Tag Archives: Military Medal

Edgar Lewis CUDDEFORD

Edgar Lewis CUDDEFORD (MM)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5352), Edgar Lewis Cuddeford was born at Albury, N.S.W.[1]  (His name was recorded as Edward Lewis Cudderford on his embarkation roll).[2] He gave his age as 18 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as ‘engineering’ on his Attestation Paper. (His occupation was listed as ‘Engineer’ on his embarkation roll, however he was an engineering apprentice at Clyde Engineering Company, with 1 year and 11 months served of a 5 year apprenticeship, at the time he enlisted).[3]  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 2 ½ inches tall, weight 110 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to have 4 years previous military service in the Senior Cadets.

He completed his medical examination at Parramatta on 10th November 1915 (where the Coo-ees held a recruitment meeting, and stayed that evening). He was attested by Lieutenant Edward V. Steel at Ashfield on 11th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Yelta, Station Street, Harris Park, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his mother, Mrs M. J. [Mary Jane] Cuddeford, Mahonga Station, via Albury, N.S.W.[4]

On 9th April 1916 Private Cuddeford departed Sydney on the HMAT Nestor A71 with the 17th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion (along with several other Coo-ees), bound for Egypt.

Photograph of HMAT A71 Nestor loaded with troops on an earlier voyage, taken 11 October 1915. Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. PB0607.

On 20th May 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 7th June 1916 Private Cuddeford left Alexandria aboard the transport Huntspill, bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

He was sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 9th August 1916 Private Cuddeford was taken on strength of the 45th Battalion when it was manning support trenches in the vicinity of Pozieres, France.[5]

Private Cuddeford served with the 45th Battalion through its actions on the Western Front as a Battalion Headquarters runner, undertaking dispatch work.

He managed to survive the war unscathed. He stated in an oral history interview undertake later in his life (in 1983), that ‘I was fortunate that way’ and that ‘I never got wounded’.[6]

On 11th March 1918 Private Cuddeford was granted leave to England. He re-joined the 45th Battalion in France on 3rd April 1918.

On 18th July 1918 Private Cuddeford was sent to the 4th Army Rest Camp. He re-joined the Battalion on 28th July 1918.

On 18th September 1918 the 45th Battalion was engaged in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Le Verguier, France,  in which Private Cuddeford took part.

He was later awarded a Military Medal. The citation reads: ‘For bravery and devotion to duty during attack of 18th September, 1918, on old British outpost line near LE VERGUIER. Private Cuddeford is a Battalion Headquarters Runner, and during the advance, continually carried messages under adverse and most trying circumstances to various portions of the attacking line, always returning and giving voluntary and correct information of the situation. During consolidation, and after, owing to casualties in runners Private Cuddeford on numerous occasions volunteered to take messages, always proving most reliable and cheerfully carrying out his duties.’[7]

Notification of Private Cuddeford’s  award was gazetted in Second Supplement No. 31512,  to The London Gazette, 20th August 1919 (page 10585), and was also published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, no. 135, dated 11th December, 1919.[8]

On 30th January 1919 Private Cuddeford marched out of the 45th Battalion to commence his return to Australia.

On 10th February 1919 he departed Le Harve, France, bound for England. He arrived at Weymouth on 11th February 1919.

On 13th April 1919 Private Cuddeford departed England aboard the H.T. Commonwealth bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 12th June 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 7th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L

[2] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Edward Lewis Cuddeford,  5352.

[3] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L  ; FIRST TO BE KILLED. (1916, September 2). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 – 1950), p. 11. Retrieved April 8, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86069235

[4] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Edward Lewis Cuddeford,  5352.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/6 – August 1916.

[6] Edgar Lewis Cuddeford MM (5352) as a private 45th Infantry Battalion AIF, France 1916-1918, interviewed by Dr Alistair Thomson on 6 September 1983, Australian War Veterans of the Great War – 1914 – 1918 Oral history project, 6 September 1983, AWM Accession no. S01308, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C88153

[7] NAA: B2455, CUDDEFORD E L

[8] The London Gazette, 19 August 1919, Supplement 31512, p. 10585,  https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/31512/supplement/10585 ; Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation (1919, December 11). Commonwealth of Australia Gazette (National : 1901 – 1973), p. 2373. Retrieved April 8, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232512820

 

 

 

Frederick Graham HARVEY

Frederick Graham HARVEY (MM)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4792), Frederick Graham Harvey was born at Wagga Wagga, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 19 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farmer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 10 stone, with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and fair hair.  His religious denomination was Presbyterian.   He claimed that he had no previous military service.

The National Advocate reported on 22nd October 1915 that  ‘Fred Graham Harvey’ of the ‘Cosmopolitan Hotel, Bathurst’, was one of the 16 ‘Bathurst Burrs’  recruited by the Bathurst Recruiting Association  who had ‘been enlisted and passed by the medical officer ‘ to join the Coo-ees when they reached Bathurst.[2]

The National Advocate reported that ‘a dozen men actually left Bathurst with the Coo-ees, and that ’the remainder of the Bathurst unit will follow on and catch up with the Coo-ees probably at Wallerawang and Lithgow’.[3]

His ‘Date of Joining’ per his embarkation roll was 22nd October 1915.[4]  Per a Statutory Declaration in his service record, Frederick Graham Harvey stated he was attested at Bathurst. A letter from his mother dated 23rd October 1915 from West Maitland, giving permission for him to enlist, is in his file.

However, there appears to be an anomaly with his enlistment papers, as his initial enlistment paperwork from Bathurst appears to be missing from his file.  The ‘Oath to the Taken by Person Being Enlisted’ section of his Attestation Paper has the initial details of ‘taken and subscribed at Bathurst’  on ‘28th October 1915’ crossed out (the day the Coo-ees arrived in Bathurst), and changed to 13th November 1915 at Liverpool.  He was attested at Liverpool my Lieutenant E. Shaw on 13th November 1915 (the day after the Coo-ee March finished in Sydney), and he completed a medical examination at Liverpool on the same day.

So it appears he presented to enlist with the Coo-ees in Bathurst, but it is unclear if he marched out of Bathurst with the Coo-ees, or caught up with them along the way.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp with the Coo-ees as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

An entry in his service record dated 22nd November 1915 at Liverpool stated that he had been absent from guard duty [date not recorded], and he was warned.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 58 Keppel Street, Bathurst, N.S.W. His next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs S. Harvey, 23 Wolfe Street, West Maitland, N.S.W.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Harvey, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion, and arrived in Egypt on  11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Harvey was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On 4th June 1916 Private Harvey left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian, bound for France. He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Harvey was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 2nd December 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was constructing tramways near Longueval, France when Private Harvey suffered a sprained back.[6] He was sent to the 15th Australian Field Ambulance. On 3rd December 1916 he was sent to a Rest Station. On 13th December 1916 he re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion, when it was still constructing tramways near Longueval, France.

He went to hospital sick on 14th March 1917.  He re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion from hospital the next day.

On 14th October 1917 Private Harvey was awarded the Military Medal for action he performed on 26th September 1917 when the 4th Pioneer Battalion was engaged on the Ypres Sector in the vicinity of Westhoek, Belgium.

The citation reads:

For gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the YPRES Sector. This man assisted his Officer in carrying out a very daring daylight reconnaissance immediately following the attack on 26th September. Under very heavy hostile shell fire a location for an important Communication Trench and taped and laid out. After this was completed he returned to a rendezvous to guide the Company up to dig the Trench. He went forward reconnoitering for the safest routes possible and by his initiative, enabled the digging party to reach, and successfully completed the job. By his coolness and courage he set a fine example to all.[7]

Notification of Private Harvey’s  award was gazetted in Third Supplement No. 30431 to The London Gazette, 14th December 1917 (page 13198), and was also published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, 2nd May 1918 (page 1036).[8]

On 24th December 1917 Private Harvey was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance suffering Pyrexia.

He was discharged and returned to the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 2nd January 1918, when it was digging trenches near Guyencourt, France.[9]

On 21st March 1918 Private Harvey was promoted to Lance Corporal.

On 6th May 1918 Lance Corporal Harvey was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Bronchitis. He was moved to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station later that day.  On 7th May 1918 he was placed aboard the 27th Ambulance Train. On 8th May 1918 he was admitted to the 6th General Hospital at Rouen, France.

On 12th May 1918 Lance Corporal Harvey was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Grantully Castle for evacuation to England. On 13th May 1918 he was admitted to the Winchester General Military Hospital.

On 8th June 1918 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On1st July 1918 he was discharged and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

On 5th September 1918 Lance Corporal Harvey marched into the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge Deverill, England.

On 20th September 1918 Lance Corporal Harvey was transferred to the 1st Training Brigade.

On 13th January 1919 Lance Corporal Harvey marched into a concentration camp at Codford, England, awaiting his return to Australia.

On 21st March 1919 Lance Corporal Harvey left England on the H.M.T. Kildonian Castle, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 9th May 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 23rd June 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, HARVEY F G

[2] Bathurst Route Marchers. (1915, October 22). National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158147800

[3] To the Sea (1915, October 30). National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved January 27, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158152730

[4] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Frederick Graham Harvey,  4792. HMAT Star of England A15, 8 March 1916.

[5] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Frederick Graham Harvey,  4792. HMAT Star of England A15, 8 March 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 14/16 – 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, December 1916.

[7] Australian War Memorial. Honours and Awards (Recommendation), Francis [sic] Graham Harvey, Private, 4792, 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/R1586601

[8] Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation (1918, May 2). Commonwealth of Australia Gazette (National : 1901 – 1973), p. 1036. Retrieved January 29, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232464380

[9] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 14/16 – 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, January 1918.

Thomas Henry TURVEY

Thomas Henry TURVEY

Private T. H. Turvey, of Gilgandra "Coo-ees", awarded Military Medal (Newspaper unknown, 1917)

Private T. H. Turvey, of Gilgandra “Coo-ees”, awarded Military Medal (Newspaper unknown, 1917)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4902A), Thomas Henry Turvey was born at Gulgong, N.S.W. [1]  He gave his age as 22 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as laborer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 8 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 10 lbs., with a dark complexion, light blue eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.  He completed his medical examination on 4th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain Eade at Lawson on the 7th October 1915.

Thomas Turvey stated that he had joined the Coo-ees at Katoomba in a court case in December 1915, in which he was a witness.[2]  The Coo-ees had stayed overnight at Katoomba on 5th November 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, T. [Thomas] Turvey, Gilgandra, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Turvey, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

He was transferred to the 45th Battalion on 20th May 1916.

On 7th June 1916 Private Turvey left Alexandria aboard the transport Huntspill bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

On 19th July 1916 Private Turvey was taken on strength of the 45th Battalion.

Private Turvey served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France, in July 1916, then the Battle of the Somme around Pozieres, Mouquet Farm and Flers, without injury or illness.

His service record states that he was allocated the letter “A” to his regimental number on 22nd February 1917 on account of duplication of numbers.

Private Turvey was serving with the 45th Battalion when it was in action around Guedecourt, France, where on 27th February 1917 he was recommended for, and subsequently awarded, the Military Medal for bravery in the field, for his action on the 22nd/23rd February 1917.  This award was published in the London Gazette Supplement no. 30036 on 26th April 1917, and promulgated in the Commonwealth Gazette No. 133 on 21st August 1917.[3]

The citation for the Military Medal reads: “For his gallant conduct and devotion to duty during an attack on a enemy trench near Guedecourt on the night of 22/23rd Febry. 1917 when as a runner he maintained communication overland under artillery and machine gun fire between the front line and Headquarters. His work in this respect was quite consistent with his previous fine record established for coolness and determination in the face of all obstacles”.[4]

On 7th June 1917 the 45th Battalion was involved in an attack at Messines Ridge when Private Turvey received a gunshot wound to the abdomen.  He was one of 352 members of the 45th Battalion wounded during the attack.  Another 100 were killed and 50 missing.   He was evacuated to the 77th Field Ambulance, then to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station.  On 9th June 1917 he was admitted to the 2nd Australian General Hospital at Wimereux.

On 11th June 1917 Private Turvey was placed aboard the Hospital Ship St Patrick for evacuation to England, and he was admitted to Royal Herbert Hospital at Woolwich with a gunshot wound to his right side on the same day.

On 22nd June 1917 Private Turvey was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 13th July 1917 he was discharged from hospital, and sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 27th July 1917 Private Turvey commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Demosthenes.

He arrived in Australia on 29th September 1917, and was discharged medically unfit on 1st November 1917.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, TURVEY THOMAS HENRY

[2] ‘Alleged Disloyal Conduct’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 3 December 1915, p. 4. Retrieved February 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77602826

[3] The London Gazette, 26 April 1917, Supplement 30036, p. 3948, https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30036/supplement/3948 ; Commonwealth Gazette, No. 133, 21st August 1917, p. 1786, https://www.legislation.gov.au/content/HistoricGazettes1917 (and copy in service record)

[4] Australian War Memorial. Recommendation for Military Medal, Thomas Henry Turvey, 27th February 1917, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1625170/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leslie Webster GREENLEAF

Leslie Webster GREENLEAF (MM)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4783), Leslie Webster Greenleaf was born in London, England.[1] He gave his age as 18 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as butcher. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 126 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He completed his medical on the 9th October 1915 at Gilgandra and was attested by Captain Nicholas on the 9th October 1915 at Gilgandra. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Eumungerie Post Office, N.S.W., and his next of kin was his sister, Miss P. Greenleaf, 2 Woodside Road, Surrey, England.

Private Greenleaf departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England on the 8th March 1916 with the 15th reinforcements to the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 7th June 1916 Private Greenleaf left Alexandria aboard the Transport Ionian bound for France, arriving at Marseille on the 14th June 1916.

On the 29th August 1916, during the Battle of the Somme, when the 13th Battalion was attacking Mouquet Farm, he received a gunshot wound to his right hand. Private Greenleaf was hospitalised then evacuated to England.

Private Greenleaf returned to France on the 29th December 1917.

On the 2nd May 1918 Private Greenleaf was with his Battalion defending Villers-Bretonneux when he undertook an action for which he was recommended for (and subsequently awarded with) the Military Medal.

The citation read: ‘East of Villers-Bretonneux on the morning of the 2nd May, 1918, when an officer was severely wounded by M.G. fire and lay within full view of the enemy, Privates Greenleaf and Smith went to his assistance and carried him in at great personal risk. With the assistance of two other men they improvised a stretcher squad, and, as the case was a serious one, carried through with it to the Regimental Aid Post. This was done in broad day light, and practically the whole route was under observation of enemy snipers who were very active.’

On the 20th May 1918, when the 13th Battalion was still defending Villers-Bretonneux, three members of the Battalion were wounded. Private Greenleaf received a bomb wound to his left arm, being wounded in action for the second time. He was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance, the taken to the 47th Casualty Clearing Station. On 23rd May 1918 Private Greenleaf admitted to the 47th General Hospital at Le Treport, France.

On 3rd  June 1918 Private Greenleaf was evacuated to England by Hospital Ship Panama (gun shot wound left arm). On 4th June 1918 Private Greenleaf was admitted to the Kitchener Military Hospital at Brighton, England. On 11th June 1918 Private Greenleaf was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

Private Greenleaf was discharged from hospital on leave from 13th June 1918, to report to No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 27th June 1918.

Private Greenleaf began his return to Australia aboard the H.T.  City of Exeter on 15th January 1919.

He arrived in Australia on 2nd March 1919.

He was discharged on 11th May 1919.

[1] NAA: B2455, GREENLEAF L W