England.  He was admitted to the Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England, on 27th December 1918.

On 10th May 1919 he was discharged from hospital, and sent to the Convalescent Training Depot at Parkhouse, England.

On 12th May 1919 Private Lennox was sent back to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford sick.

He was discharged from hospital on 21st July 1919, and sent to the No. 2 Group at Sutton Veny, England.

On 22nd August 1919 Private Lennox left England on the H.T.t Anchises bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 13th October 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 5th December 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, LENNOX ANDREW GEORGE

[2] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 30 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136723099

[3] Summary’, Western Age, 6 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136724708

[4] Valedictory. (1916, January 4). Western Age (Dubbo, NSW : 1914 – 1932), p. 2. Retrieved February 18, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136725949

[5] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Andrew George Lennox, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

Norman Hamond FRANCISCO

Norman Hamond FRANCISCO

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4775),  Norman Hamond Francisco was born at Cobar, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 24 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as baker.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 1 ½ inches tall, weight 162 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and light brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

A send-off was held on Thursday 28th October 1915 at the Court House Hotel in Cobar for Norman Francisco, brothers Walter and Robert Mitchell, and Andrew Lennox, and they were then cheered by many friends when they left Cobar by train on Saturday 30th October 1915 to join the A.I.F.[2]

All four of them completed their medical examinations, and were attested, at Dubbo on Monday 2nd November 1915, (the day the Coo-ees were at Lithgow).

Norman Francisco then traveled by train with these three other Cobar men to catch up with the Coo-ees.  They were waiting to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees arrived at Mt. Victoria three days later, on Thursday 4th November 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Francisco went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 20th December 1915 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp from 3rd to 19th December 1915. He was fined 17 days pay.

Private Francisco and fellow Coo-ee Private Lennox while home on leave were given a farewell at the Star Hotel in Cobar on Saturday, 1st January 1916.[4]

On 4th February 1916 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp on 1st February 1916. He was fined 1 days pay.

On 16th February 1916 he was charged with being absent from night piquet. He was fined 2 days pay.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Becker Street, Cobar, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his father, A. [Alfred] Francisco, at the same address.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Francisco, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On the 16th of April 1916 he transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel El Kebir, Egypt.

On the 4th of June 1916 Private Francisco left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived  at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 31st October 1916 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from 0830 on 29th October 1916 till 0900 on 29th October 1916. He was fined 4 days pay.

On 5th November 1916 Private Francisco was injured playing in a football match. He was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance. On 7th November 1916 he was admitted to the 1st New Zealand Stationary Hospital at Amiens, France, with a sprained ankle. On 9th November 1916 he was placed aboard the 9th Ambulance Train and sent to the 11th Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France, where he was admitted on 10th November 1916 with a fracture to the 5th metarasal bone in his right foot.

On 12th November 1916 Private Francisco was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Formosa bound for England. He was admitted to the 1st Southern General Hospital at Birmingham, England, on 13th November 1916, with a fractured toe.

Private Francisco was discharged from hospital on 19th February 1917, and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England on 6th March 1917.

On 24th March 1917 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from 3.30 pm on 6th March 1917 till 8.45 am on 23rd March 1917. He was awarded 10 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 28 days pay.

On 21st June 1917 Private Francisco was charged with neglecting to obey routine orders by being in Tidworth after hours on 19th June 1917 without a pass, using obscene language, and drunkenness. He was awarded 14 days detention.

On 21st August 1917 Private Francisco marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 23rd September 1917 he was appointed Acting Lance Corporal at Fovant, England, while attending school.

On 20th October 1917 Private Francisco was sent to the Sutton Veny Military Hospital sick with Influenza.  He revered to the rank of Private on being admitted to hospital.  He was discharged on 30th October 1917.

On 22nd February 1918 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 19th February 1918 till apprehended by the Military Police at 1815 on 20th February 1918. He was awarded 1 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 3 days pay.

On 7th April 1918 Private Francisco departed Southampton, England, bound for France.  He marched into the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Havre on 8th April 1918.

On 19th April 1918 he rejoined the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France.

On 22nd May 1918 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was resting  in billets around the village of Bussy, France, when it was bombed by enemy aircraft.[6]  One man was killed and 6 were wounded. Private Francisco was one of those wounded, receiving a bomb wound to his right leg. He was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance. On 23rd May 1918 he was moved back to the 5th Casualty Clearing Station. On 27th May 1918 he was placed aboard the 10th Ambulance Train, being admitted to the 47th General Hospital later that day. He was discharged on 5th June 1918, and sent to the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

He rejoined the 4th Pioneer Battalion on the 19th of June 1918.

On 13th March 1919 Private Francisco departed France bound for England to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at Weymouth, England, on 14th March 1919 and marched into the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 1st May 1919 Private Francisco commenced his return to Australia aboard the Transport China.

He arrived in Australia on 11th June 1919.

Private Francisco was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 26th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, FRANCISCO N H

[2] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 30 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136723099

[3] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 6 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136724708

[4] Valedictory. (1916, January 4). Western Age (Dubbo, NSW : 1914 – 1932), p. 2. Retrieved February 18, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136725949

[5] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Norman Hammond [sic] Francisco, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 14/16 – 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, May 1918.

John Thomas PARKER

John Thomas PARKER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4867), John Thomas Parker was born at Warren,  N.S.W. [1] He gave his age as 28 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as grocer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 10 ½ inches tall, weight 144 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military experience.

He completed his medical examination on 21st October 1915 at Dubbo, and was attested at Dubbo on 21st October 1915 (along with William Henry Nicholls, who was also from Coonamble).

The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate reported that ‘Mr. Jack Parker, a Coonambleite, caught up to and joined the “Coo-ees” at Molong’.[2] He and William Henry Nicholls were the ‘two men from Coonamble’ reported in The Gilgandra Weekly to have caught up with the Coo-ees when they were at Molong on 22nd October 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 22nd November 1915 at the Liverpool Camp he was charged with being absent without leave. He was fined 1 days pay.

On 7th February 1916 he was charged with being absent from special piquet. He was fined 5 shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Namoi Street, Coonamble, N.S.W. His next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs M. [Marion] Parker, at the same address.[4]

On 8th March 1916 Private Parker, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

On 16th April 1916 Private Simpson was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 4th June 1916 Private Parker left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 18th August 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was resting and training after just coming out of conducting works around Pozieres, France, when Private Parker was charged with being absent from 1400 Parade.[5] He was awarded 8 hours Field Punishment no. 1 and fined 1 days pay.

On 19th October 1916 Private Parker was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance sick with conjunctivitis. He was admitted to the 24th General Hospital at Etaples on 24th of October 1916.

On 28th October 1916 he was discharged to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 8th of December 1916 Private Parker was charged with drunkenness and being in possession of spirits on the 6th of December 1916. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 1.

On 12th December 1916 Private Parker re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion whilst it was conducting works and tramway maintenance in the vicinity of Longueval, France.[6]

On 15th June 1917 Private Parker was charged with being absent without leave from 2100 on 6th June 1917 till surrendering himself to the Military Police at 2115 on 8th June 1917. He was awarded 28 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 37 days pay.

On 25th July 1917 a Field General Courts Martial was held where Private Parker was charged with whilst being on active service absenting himself without leave from  2100 on 12th July till apprehended by R.S.M. Middleton at 2030 on 13th July 1917. He was found guilty, and sentenced to 6 month imprisonment with hard labour. On 2nd August 1916 the sentence was commuted to 90 days Field Punishment No. 1 and fined 103 days pay.

On 17th August 1917 Private Parker was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance sick. He was transferred to the 39th General Hospital  at Le Harve, France.  He was discharged from hospital on 1st September 1917, and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 29th October 1917 Private Parker was charged with being in Le Harve town without a pass and being out of bounds on 27th October 1917. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 14 days pay.

Private Parker re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 26th November 1917.

On 28th February 1918 Private Parker was sent to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance with Pyrexia. He was transferred to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station. On 3rd March 1918 he was moved to the 2nd Casualty Clearing Station. On 6th March 1918 he was placed aboard the 19th Ambulance Train and admitted to the 55th General Hospital at Boulogne suffering trench fever.

On 13th March 1918 Private Parker was placed aboard the H.S. Cambria and transferred to England, where he was admitted to the Tankerton Military Hospital at Whitstable, England, later that day.

On 5th April 1918 Private Parker was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

On 3rd May 1918 he was discharged from hospital, and sent to the No.3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 23rd June 1918 Private Parker was admitted to the Brigade Hospital at Hurdcott suffering from Influenza. He was discharged on 1st July 1918.

On 6th July 1918 Private Parker was transferred to the No.1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

On 14th October 1918 Private Parker marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 6th November 1918 he departed Southampton bound for France. He arrived on 7th November 1918, and re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France on 11th November 1918.

On 10th February 1919 Private Parker departed Le Harve, France, bound for England. He arrived at Weymouth on 11th February 1919.

On 13th April 1919 Private Parker departed England aboard the Transport Commonwealth bound for Australia.  During this voyage he was admitted to the ship’s hospital with scabies in 25th April 1919. He was discharged on 7th May 1919.

Private Parker arrived in Australia on 12th June 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 20th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, PARKER JOHN THOMAS

[2] ‘Our soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 2 November 1915, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601759

[3] ‘With the “Coo-ees.” From town to town’, Gilgandra Weekly , 20 October 1915, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119923919

[4] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, John Thomas Parker, 4867.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 14/16 – 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, August 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 14/16 – 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, December 1916.

Walter James WATTS

Walter James WATTS

Per his military service record (Depot), Walter James Watts was born at Hay, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 38 years, his marital status as married, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 10 stone, with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was recorded as being Anglican.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as Mrs E. M. Watts, C/o J. Dumbrell, Walla Walla N.S.W.

He completed his medical examination at Gilgandra on 14th October 1915 (4 days after the Coo-ees left Gilgandra).  He travelled to Dubbo Army Camp – the nearest place he could enlist, and was attested at Dubbo on 17th October 1915.

The Gilgandra Weekly reported on 3rd December 1915 that prior to enlisting Watts had been ‘employed by Mr Utley, a district sawmiller’, and that ‘he left Gilgandra for the Dubbo Depot Camp, where he enlisted on October 16. The next day he entrained to Wellington and joined the Coo-ees’.[2]

The Coo-ees had a rest day in Wellington on 17th October 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 17th November 1915 Private Watts of the “Coo-ees” went before a Medical Board at Liverpool Camp, where he was found to be unfit for active service due to varicose veins.

Private Watts was discharged medically unfit on 29th November 1915.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WATTS WALTER JAMES

[2] ‘An aftermath’, Gilgandra Weekly, 3 December 1915, p. 10. Retrieved August 11, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119922362

 

Walter James MITCHELL

Walter James MITCHELL

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4842),  Walter James Mitchell was born at Cobar, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 37 years and 5 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as Contractor.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 147 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and light brown hair.  His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

A send-off was held on Thursday 28th October 1915 at the Court House Hotel in Cobar for Walter and his brother Robert Mitchell, Norman Franciso, and Andrew Lennox, and they were then cheered by many friends when they left Cobar by train on 30th October 1915 to join the A.I.F.[2]

Walter Mitchell completed his medical examination, and was attested, at Dubbo on 2nd November 1915, (the day the Coo-ees were at Lithgow).

Walter and his brother Robert Mitchell, Andrew Lennox, and Norman Francisco then travelled to catch up with the Coo-ees, and  were waiting to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees arrived at Mt. Victoria two days later, on 4th November 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Cobar, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his wife, Mrs H. G. [Henrietta] Mitchell, C/o W. Mitchell, Cobar, N.S.W.  His rank was listed as Acting Corporal.[4]

A farewell was held at the Masonic Hall in Cobar at the Masonic Hall on Friday 3rd March 1916 to bid farewell to Corporal Walter Mitchell, and his brother Private Bob Mitchell, and Private Fred Duncan. The Western Age reported that  ‘Corporal Walter Mitchell, on rising to respond on behalf of himself and his comrades, was loudly cheered’, and in a ‘very affected speech he said words failed to thank to people of Cobar for all the kind remarks and their nice presents’, and that they would ‘cherish them wherever it was their lot to be sent’, and that it was a ‘great wrench for him to go, but he realised duty had to be done, and he was going to do his little bit’.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Acting Corporal Mitchell, along with his brother, and many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Tel-el-Kebir, and taken on strength of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade, with the rank of Gunner.

On 22nd May 1916 Gunner Mitchell was transferred to the 37th Battery.

On 5th June 1916 Gunner Mitchell left Alexandria aboard the HMT Oriana bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 13th June 1916.

On 24th October 1916 Gunner Mitchell was taken on the strength of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.

On 25th October 1916 Gunner Mitchell was appointed as a Temporary Bombardier.

On 9th March 1917 Temporary Bombardier Mitchell was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance sick. On 12th March 1917 he was moved back to a Casualty Clearing Station, and reverted to the rank of Gunner.

On 19th April 1917 he was placed aboard the 20th Ambulance Train, and evacuated to the 14th Stationary Hospital at Boulogne, France.

On 22nd April 1917 Gunner Mitchell was placed aboard Hospital Ship Jan Breydel for evacuation to England, with meningitis.

On 23rd April he was admitted to the Addington Park War Hospital outside London, England.

On 18th May 1917 Gunner Mitchell was transferred to the Royal Herbert Hospital at Woolwich, England.

On 8th August 1917 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield Park, England.

Gunner Mitchell was discharged on the 18th of August 1917, and sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 27th September 1917 Gunner Mitchell departed England aboard the H.T.  Suevic bound for Australia, for medical discharge with Myalgia debility after C. S. Fever.

He arrived in Australia on 20th November 1917.

Private Mitchell was welcomed home and presented with a silver cup by the people of Cobar, and the Red Cross Association, at the Masonic Hall in Cobar on 5th December 1917.[6]

Private Mitchell was discharged medically unfit on 31st January 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, MITCHELL WALTER JAMES

[2] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 30 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136723099

[3] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 6 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136724708

[4] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Walter James Mitchell, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[5] ‘Cobar’s Farewell’, Western Age (Dubbo, NSW : 1914 – 1932), 10 March 1916, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136721446

[6] ‘Cobar Soldiers’ Red Cross Association’,Western Age, 7 December 1917, p. 3. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136909226

 

Thomas William EVANS

Thomas William EVANS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4770), Thomas William Evans was born at Castlemaine, Victoria.[1]  He gave his age as 38 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as Labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 6inches tall, weight 149 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and light brown hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  He completed his medical examination at Dubbo on 12th October 1915, and was attested at Dubbo on 14th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees left Dubbo for Wongarbon).  He claimed to have had no previous military service.

His brother, Mr. J. Evans, later reported in the Mount Alexander Mail that he had ‘been engaged in farming’ in New South Wales for about three years before he enlisted, and that ‘he was one of those who made up the famous Gilgandra snowball’.[2]  A letter in his service record from a Mrs. S. H. Dunford, from a property near Parkes, enquiring as to his whereabouts after the war, stated that he had ‘enlisted with the Gilgandra Coo-ees’.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Parker Street, Castlemaine, Victoria, and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs I. [Isabella] Evans, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Evans, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, as 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

He was transferred to the 45th Battalion on 19th April 1916.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Evans left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle, bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Evans served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916, then as it moved to Pozieres in early August 1916.

On 14th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was in the front line trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich in France.  During this day 45th Battalion had casualties of 15 men wounded from artillery shelling.  Private Evans was one of the wounded.  He was evacuated to the 4th Field ambulance, then 44th Casualty Clearing Station, with a shrapnel wound to his back.  He was put on the Ambulance Train, and admitted to the 5th General Hospital at Rouen on 16th August 1916.

On 23rd August 1916 he was discharged, and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

He rejoined the 45th Battalion on 16th of September 1916 when it was conducting training at Victoria Camp near Rhenninghelst, Belgium.

On 19th November 1916 the 45th Battalion was moving into the front line at Grease Trench, just north of Gueducourt, France, when Private Evans was evacuated to the 38th Casualty Clearing Station sick with Influenza.

On 21st November 1916 he was placed aboard the 20th Ambulance Train, and conveyed to the 12th General Hospital at Rouen, France, where he was admitted on 22nd November 1916.

Private Evans was discharged from hospital on 2nd December 1916 and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France

Private Evans rejoined the 45th Battalion on 5th January 1917 when it was at Dernacourt, France, preparing to move to the front line.

On 20th February 1917 the 45th Battalion was in action near Guedecourt, France, when Private Evans was wounded in action for a second time, receiving a serious shrapnel wound to his right forehead that fractured his skull.  He was evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station, then on 25st February 1917 placed aboard the 21st Ambulance Train.  He was conveyed to the 11th Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France , where he was admitted on 26th February 1917, suffering from gunshot wound head penetrating cranium, severe.

On 19th April 1917 Private Evans was evacuated to England by Hospital Ship.  He was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth.

On 21st July 1917 Private Evans was evacuated to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 25th July 1917 Private Evans was discharged from hospital, and granted leave to report to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

Private Evans left England on 27th August 1917 for return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Pakeha, arriving in Australia on 25th October 1917.

He was discharged medically unfit on 22nd November 1917, with gunshot wound to the head, fracture of skull.

 

[1]  NAA: B2455, EVANS T W

[2] ‘Items of News’, Mount Alexander Mail, 14 September 1916, p. 2. Retrieved February 7, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119637481

[3] NAA: B2455, EVANS T W, letter to Base Records, Melbourne, from Mrs S. H. Dunford, “Clear View”, Wongalia P.O., via Gunningbland, Parkes, 29th July 1920.

Samuel CLARK

Samuel CLARK

Per his initial military service record (Depot), Samuel Clark was born at Coonabarabran, N.S.W. He gave his age as 33 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 2 ½ inches tall, weight 118 pounds, with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He completed his medical examination at Dubbo on 8th November 1915, and was attested by at Dubbo on 8th November 1915. He claimed to have 3 months previous service in the Australia Light Horse, then was discharged due to illness.

His next of kin in his service record was listed as his mother, Mrs Josephine McDonald, Frederick Street, Dudley, near Newcastle.

The postal address he gave on his initial Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form at Dubbo on 22nd October 1915 was ‘Coonamble’. He did a preliminary medical examination at Coonamble on 22nd October 1915.

A Statutory Declaration in his service record stated that he ‘joined the Route March of recruits marching from Gilgandra to Sydney’.  Although he enlisted at Dubbo on 8th November 1915, the Coo-ees were marching from Lawson to Springwood in the Blue Mountains on that date. He would have had to have caught up by train to join the Coo-ee March as it neared Sydney.

A letter from The Council of the Municipality of Penrith dated 3rd May 1916 stated that S. Clark ‘joined the Coo-ees at Penrith’, so he must have been one of the two recruits referred to in the Nepean Times as ‘not residents’ who joined the Coo-ee March during the Coo-ees’ overnight stay at Penrith on the 9th November 1915.[1]

After the Coo-ee March, Private Clark went before a Medical Board at Liverpool Camp on 17th November 1915, and was found medically unfit with Varicole, and was discharged on 29th November 1915.

[1] Alex Halden (Joe) Miller papers mainly relating to the Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March, New South Wales, 1912-1921, 1939. Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March correspondence and papers, 1915-1939 ; ‘Coo-ees at Penrith’, Nepean Times, 13 November 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86168730

Charles Henry HUNT

Charles Henry HUNT

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4804), Charles Henry Hunt was born at Hargreaves, N.S.W. He gave his age as 43 years, his marital status as widower, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 6 feet 1 ½ inches tall, weight 176 lbs., with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and medium brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

According to William Laurence Hunt’s and Jack Henry Hunt’s service records, Charles Henry Hunt signed consent forms (for persons under 21 years of age) for his two sons to enlist on 7th October 1915. According to the Bathurst Times, their father saw them off in the start of the Coo-ee March at Gilgandra, ‘but the thought of the parting was too much for him’.[1]

He went to Dubbo to enlist, and completed his medical on the 28th October 1915 (two weeks after the Coo-ees had passed through Dubbo), and was attested at Dubbo on the 28th October 1915. He then proceeded to Bathurst to catch up with the Coo-ees. According to the National Advocate, ‘on the road from Bathurst to Yetholme … a father, hearing that his two sons were amongst the marchers, overtook them near Raglan, was examined and took his place alongside his two sons’.[2]

After catching up with his two sons and the Coo-ees on Friday 29th October between Bathurst and Yetholme, he completed the Coo-ee March and went to Liverpool Camp, as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wingadee, Coonamble, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as daughter, Miss P. O. [Pearl Olive] Hunt, St. Patrick’s Convent, Dubbo, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Hunt, along with his two sons, and many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Hunt left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 8th June 1916.

Private Hunt served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then moved with it to Pozieres in early August 1916. On the 16th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was being relieved from the front line trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, France. Private Hunt was evacuated to the 7th Field Ambulance with shell shock and bruises. He rejoined the Battalion after only a short absence.

On the 28th October 1916 the 45th Battalion was training at Brucamps, France when Private Hunt was evacuated to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Rouen, France, suffering from Pleurisy. He was discharged on the 24th November 1916 and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, arriving on the 25th November 1916. On the 4th December 1916 Private Hunt was admitted to the 26th General Hospital. On the 7th December 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria sailing from Calais, France, for evacuation to England, suffering from Debility.

On the 11th December 1916 Private Hunt marched into the Number 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England. On the 25th January 1917 he was transferred to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England. On the 30th January 1917 Private Hunt underwent a medical board where it was determined that he suffered from Pleurisy and Rheumatism and he was classified as not suitable for active service nor home service.

On the 17th March 1917 Private Hunt departed England aboard the HMAT Beltana bound for Australia. He arrived in Sydney on the 15th May 1917, and was discharged as medically unfit on the 9th June 1917.

[1] ‘The Coo-ees’, The Bathurst Times, 10 October 1916, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109934579

[2] A “Tramp falls in. Father joins his two sons’, National Advocate, 30 October 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158152728

James MAHER

James MAHER

James Maher, 1915 (Photograph courtesy of L. Leo)

James Maher, 1915 (Photograph courtesy of L. Leo)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4847), James Maher was born at Gilgandra, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 18 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farm labourer.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches, weight 136 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed to have 7 months previous experience with the Gilgandra Rifle Club. He completed his medical, and was attested, on the 14th October 1915 at Dubbo, which was the day the Co-ees left Dubbo on the Coo-ee March.

His official date of joining the A.I.F. on his Attestation Paper in his service record is the 14th October 1915, the day the Coo-ees marched from Dubbo to Wongarbon.  James “Jim” Maher is however known as one of the 35 recruits from Gilgandra – one of those who caught up along the way.

There is an intial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force document in his military service record, addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Dubbo,  dated 14th October 1915, which is signed by both his father John Maher, and his mother Georgina Ellen Maher, giving parental permission for him to join, as he was under the age of 21.

It is unclear whether he left Dubbo with the Coo-ees, or did not catch up with the Coo-ees until further down the march route, as per family stories he did not join the Coo-ee March until Wallerawang .[2]

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Springfield, Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, J. Maher, Springfield, Gilgandra, N.S.W.

Along with many of the Coo-ees, Private Maher departed Sydney on the HMAT Star of England on the 8th March 1916. He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 20th May 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Maher left Alexandria aboard the Transport Kinafanus Castle bound for France. He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Maher served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916, then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 4th January 1917 Private Maher was appointed Lance Corporal, when the Battalion was preparing to go into action at Dernacourt, France.

On 23rd February 1917 the 45th Battalion was in the front line near Guedecourt, France, when Lance Corporal Maher was wounded in action, receiving gunshot wounds to his right buttock and left ankle.[3]   He was moved to the 14th Australian Field Ambulance, then moved back to the 45th Casualty Clearing Station on 24th February 1917. On 26th February 1917 he was placed aboard the 31st Ambulance Train, and sent to the 26th General Hospital at Etaples, France.

On 1st May 1917 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Newhaven at Boulogne, and evacuated to England, He was admitted to the Chatham Military Hospital at Chatham, ,England, later that same day.

On 31st August 1917 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England. On 21st August 1917 he was discharged and sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 16th December 1917 Lance Corporal Maher began his return to Australia, departing England on board the Hospital Ship Kanowa.

He arrived in Australia on 16th February 1917. He was discharged medically unfit on 10th July 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, MAHER JAMES

[2] Leo, L., email correspondence, 31st July 2014.

[3] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, February 1917.

John Herbert WATTS

John Herbert WATTS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2260), John Herbert Watts was born at Dunedoo, N.S.W. He gave his age as 18 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as Casual linesman. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 ½ inches tall, weight 137lbs., with a medium complexion, brown eyes, and light brown hair. His religious denomination was Methodist. He joined the Coo-ee March at Dubbo. He completed his medical on the 4th October 1915 at Dubbo, and was attested on the 14th October 1915 at Dubbo. He claimed to have no previous military service.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp. He was appointed as 15th reinforcement for the 1st Light Horse Regiment at Liverpool on 7th February 1916.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Lewis Street, Mudgee, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, Nathaniel Watts, Lewis Street, Mudgee, N.S.W.

Trooper Watts departed Sydney on the HMAT A25 Armadale on the 21st March 1916. He arrived in Egypt on the 24th April 1916.

On the 1st May 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Serapeum.

On the 4th June 1916 he embarked on the transport Scotian at Alexandria to join the British Expeditionary Force in France. He disembarked in Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Watts was appointed Driver on 2nd December 1916.

Per his service record, Driver Watts name was mentioned in Sir D. Haig’s despatch on the 7th April 1918, as deserving of special mention for conspicuous services rendered, which was promulgated in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, No. 165, 24th October 1918. The recommendation was ‘for continuous good service from 23rd September, 1917 to 25th February, 1918’.

Following being admitted to hospital sick with pyrexia on the 4th April 1918, Driver Watts was evacuated to England with Trench Fever on 16th April 1918, where he was admitted to Duston War Hospital in Northampton. On 30th April 1918 he was transferred to 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield. He was granted leave from 2nd May 1918 to 16th May 1918. Driver Watts returned from furlough on 17th May 1918 and marched into No. 4 Command Depot, Hurdcott. From the 8th to the 13th August he was admitted to the Camp Isolation Hospital at Hurdcott with Scabies.

Driver Watts returned to France on 22nd September 1918. He was admitted to hospital on 21st November 1918, and transferred to England on 9th January 1919, and admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford on 10th January 1919.

Driver Watts departed England on 31st March 1919 on the HT Khyber to return to Australia, and disembarked in Sydney on 14th May 1919.

He was discharged on 16th May 1919.