Tag Archives: Dubbo recruits

Thomas William EVANS

Thomas William EVANS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4770), Thomas William Evans was born at Castlemaine, Victoria.[1]  He gave his age as 38 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as Labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 6inches tall, weight 149 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and light brown hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  He completed his medical examination at Dubbo on 12th October 1915, and was attested at Dubbo on 14th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees left Dubbo for Wongarbon).  He claimed to have had no previous military service.

His brother, Mr. J. Evans, later reported in the Mount Alexander Mail that he had ‘been engaged in farming’ in New South Wales for about three years before he enlisted, and that ‘he was one of those who made up the famous Gilgandra snowball’.[2]  A letter in his service record from a Mrs. S. H. Dunford, from a property near Parkes, enquiring as to his whereabouts after the war, stated that he had ‘enlisted with the Gilgandra Coo-ees’.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Parker Street, Castlemaine, Victoria, and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs I. [Isabella] Evans, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Evans, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, as 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

He was transferred to the 45th Battalion on 19th April 1916.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Evans left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle, bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Evans served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916, then as it moved to Pozieres in early August 1916.

On 14th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was in the front line trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich in France.  During this day 45th Battalion had casualties of 15 men wounded from artillery shelling.  Private Evans was one of the wounded.  He was evacuated to the 4th Field ambulance, then 44th Casualty Clearing Station, with a shrapnel wound to his back.  He was put on the Ambulance Train, and admitted to the 5th General Hospital at Rouen on 16th August 1916.

On 23rd August 1916 he was discharged, and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

He rejoined the 45th Battalion on 16th of September 1916 when it was conducting training at Victoria Camp near Rhenninghelst, Belgium.

On 19th November 1916 the 45th Battalion was moving into the front line at Grease Trench, just north of Gueducourt, France, when Private Evans was evacuated to the 38th Casualty Clearing Station sick with Influenza.

On 21st November 1916 he was placed aboard the 20th Ambulance Train, and conveyed to the 12th General Hospital at Rouen, France, where he was admitted on 22nd November 1916.

Private Evans was discharged from hospital on 2nd December 1916 and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France

Private Evans rejoined the 45th Battalion on 5th January 1917 when it was at Dernacourt, France, preparing to move to the front line.

On 20th February 1917 the 45th Battalion was in action near Guedecourt, France, when Private Evans was wounded in action for a second time, receiving a serious shrapnel wound to his right forehead that fractured his skull.  He was evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station, then on 25st February 1917 placed aboard the 21st Ambulance Train.  He was conveyed to the 11th Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France , where he was admitted on 26th February 1917, suffering from gunshot wound head penetrating cranium, severe.

On 19th April 1917 Private Evans was evacuated to England by Hospital Ship.  He was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth.

On 21st July 1917 Private Evans was evacuated to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 25th July 1917 Private Evans was discharged from hospital, and granted leave to report to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

Private Evans left England on 27th August 1917 for return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Pakeha, arriving in Australia on 25th October 1917.

He was discharged medically unfit on 22nd November 1917, with gunshot wound to the head, fracture of skull.

 

[1]  NAA: B2455, EVANS T W

[2] ‘Items of News’, Mount Alexander Mail, 14 September 1916, p. 2. Retrieved February 7, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119637481

[3] NAA: B2455, EVANS T W, letter to Base Records, Melbourne, from Mrs S. H. Dunford, “Clear View”, Wongalia P.O., via Gunningbland, Parkes, 29th July 1920.

Samuel CLARK

Samuel CLARK

Per his initial military service record (Depot), Samuel Clark was born at Coonabarabran, N.S.W. He gave his age as 33 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 2 ½ inches tall, weight 118 pounds, with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He completed his medical examination at Dubbo on 8th November 1915, and was attested by at Dubbo on 8th November 1915. He claimed to have 3 months previous service in the Australia Light Horse, then was discharged due to illness.

His next of kin in his service record was listed as his mother, Mrs Josephine McDonald, Frederick Street, Dudley, near Newcastle.

The postal address he gave on his initial Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form at Dubbo on 22nd October 1915 was ‘Coonamble’. He did a preliminary medical examination at Coonamble on 22nd October 1915.

A Statutory Declaration in his service record stated that he ‘joined the Route March of recruits marching from Gilgandra to Sydney’.  Although he enlisted at Dubbo on 8th November 1915, the Coo-ees were marching from Lawson to Springwood in the Blue Mountains on that date. He would have had to have caught up by train to join the Coo-ee March as it neared Sydney.

A letter from The Council of the Municipality of Penrith dated 3rd May 1916 stated that S. Clark ‘joined the Coo-ees at Penrith’, so he must have been one of the two recruits referred to in the Nepean Times as ‘not residents’ who joined the Coo-ee March during the Coo-ees’ overnight stay at Penrith on the 9th November 1915.[1]

After the Coo-ee March, Private Clark went before a Medical Board at Liverpool Camp on 17th November 1915, and was found medically unfit with Varicole, and was discharged on 29th November 1915.

[1] Alex Halden (Joe) Miller papers mainly relating to the Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March, New South Wales, 1912-1921, 1939. Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March correspondence and papers, 1915-1939 ; ‘Coo-ees at Penrith’, Nepean Times, 13 November 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86168730

Charles Henry HUNT

Charles Henry HUNT

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4804), Charles Henry Hunt was born at Hargreaves, N.S.W. He gave his age as 43 years, his marital status as widower, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 6 feet 1 ½ inches tall, weight 176 lbs., with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and medium brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

According to William Laurence Hunt’s and Jack Henry Hunt’s service records, Charles Henry Hunt signed consent forms (for persons under 21 years of age) for his two sons to enlist on 7th October 1915. According to the Bathurst Times, their father saw them off in the start of the Coo-ee March at Gilgandra, ‘but the thought of the parting was too much for him’.[1]

He went to Dubbo to enlist, and completed his medical on the 28th October 1915 (two weeks after the Coo-ees had passed through Dubbo), and was attested at Dubbo on the 28th October 1915. He then proceeded to Bathurst to catch up with the Coo-ees. According to the National Advocate, ‘on the road from Bathurst to Yetholme … a father, hearing that his two sons were amongst the marchers, overtook them near Raglan, was examined and took his place alongside his two sons’.[2]

After catching up with his two sons and the Coo-ees on Friday 29th October between Bathurst and Yetholme, he completed the Coo-ee March and went to Liverpool Camp, as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wingadee, Coonamble, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as daughter, Miss P. O. [Pearl Olive] Hunt, St. Patrick’s Convent, Dubbo, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Hunt, along with his two sons, and many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Hunt left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 8th June 1916.

Private Hunt served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then moved with it to Pozieres in early August 1916. On the 16th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was being relieved from the front line trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, France. Private Hunt was evacuated to the 7th Field Ambulance with shell shock and bruises. He rejoined the Battalion after only a short absence.

On the 28th October 1916 the 45th Battalion was training at Brucamps, France when Private Hunt was evacuated to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Rouen, France, suffering from Pleurisy. He was discharged on the 24th November 1916 and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, arriving on the 25th November 1916. On the 4th December 1916 Private Hunt was admitted to the 26th General Hospital. On the 7th December 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria sailing from Calais, France, for evacuation to England, suffering from Debility.

On the 11th December 1916 Private Hunt marched into the Number 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England. On the 25th January 1917 he was transferred to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England. On the 30th January 1917 Private Hunt underwent a medical board where it was determined that he suffered from Pleurisy and Rheumatism and he was classified as not suitable for active service nor home service.

On the 17th March 1917 Private Hunt departed England aboard the HMAT Beltana bound for Australia. He arrived in Sydney on the 15th May 1917, and was discharged as medically unfit on the 9th June 1917.

[1] ‘The Coo-ees’, The Bathurst Times, 10 October 1916, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109934579

[2] A “Tramp falls in. Father joins his two sons’, National Advocate, 30 October 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158152728

James MAHER

James MAHER

James Maher, 1915 (Photograph courtesy of L. Leo)

James Maher, 1915 (Photograph courtesy of L. Leo)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4847), James Maher was born at Gilgandra, N.S.W. He gave his age as 18 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farm labourer.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches, weight 136 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed to have 7 months previous experience with the Gilgandra Rifle Club. He completed his medical, and was attested, on the 14th October 1915 at Dubbo, which was the day the Co-ees left Dubbo on the Coo-ee March.

His official date of joining the AIF in his service record is the 14th October 1915.  James “Jim” Maher is however known as one of the 35 recruits from Gilgandra – one of those who caught up along the way.

There is an ‘Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force’ document in his military service record which is signed by both his father John Maher, and his mother Georgina Ellen Maher, giving parental permission for him to join, as he was under the age of 21.

It is unclear whether he left Dubbo with the Coo-ees, or did not catch up with the Coo-ees until further down the march route, as per family stories he did not join the Coo-ee March until Wallerawang .[1]

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Springfield, Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, J. Maher, Springfield, Gilgandra, N.S.W.

Along with many of the Coo-ees, Private Maher departed Sydney on the HMAT Star of England on the 8th March 1916. He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916. On the 20th May 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Maher left Alexandria aboard the Transport Kinafanus Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseille on the 8th June 1916.

On the 4th January 1917 Private Maher was appointed Lance Corporal, when the Battalion was at Dernacourt, France.

On the 2rd February 1917 the Battalion was being relieved from the front line near Guedecourt. Lance Corporal Maher was one of 10 members of the Battalion wounded on this day, with another 5 men were killed. Lance Corporal Maher received a shrapnel wound to his buttock and ankle. He was hospitalised and evacuated to England.

On the 16th December 1917 Lance Corporal Maher began his return to Australia, departing England on board the Hospital Ship No 2. He arrived in Australia on the 16th February 1917, and was discharged on the 10th July 1918.

[1] Leo, L., email correspondence, 31st July 2014.

John Herbert WATTS

John Herbert WATTS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2260), John Herbert Watts was born at Dunedoo, N.S.W. He gave his age as 18 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as Casual linesman. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 ½ inches tall, weight 137lbs., with a medium complexion, brown eyes, and light brown hair. His religious denomination was Methodist. He joined the Coo-ee March at Dubbo. He completed his medical on the 4th October 1915 at Dubbo, and was attested on the 14th October 1915 at Dubbo. He claimed to have no previous military service.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp. He was appointed as 15th reinforcement for the 1st Light Horse Regiment at Liverpool on 7th February 1916.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Lewis Street, Mudgee, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, Nathaniel Watts, Lewis Street, Mudgee, N.S.W.

Trooper Watts departed Sydney on the HMAT A25 Armadale on the 21st March 1916. He arrived in Egypt on the 24th April 1916.

On the 1st May 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Serapeum.

On the 4th June 1916 he embarked on the transport Scotian at Alexandria to join the British Expeditionary Force in France. He disembarked in Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Watts was appointed Driver on 2nd December 1916.

Per his service record, Driver Watts name was mentioned in Sir D. Haig’s despatch on the 7th April 1918, as deserving of special mention for conspicuous services rendered, which was promulgated in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, No. 165, 24th October 1918. The recommendation was ‘for continuous good service from 23rd September, 1917 to 25th February, 1918’.

Following being admitted to hospital sick with pyrexia on the 4th April 1918, Driver Watts was evacuated to England with Trench Fever on 16th April 1918, where he was admitted to Duston War Hospital in Northampton. On 30th April 1918 he was transferred to 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield. He was granted leave from 2nd May 1918 to 16th May 1918. Driver Watts returned from furlough on 17th May 1918 and marched into No. 4 Command Depot, Hurdcott. From the 8th to the 13th August he was admitted to the Camp Isolation Hospital at Hurdcott with Scabies.

Driver Watts returned to France on 22nd September 1918. He was admitted to hospital on 21st November 1918, and transferred to England on 9th January 1919, and admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford on 10th January 1919.

Driver Watts departed England on 31st March 1919 on the HT Khyber to return to Australia, and disembarked in Sydney on 14th May 1919.

He was discharged on 16th May 1919.

Henry MOSS

Henry MOSS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2221), Henry Moss was born at Mossgiel, N.S.W. He gave his age as 24 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as shearer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 152 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He joined the Coo-ee March at Dubbo. He undertook a preliminary medical at Cobar on 11th October 1915, giving his postal address on this document as “Cobar”. He completed his medical on the 13th October 1915 at Dubbo, and was attested on the 13th October 1915 at Dubbo. He claimed to have no previous military service.

After completing the remainder of the march he went to Liverpool Camp. He was appointed as 15th reinforcement for the 1st Light Horse Regiment at Liverpool on 7th February 1916.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Bulli, South Coast, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Moss, Bulli, South Coast, N.S.W.

Private Moss departed Sydney on the HMAT A25 Armadale on the 21st March 1916. He arrived in Egypt on the 24th April 1916.

On the 18th May 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Serapeum.

On the 4th June 1916 he embarked on the transport Scotian at Alexandria to join the British Expeditionary Force in France. He disembarked in Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Moss was appointed Lance Corporal in the field on 17th November 1916.

On the 4th June 1916 L/Corporal Moss was transferred to the 45th Battalion.

L/Corporal Moss was wounded in action on 7th June 1917, when he received a gunshot wound to his left arm and jaw, and was taken to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station. On the 8th June he was moved to the 7th General Hospital at St Omer. On the 4th August he was admitted to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital in Dartmouth in England.

L/Corporal Moss departed England on 26th September 1917 on the HMAT Borda to return to Australia, and disembarked in Sydney on 25th November 1917.

He was medically discharged on 2nd March 1918.

Denis Roy GREEN

Denis Roy GREEN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4782), Denis Roy Green was born at Bathurst, N.S.W. He gave his age as 18 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as Flour mill hand. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8 ½ inches tall, weight 135 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He joined the Coo-ee March at Dubbo. He completed his medical on the 14th October 1915 at Dubbo, and was attested on the 14th October 1915 at Dubbo. He claimed to have had 10 months previous military service in Cadets B Coy.

After completing the remainder of the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 49 Carlingford Street, Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother [recorded incorrectly as his wife], Mrs. A. Robinson, 49 Carlingford Street, Bathurst, N.S.W.

Private Green departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England on the 8th March 1916. He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 16th April 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Telelkebir.

He proceeded to join the British Expeditionary Force in France, embarking at Alexandria on 6th June 1916 on the HT Ionian, and disembarking at Marseilles on 15th June 1916. On 21st July 1916 he marched out to join the unit.

On the 22nd July 1916 he joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion in the field from the 2nd reinforcement of the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On 2nd June 1917 he was detached for duty with Divisional Mule Transport. On 13th June 1917 he rejoined 4th Pioneer Battalion from detachment.

On 30th July 1917 he was appointed Driver.

On 21st September 1918 he went on leave in England.

Driver Green returned to Australia on 22nd July 1919 on the HT Ulysses, disembarking in Sydney on 5th September, 1919.

He was discharged on 20th February 1921 as medically unfit.

Reginald Henry CHAMBERLAIN

Reginald Henry CHAMBERLAIN

Reginald Henry Chamberlain enlisted four times during the First World War.

Per his military service record (regimental no. 3021), Reginald Henry Chamberlain was born at Sydney, N.S.W. He gave his age as 24 years and 5 months (at the time of his 1917 application), his marital status as single, and his occupation as motor mechanic.

He first joined on 5th November 1914, completing his medical at Liverpool on 6th November 1914, and his attestation at Liverpool on 9th November 1914. He stated he had no previous military experience on this application form. However, he was discharged as “unlikely to become an efficient soldier” on 20th November 1914.

He joined again on 7th December 1914, completing his medical and attestation at Liverpool on 9th December 1914. He was discharged on 29th December 1914 with varicocele.

Reginald Henry Chamberlain joined again on 29th July 1915, completing his medical at Sydney on 29th July 1915, and his attestation at Liverpool on 5th August 1915. The date of discharge is not shown for this enlistment period in his service record.

However, he joined again at Parkes, undertaking his medical and attestation at Parkes on 11th October 1915. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 5 ¾ inches tall, weight 123 lbs., with a medium complexion, blue/grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He gave his age on this application to enlist form as 22 years and 11 months. Private Chamberlain was one of two recruits (along with Joseph Armstrong who joined at Parkes on the 11th October 1915), who travelled to Dubbo on the morning on Wednesday 13th October 1915, along with three others who entered Dubbo Military Camp (Western Champion, 14/10/1915, p. 18).

It was reported in The Western Champion (21/10/1915, p. 17) that the Parkes Recruiting Association had held a recruiting meeting ‘for the purpose of enrolling recruits who were willing to join the volunteers now on the way, by road, from Gilgandra to Sydney’, and that ‘five men had mounted the lorry in response to the appeal’, and that ‘one of them went on to Dubbo’, with the remaining four planning to proceed to Molong to join the continent.

However, the recruit who was sent to Dubbo by Parkes Recruiting Association to join the Coo-ees is not named anywhere in newspaper reports or in the official correspondence of the march held in the Mitchell Library. It appears one of them (Chamberlain or Armstrong) had a change of heart and decided to join the Coo-ees on their march to Sydney, instead of entering Dubbo Military Camp.

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Armstrong went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. However, he was discharged again as being medically unfit on 29th November 1915 before a medical board at Liverpool with varicocele.

On his fourth attempt at enlistment, he successfully completed his medical and attestation on 22nd January 1917 in Sydney. On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed (as on his earlier applications to enlist) as his brother William Thomas Chamberlain, 19 Clevedon Road, Parnell, Auckland, N.Z.

Private Chamberlain departed Sydney on the HMAT A24 Benalla on 10th May 1917 as 7th Reinforcement for the 36th Battalion. He disembarked at Plymouth, England on the 19th July 1917. On 20th July he marched into 9th Training Battalion in England.

He proceeded to France on the 27th December 1917 from Southampton.

He marched out to the Front on 30th December 1917. On the 3rd January 1918 he was taken on strength in the 36th Battalion, and re-allocated regimental number 3021A.

He was appointed Lance Corporal on 20th February 1918.

On 30th April 1918 L/Corporal Chamberlain was transferred to the 35th Battalion. He was also wounded in action, being gassed, on the same day, and admitted to the 9th Australian Field Ambulance. He was transferred to the 12th Casualty Clearing Station on 2nd May, then to the 3rd Australian General Hospital in Abbeville on the 6th May 1918.

He embarked for England on 1lth May 1918, and was admitted to Whipps Cross Military Hospital in Leytonstone for shell gas.

He was transferred to the 1st Auxiliary Hospital, Harefield, on 27th May 1918.

He was discharged from hospital on 29th May 1918, then after being granted furlough, marched into No. 4 Command Depot, Hurdcott on 12th June 1918.

On 16th January 1919 he reverted to the rank of Private on being taken on strength of A.M.T.S. (Australian Motor Transport Section) and was mustered as Driver M.T.

He was discharged from the A.I.F. in London on being demobilized on 5th October 1919, but following his request for reinstatement, was then reinstated in the A.I.F. on 27th October 1919.

Private Reginald Henry Chamberlain returned to Australia on 18th December 1919 on the HT Konigin Luise, disembarking in Sydney on 7th February 1919.

He was discharged on 21st March 1920.

Joseph ARMSTRONG

Joseph ARMSTRONG

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4430), Joseph Armstrong was born at Bally-Bofey, Ireland. He gave his age as 43 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. He did a preliminary medical examination at Condobolin on 8th October 1915, then completed his medical, and attestation, at Parkes on 12th October, 1915. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 ½ inches tall, weight 162 lbs., with a fresh complexion, blue grey eyes, and light brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to have served in the 3rd N.S.W. Imperial Bushmen for 2 ½ years in the Boer War.

Private Armstrong was one of two recruits (along with Reginald Henry Chamberlain who joined at Parkes on the 11th October 1915), who travelled to Dubbo on the morning on Wednesday 13th October 1915, along with three others who entered Dubbo Military Camp (Western Champion, 14/10/1915, p. 18).

It was reported in The Western Champion (21/10/1915, p. 17) that the Parkes Recruiting Association had held a recruiting meeting ‘for the purpose of enrolling recruits who were willing to join the volunteers now on the way, by road, from Gilgandra to Sydney’, and that ‘five men had mounted the lorry in response to the appeal’, and that ‘one of them went on to Dubbo’, with the remaining four planning to proceed to Molong to join the contingent.

However, the recruit who was sent to Dubbo by Parkes Recruiting Association to join the Coo-ees is not named anywhere in newspaper reports or in the official correspondence of the march held in the Mitchell Library. It appears one of them (Armstrong or Chamberlain) had a change of heart and decided to join the Coo-ees on their march to Sydney, instead of entering Dubbo Military Camp.

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Armstrong went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 125 Flinders Street, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his cousin, Mrs E. Phillips, 125 Flinders Street, Sydney, N.S.W.

Private Armstrong departed Sydney on the HMAT A70 Ballarat on 16th February 1916 as 14th Reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on the 22nd March 1916. On the 1st April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Battalion.

He embarked on the HT Caledonian at Alexandria on 19th June 1916, and disembarked at Marseilles, France, on 29th June 1916.

He was initially reported killed in action on 19th July 1916 at the Battle of Fromelles in France.  However he had been wounded with a bullet wound to the buttock and thigh during this battle, and taken a prisoner by the Germans. On 19th October 1916  he was officially reported as a Prisoner of War, at Wurzburg, Germany.

After the end of the war he was repatriated, arriving in England on 30th December 1918. He then returned to Australia leaving Weymouth on the transport Karoa on 28th March 1919, arriving in Australia on 10th May 1919.  He was medically discharged on 24th June 1919.

Joseph Patrick WALLIS

 Joseph Patrick WALLIS (aka Joseph Patrick WAILES)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4617), Joseph Patrick Wallis was born at Darlinghurst, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 18 years and 4 months (though he was younger), his marital status as single, and his occupation as seaman. He undertook a preliminary medical examination at Trangie on 6th October 1915 (where he gave his occupation as stableboy, and address as 9 George Street, Burwood). His description on his medical was height 5 feet 6 ¼ inches tall, weight 112 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and light brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.

He joined the Coo-ee March at Dubbo. He completed his medical on the 13th October 1915 at Dubbo, and was attested on 13th October 1915 at Dubbo. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wollara Wollar, via Mudgee, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his aunt, Mrs Sarah Doyle, Wollara Wollar, via Mudgee, N.S.W. (This was later changed in his service record to his mother Mrs Jane Wailes at various Sydney addresses).

Private Wallis departed Sydney on the HMAT A70 Ballarat on the 16th February 1916 as 14th Reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on the 22nd March 1916. On the 1st April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Battalion.

He embarked on the HT Caledonian at Alexandria on 19th June 1916, and disembarked at Marseilles, France, on 29th June 1916.

He was killed during the Battle of Fromelles in France on 19/20th July 1916. He was originally listed with “No known grave”, and commemorated at V. C. Corner Australian Cemetery and Memorial at Fromelles.

His body was identified in 2010, and was buried in the Fromelles (Pheasant Wood) Military Cemetery, France.

Joseph Patrick Wallis headstone at Fromelles (Pheseant Wood) Military Cemetery, France (Photograph S & H Thompson 2012)

Joseph Patrick Wallis headstone at Fromelles (Pheseant Wood) Military Cemetery, France (Photograph S & H Thompson 2012)

Private Wailes’ name is also commemorated on panel 160 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Research note: The NSW Birth Certificate for Joseph Wailes shows he was born on 28th August 1898, so he was actually only 17 years and 1 month when he enlisted with the Coo-ees, and 17 years and 10 months when he died.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WALLIS JOSEPH PATRICK

[2] NSW Birth Certificate WAILES JOSEPH  27421/1898 FREDERICK C  JANE SYDNEY