Tag Archives: Blayney recruits

Clarence William STEWART

Clarence William STEWART

Per his military service record (5222), Clarence William Stewart was born at Hargraves, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 151 lbs, with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  His next of kin on his Attestation paper was recorded as his mother, Mrs Mary Stewart, Hargraves, N.S.W.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 25th October 1915, (7 days after the Coo-ees had left that town), then travelled to Blayney to catch up with the Coo-ees.  He was attested by Captain Eade at Blayney on 26th October 1915.  He claimed to have no previous military experience.

‘C. W. Stewart’ was named in the Bathurst Times as one of the Wellington recruits that joined the Coo-ees at Blayney on 26th October 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 2nd February 1916 Private Stewart was charged with being absent without leave for 6 days. He was fined 30 shillings.

On 7th February 1916 Private Stewart was charged with being absent from special picquet. He was fined 10 shillings.

On 22nd February 1916 Private Stewart was charged with being absent from parade. He was fined 5 shillings.

His mother sent a letter  dated 29th March 1916 requesting her underage son be discharged from the A.I.F., in which she stated: ‘’In reference to my son Clarrie … I now find it my absolute duty to ask you, please, to discharge him at once as it is a case of necessity I cannot allow him to stay in any longer. If at any time when he is twenty one, he has the same patriotic feelings, he may, with my consent, re-enlist”.[3]

A copy of his birth certificate was also provided, dated 28th March 1916, which showed that his date of birth was 17th October 1897.[4] Clarence William Stewart therefore had only been 18 years and 9 days old when he enlisted on 26th October 1915 (and not 21 years of age as stated on his Attestation paper).

On 7th April 1916 Private Stewart was discharged at his mother’s request.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, STEWART C W

[2] ‘Western news’, The Bathurst Times,  27 October 1915,  p. 3. Retrieved January 3, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111244211

[3] NAA: B2455, STEWART C W, letter to O.C., A Company, 13 Battalion, from M. Stewart, 29 March 1916.

[4] NAA: B2455, STEWART C W, Birth Certificate.

George Elsie EWENS

George Elsie EWENS

Pte. George Ewens, of Mandurama (Evening News, 20/9/1917)

Pte. George Ewens, of Mandurama (Evening News, 20/9/1917)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4771), George Elsie Ewens was born at Mandurama, N.S.W.[1]  (His name is listed in some sections of his service record as George Leslie Ewens). He gave his age as 24 years and 3 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farmer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 11 stone, with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Presbyterian.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

The Bathurst Times reported on 27th October 1915 that at Blayney (where the Coo-ees had stayed overnight the night before) ‘… as a result of a collection made amongst the people of Carcoar, Mandurama and Lyndhurst … the sum of £26 had been handed to Captain Hitchen as help to his men on their way to the front’, and that ‘They had also brought along a recruit in the person of Mr. George Ewins [sic], of Mandurama’.[2]

There is an irregularity in his service record, which perhaps indicates that some of his initial paperwork may have been lost.  His Statement of Service is recorded as having commenced on 28th October 1915 (when the Coo-ees were at Bathurst).  He completed his Certificate of Medical Examination at Liverpool on 23rd November 1915.  The Oath in his Attestation Paper was dated 28th October 1915, and recorded as ‘taken and subscribed at Bathurst’, but it was not signed by an Attesting Officer until 6th January 1916.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Cathcart, Mandurama, N.S.W., and his next of kin was his father, J. B. [James Bell] Ewens, at the same address.  His date of joining on this document was 26th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees stayed overnight at Blayney).

On 8th March 1916 Private Ewens, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, as 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

He was transferred to the 45th Battalion on 19th April 1916.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Ewens left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle, bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Ewens served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France, in July 1916 then as it moved to Pozieres in early August 1916.  On 30th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was in the front line trenches between Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in France.  The Battalion had casualties of 1 man killed and 4 wounded.  Private Ewens was one of the wounded, suffering gunshot wounds to his back and leg.  (Fellow Coo-ee Private Healey was evacuated with shell shock on the same day).  Private Ewens was evacuated to the 44th Casualty Clearing Station, then admitted to the 13th General Hospital at Boulogne, France, the next day, on 31st August 1916.

On 2nd September 1916 Private Ewens was transferred to England aboard the Hospital Ship Newhaven, and admitted to the 2nd Eastern General Hospital in Brighton, England.

On 6th October 1916 he was discharged from hospital, and sent to the Number 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England.

On 8th October 1916 Private Ewens was granted leave, to report back on 25th October 1916.

On 27th October 1916 he marched out the Command Depot at Wareham.

On 11th November 1916 Private Ewens departed England to return to France.  He marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, on 13th November 1916.

He rejoined the 45th Battalion on 4th December 1916, when it was resting at Dernacourt, France.

On 23th February 1917 the 45th Battalion was in action near Guedecourt, France, when Private Ewens was wounded in action for the second time, receiving a gunshot wound to his left hand.  He was evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station, then on 25th February 1917 he was placed aboard the 21st Ambulance Train.  He was moved to the 10th General Hospital at Rouen, France, where he was admitted on 26th February 1917.

On 3th March 1917 Private Ewens was transferred to the 2nd Convalescent Depot also at Rouen, France.

On 29th March 1917 he was transferred to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

Private Ewens rejoined the 45th Battalion on 19th April 1917, when it was training at Bresle, France.

On 7th June 1917 the 45th Battalion was in action at Messines, Belgium, when Private Ewens was wounded in action for a third time, receiving a gunshot wound to his groin.  He was evacuated to the 77th Field Ambulance.  On 8th June 1917 he was sent to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station.  On 9th June 1917 he was moved back to the 4th General Hospital.

On 18th of June 1917 Private Ewens was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Newhaven at Calais, France, for evacuation to England.  He was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth on the same day.

The Evening News reported on 20th September 1917 (with an accompanying photograph) that ‘Mr Ewens, a farmer, of Mandurama, has received word that his son, Private George Ewens, who enlisted with the Coo-ees, was wounded for the third time at Messines … Private Ewens is now in hospital in England’.[3]

On 8th October 1917 Private Ewens was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.  On 12th October 1917 he was discharged to Depot at Weymouth.

Private Ewens left England on 5th November 1917, for return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Themistocles.

He arrived in Australia on 3rd January 1918, and was discharged medically unfit on 4th March 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, EWENS G L – Ewens George Leslie : SERN 4771 : POB Mandurama NSW : POE Bathurst NSW : NOK F Ewens James Bell

[2] ‘Western News’, The Bathurst Times,  27 October 1917, p. 3. Retrieved February 10, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111244211

[3] ‘N.S.W. Honor Roll’, Evening News,  20 September 1917, p. 6. Retrieved October 17, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article121247763

 

Joseph Francis HEALEY

Joseph Francis HEALEY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5385), Joseph Francis Healey was born at Leeds, England.[1]  His surname is spelt as “Healy” in some places in his service record.  He gave his age as 41 years and 3 months [although he appears to have been several years older than this], his marital status as single, and his occupation as cook.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

There is some irregularity in his service record. No details apart from his age, and recording his religious denomination as Roman Catholic, are given on his Certificate of Medical Examination, and it was not signed by an Examining Medical Officer.  His period of service in his service record is dated as having commenced on 26th October 1915 (when the Coo-ees were at Blayney).  He was attested by Lieutenant Edward J. Shaw on 13th November 1915, with the oath dated from 26th October 1915, and recorded as ‘taken and subscribed at Blayney’ on 26th October 1915.

The Leader named Joseph Healey as one of six men who joined the Coo-ees at Blayney.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as 15th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 21st November 1915 Private Healey was charged with being absent without leave, and fined 1 day’s pay.

Private Healey was transferred to 17th Reinforcement for the 13th Battalion on 11th March 1916.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 91 Rope Street, Leichhardt, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as friend, M. Riches, at the same address.

On 9th April 1916 Private Healey departed Sydney on the HMAT Nestor A71 (along with several other Coo-ees), bound for Egypt.

Photograph of HMAT A71 Nestor loaded with troops on an earlier voyage, taken 11 October 1915.  Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. PB0607.

Photograph of HMAT A71 Nestor loaded with troops on an earlier voyage, taken 11 October 1915. Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. PB0607.

On 7th June 1916 Private Healey departed Alexandria aboard His Majesty’s Transport Ionian bound for France, and arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.  He marched into the 4th Australian Divisional Base Depot at Etaples.

On 19th August 1916 Private Healey joined the 13th Battalion when it was in action around Pozieres, France.  Private Healey served through the fighting around Pozieres until 30th August 1916, when he was evacuated with Shell Shock.  He rejoined the Battalion the next day.

On 11th October 1916 the 13th Battalion was training at Quebec Camp at Rhenninghelst, Belgium. Private Healey was charged with being absent without leave from Camp from 10 pm on 8th October 1916 till 5 pm on 10th of October 1916.  He was awarded 3 days Field Punishment Number Two and fined 6 days pay.

On 4th February 1917 the 13th Battalion launched an attack on the German Trenches in front of the village of Guedecourt, France.  During this attack Private Healey was wounded in action when he received a gun shot wound to his left knee.  He was evacuated to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance on 5th February 1917.

On 9th February 1917 Private Healey was admitted to the 8th General Hospital at Rouen, France.  He was sent to Le Harve later that day, and boarded the Hospital Ship Formosa, bound for England.

He was admitted to the 2nd Birmingham War Hospital on 10th February 1917.

On 26th March 1917 Private Healey was evacuated to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

On 9th April 1917 Private Healey was discharged from hospital, and transferred to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

A Medical Report on an Invalid form in his service record dated 14th May 1917 stated that he was ‘over age – 47 years’.

On 21st July 1917 Private Healey departed England aboard the H.M.A.T. Euripides bound for Australia.

Private Healey arrived in Australia on 18th of September 1917.

He was discharged medically unfit at Sydney on 29th December 1917, with disability gun shot wound to the left leg, and over age.

[1] NAA: B2455, HEALY J F 5385

[2] ‘Blayney Recruits’, Leader, 29 October 1915, p. 8. Retrieved April 1, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842821

 

Louis Henry ATTENBOROUGH

Louis Henry ATTENBOROUGH

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4728), Louis Henry Attenborough was born at Stratton Audley, Oxford, [England]. He gave his age as 44 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as mechanic. His description on his certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 10 stone 10 lbs., with a fresh complexion, grey eyes, and hair  ‘going grey’. His religious denomination was ‘Free Thinker’. He claimed that he had no previous military service. His  ‘Joined on’ date was recorded as 27th October 1915.

Louis Attenborough was named in an article titled ‘Blayney recruits’ in The Leader as one of six men who have joined ‘as a result of the visit of the Coo-ees to Blayney’.[1] The Coo-ees had held a recruiting meeting and stayed overnight at Blayney on 26th October 1915.

He was attested by Captain Eade at Bathampton on 27th October 1915, where the Coo-ees stayed that evening, after leaving Blayney that morning.

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

He did not complete his medical examination until 13th November 1915, at Liverpool Camp.

On his embarkation roll his name was recorded as ‘Lewis Henry Attenborough’, and his address at time of enrolment was Blayney, N.S.W. His next of kin was listed as his brother, A. W. [Arthur] Attenborough, Alagallah, Bowral Street, Kensington, N.S.W. His religion was recorded on this document as Church of England.

On 8th March 1916 Private Attenborough, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Attenborough, along with some of the other Coo-ees, was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 4th June 1916 Private Attenborough left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian, bound for France. He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Attenborough served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France for the next six months, until on 9th December 1916, when he was sent to the 5th Australian Field Ambulance sick with Influenza. On 10th December 1916 he was moved back to the 38th Casualty Clearing Station.  On 11th December 1916 he was placed aboard the 5th Ambulance Train, for transfer to the 9th General Hospital at Rouen, France.

On 24th December 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Dunluce Castle at Le Harve, France, for evacuation to England, with Debility. Later that day he was admitted to the Cambridge Hospital at Aldershot, England.

On 18th January 1917 Private Attenborough was granted leave, to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England, on the 2nd of February 1917.

On 7th February 1917 Private Attenborough went before a Medical Board, where he was found to have Deafness, Senility and Rheumatism, and to be overage – he was recorded as being “58” years of age at his ‘last birthday’ on a Medical Report on an Invalid form in his service record. [If this stated age was actually correct, this may have made him the oldest Coo-ee to go overseas on active service]. Stated on the Medical Report on an Invalid dated 7th February 1917 in his service record was: ‘Has been somewhat deaf for years but in August while passing one of our own guns was deafened by its firing’.

On 12th February 1917 he was transferred to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 6th April he marched out from No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth for return to Australia.

On 4th May 1917 Private Attenborough departed England from Plymouth aboard the H.T. Themistocles for discharge. (Also being sent home on the same ship were Coo-ees James Birrell Dawson, Walter James Goodlet, and James McKeown).

Private Attenborough arrived in Sydney on 5th July 1917.

He was discharged medically unfit on 23rd August 1917.

 

Note: A letter in his service record dated 8th April 1921 shows that Louis Henry Attenborough had returned to England by this date, as it reported he was at that time residing at Fern Cottage, 90 Bath Road, Heston-Hounslow, Middlesex.

[1] ‘Blayney Recruits’, Leader , 29 October, 1915, p. 8. Retrieved December 17, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842821

 

John BRENNAN

John BRENNAN

Per his military service record (Depot), John Brennan was born at Brisbane. He gave his age as 32 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as dealer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 132 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and black & grey hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

John Brennan completed his medical examination on 26th October 1915 at Wellington (8 days after the Coo-ees had left through that town), then travelled to Blayney to catch up with the Coo-ees.  He was attested at Blayney by Captain Eade on 26th October 1915.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His address was recorded as ‘P.O. Geurie’ on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form .

It appears that John Brennan may have been one of the four unnamed men reported in the Wellington Times who signified their intention of joining the Coo-ee March at the appeal made at the Church of England Ball the night the Coo-ees stayed at Geurie on 15th October 1915.[1]

The Farmer and Settler reported that five men arrived to join the Coo-ees at Blayney on the 26th October 1915, by the late train from Geurie.[2]  The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate named ‘J. Brennan’ as one of four recruits from Geurie that caught the evening mail train at Wellington to join the Coo-ees at Blayney, (joining  A. Lynne [known as a Gilgandra recruit] and W. Smith, who had caught the train at Geurie).[3]

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 17th November 1915 Private Brennan went before a Medical Board at Liverpool Camp, where he was diagnosed to suffer from varicocele, and unfit for active service.

On 4th December 1915 Private Brennan was discharged from the A.I.F. as medically unfit.

[1] ‘Hitchen’s Coo-ees’, Wellington Times, 18 October 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388423

[2] ‘Gilgandra to the Coast : the “Snowball” growing as it rolls’, The Farmer and Settler, 29 October, 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116671286

[3] ‘Geurie’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 29 October 1915, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601626

 

Thomas ANDERSON

Thomas ANDERSON

Per his military service record (Depot), Thomas Anderson was born at Redfern, N.S.W. He gave his age as 34 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet and 8 inches tall, weight 154 lbs., with a fair complexion,[grey eyes], and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He gave his address as Roslyn Street, Mascot, N.S.W., on his initial Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form. He completed his medical on the 25th October 1915 at Wellington (7 days after the Coo-ees left), then travelled to catch up with the Coo-ees at Blayney, and was attested by Captain Eade at Blayney on 26th October 1916.

He was listed in The Bathurst Times as being one of the five Wellington recruits who joined the Coo-ees at Blayney. [1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 7th December 1915 Private Anderson, with fellow Coo-ee Private Denmead, while under the influence of liquor, were charged with begging alms in Campbell Street, Sydney, after they had ‘asked a military police officer for a “sprat” to get a drink’.[2] Along with Private Denmead, he appeared before the Central Police Court, and was sentenced to one hour’s imprisonment.

Private Anderson was charged with being absent without leave from 1st December 1915 to 12th December 1915, and as a result, on 14th December 1915 he was discharged as not likely to become an efficient soldier.

On 24th April 1916 Thomas Anderson re-enlisted at Bathurst, where he gave his occupation as miner, and went into Depot Camp at Bathurst. He was transferred to the 53rd Battalion on 26th April 1916. On 5th July 1916 he transferred to the Trench Mortar Battery at Menangle Park.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Portland, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed his sister, Mrs M. Cox, Roslyn Street, Mascot, Sydney, N.S.W.

ON 7th November 1916 Private Anderson embarked from Sydney with the 2nd reinforcements for the Light Trench Mortar Battery on the HMAT Ceramic A40, with regimental no. 1190.

He disembarked at Plymouth in England on 21 November 1916 for further training.

On 7th February 1917 he marched into the 4th Training Battalion at Codford in England.

On the 22nd February 1917 Private Anderson was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion.

On 27th February 1917 Private Anderson proceeded overseas from Folkstone to France, to reinforce the 13th Battalion.

On 1st March 1917 Private Anderson marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples in France. On 5th March 1917 he marched out of the 4th Australian Division Base Depot to join the 13th Battalion. On 6th March 1917 Private Anderson was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion whilst it was training at Ribemont in France.

Just over a month later, on 11th April 1917, the 13th Battalion was involved in an attack on the Hindenburg Line. During this attack Private Anderson was wounded in action, receiving a gunshot wound to his right hand. Private Anderson was evacuated to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station, then placed aboard the 11th Ambulance Train. On 13th April 1917 he was admitted to the 1st General Hospital.

On 19th April 1917 Private Anderson was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Londonderry at Rouen for evacuation to England. On 20th April 1917 he was admitted to the 1st Southern General Hospital at Birmingham, England.

On 12th June 1917 Private Anderson was discharged from hospital, and granted leave to report to the Number One Command Depot at Pernham Downs in England on 16th June 1917.

On 30th June 1917 Private Anderson was charged with being absent without leave from 3.30 pm on 26th June 917 until 8.20 pm on 27th June 1917. He was forfeited two days pay.

On 30th July 1917 Private Anderson was attached to the 9th Training Battalion at Durrington in England.

On 7th January 1918 Private Anderson was sent to the Number Two Command Depot at Weymouth in England.

On 10th March 1918 Private Anderson departed England to commence his return to Australia aboard the Durham Castle for discharge with ankylosis in his right thumb. His ship stopped at Cape Town in South Africa.

On 30th April 1918 he was charged at Cape Town with (1) Conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline in that he failed to be on board HT Orontes at sailing time 2 pm, the draft to which he belonged having embarked at 10.30 am, and (2) being absent without leave from 2 pm on 19th April 1918 until 8 pm on 21st April 1918, when he reported back. He was awarded 168 hours detention and fined 31 days pay. He also was absent without leave from 10 pm on 29th April 1918 to 4.30 pm on 3rd May 1918, and his sentence of 168 hours for this offence was concurrent with his awarded detention on 22nd April 1918.

On 4th May 1918 Private Anderson departed Cape Town aboard the HT Borda bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 1st June 1918, and was discharged medically unfit on 5th July 1918.

[1] ‘Western news’, The Bathurst Times, 27 October 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111244211

[2] ‘Begging Alms’, National Advocate, 10 December 1915, p. 5, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158151776

 

William Henry GRIFFITHS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5089), William Henry Griffiths was born at Waterloo Flat, Victoria. He gave his age as 33 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as engine driver. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 9 stone 10 lbs., with a fair complexion, hazel eyes, and auburn (dark) hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

William Griffiths was named in an article titled ‘Blayney recruits’ in the Leader as one of six men who have joined ‘as a result of the visit of the Coo-ees to Blayney’.[1] The Coo-ees had held a recruiting meeting and stayed overnight at Blayney on 26th October 1915.

He completed his medical examination at Orange on 1st November 1915, and was attested at at Orange on the same day.

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 18th February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave for two days, and he was fined ten shillings. On 21st February 1916 he was charged with being absent from parade, and he was fined five shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 2 Hambleton Street, Albert Park, Melbourne, Victoria, and his next of kin was listed as his father, E. R. Griffiths, at the same address.

An initial Regimental No. 4784 is crossed out on his Attestation Paper, and replaced with 5089. Private Griffiths departed Sydney on the HMAT A16 Star of Victoria A16 on 31st March 1916 with two other Coo-ees, as 16th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on the 8th May 1916.

On 7th June 1916 Private Griffiths left Alexandria aboard a transport ship bound for France, and he arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

He was sent to the 4th Division Base Depot at Etaples, France. He marched in and was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion on 21st July 1916, when it was training at Naours, France.

On 21st August 1916 Private Griffiths was sent to the 3rd Canadian General Hospital at Boulogne, France, suffering Nephrites.

On 25th August 1916 he was evacuated to England aboard the Hospital Ship Brighton. Later that day he was admitted to the Guildford War Hospital at Guildford, England.

On 20th November 1916 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England. On 2nd December 1916 he was discharged from Hospital, and sent to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 2nd January 1917 Private Griffiths was sent to the Infantry Drafting Depot at Pernham Downs, England. On 22nd July 1917 he departed Southampton, bound for France. He arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot on 24th July 1917. He departed the 4th Australian Division Base Depot on the 9th of August 1917, and rejoined the 13th Battalion on 11th August 1917, when it was conducting working parties in the vicinity of Neuve Eglise, Belgium.

On 25th September 1917 the 13th Battalion was manning the front line trenches in the vicinity of Westhoek, Belgium, when Private Griffiths was wounded in action, receiving a shrapnel wound to his chest. He was moved back to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance. On 27th September 1917 he was moved to the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station, where he was placed aboard the 24th Ambulance Train, and moved to the 7th Canadian General Hospital at Etaples, France.

On 10th October 1917 he was placed aboard the hospital Ship Lille De Liege and evacuated to England. He was admitted to the Royal Surrey War Hospital at Guildford in England later that day.

Private Griffiths was discharged from hospital on 29th November 1917, and granted leave to report to the Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on the 13th of December 1917.

On 18th January 1918 Private Griffiths was admitted to the Sutton Veny Military Hospital, suffering Bronchitis. He was discharged and sent back to the Number 1 Command Depot on 12th February 1918.

On 16th March 1918 Private Griffiths was transferred to the Australian Motor Transport Service as a cleaner.

His service record includes a certified extract of a marriage certificate for a marriage on 21st August 1918 between William Henry Griffiths (soldier) and Kathleen Spires at Christ Church, Chelsea, England.

On 31st January 1919 Private Griffiths marched into the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England, to commence his return to Australia. On 5th February 1919 he was transferred to the Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

Private Griffiths departed England on 2nd April 1919 for return to Australia with his wife, aboard the H.T. Benalla. He arrived in Australia on 5th May 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 15th November 1919.

[1] ‘Blayney recruits’, Leader, 29 October 1915, p. 8, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842821

Leo Ambrose STINSON

Leo Ambrose STINSON

Per his military service record (Depot), Leo Ambrose Stinson was born at Boomey, near the town of Wellington, N.S.W. He gave his age as 18 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as storeman. His description on his medical was height 6 feet and ½ inch tall, weight 9 stone 7 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 22nd October 1915 at Gilgandra (12 days after the Coo-ees left), then caught up with the Coo-ees, and was attested at Blayney by Captain Eade on the 26th October 1915 (when the Coo-ees were at Blayney).

Leo Stinson was the recruit who joined the Coo-ees at Blayney from Gilgandra by train that was reported in the The Farmer and Settler, 29 October, 1915, p. 3.[1]

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp into D Coy 5th Battalion.

Following a further medical examination before the Medical Board on 17th November 1915 after arriving at Liverpool Camp with the Coo-ees, Private Stinson was discharged on the 29th of November 1915 as medically unfit, with deficient chest measurement.

On 18th March 1916 Leo Stinson re-enlisted at Dubbo, where he passed his medical and was attested. After some training he embarked from Sydney on 9th September 1916 as 15th reinforcement for the 20th Battalion on the HMAT A14 Euripides. He was given regimental no. 5644.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Miller Street, Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed his father, John Nicholas Stinson, Rydal, N.S.W.

He arrived at Plymouth in England on 26th October 1916.

Private Stinson trained in England until 13th December 1916, when he was sent to Etaples in France. He joined the Battalion in France on 26th January 1917.

On the 15/16th of April 1917 a German attack broke through the front line near Lagnicourt in France and the guns of the 2nd Australian Field Artillery Brigade were captured. The 20th Battalion was involved in the counterattack that recaptured the guns and forced the Germans back to their lines. Over 200 Germans were captured by the Battalion in this operation. Six members of the Battalion were killed, and were 16 wounded, including Private Stinson, who received a gunshot wound to his back and another to his right arm. Private Stinson was evacuated to the 9th Casualty Clearing Station, then admitted to the 10th General Hospital in Rouen on 17th April 1917. He was then sent to England on 29th April 1917, and was admitted to the 5th Southern General Hospital on 30th April 1917.

On 7th July 1917 Private Simpson was discharged from the 5th Southern General Hospital to No. 1 Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield.

On 26th September 1917 Private Stinson left England on the HMAT Borda bound for Australia. He arrived in Melbourne on 25th November 1917, and was discharged as medically unfit on 4th January 1918.

On 22nd July 1919 Private Stinson re-enlisted in the Special Service AIF (regimental no. 86082), and on 12th August 1919 he departed Sydney bound for Europe as an escort for deportees being sent to Europe. He arrived at London on 12th October 1919. On 5th December 1919 Private Stinson commenced his return to Australia, arriving on 23rd January 1920. He was discharged on 7th February 1920.

Leo Stinson also enlisted in the AIF in the Second World War.

[1] ‘Great Route March. Gilgandra to the Coast’, ’, The Farmer and Settler, 29 October 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/n la.news-article116671286

 

 

John TARLINGTON

John TARLINGTON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4605), John Tarlington was born at Glen Innes, N.S.W. He gave his age as 38 years and 7 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 11 stone 5 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.

On his attestation paper dated 26th October 1915, John Tarlington claimed previous service of 10 months in South Africa during the Boer War with the New South Wales Mounted Infantry, and 2 months previous service with the 18th Battalion.

John Tarlington had enlisted previously in the AIF on 20th May 1915 (with regimental no. 727) and completed two months training before being discharged at his wife’s request on 8th July 1915. Noted on this previous attestation paper dated 20th May 1915 was that at he had ‘Served 13th Battalion Discharged for breaking leave’. According to a statement in his service record that John Tarlington had made at the time of his 20th May 1915 enlistment, as he was unable to produce a discharge certificate for his previous service, he had enlisted about the ‘middle of November 1914 and was pooled’ to the 13th Battalion, from which he had been ‘discharged the day before embarkation on a charge of “Overstaying leave”’. He was ‘granted 24 hours leave, & returned to camp about 24 hours late, owing to severe illness’ of his wife, and on his return he was told his ‘place had been filled’ on account of his absence , and he was ‘then ordered off the ground by one of the Military Police’.

John Tarlington was in the process of applying to re-enlist in the AIF for the third time before he joined up with the Coo-ees at Blayney. On his initial Application to enlist form in his service record dated 11th October 1915 at Lithgow, John Tarlington gave his address as Coombing Park, Carcoar, N.S.W.  A letter in his service record stated that he would present himself on the 26th October after he had given two week’s notice to his employer. It appears he presented himself to the Coo-ee March at Blayney on the 26th October, instead of returning to Lithgow to enlist.

He completed his medical examination on the 26th October 1915 at Blayney, and was attested by Captain Eade at Blayney on 26th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Guildford Road, Guildford, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs. S. [Susan] Tarlington, Guildford Road, Guildford , N.S.W.

Private Tarlington departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat on 16th February 1916. He arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916. On 1st April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post, Egypt.

On 14th April 1916 Private Tarlington reported to the 14th Field ambulance sick, and he was sent to the 2nd Casualty Clearing Station, then to the Number 1 Australian Stationary Hospital at Ismalia, Egypt. The next day 15th April 1916 Private Tarlington was admitted to the 1st Dermatological Hospital at Abassia, Egypt. He was discharged on 21st April 1916.

On 23rd May 1916 Private Tarilington was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

Private Tarlington left Alexandria on 6th June 1916 aboard the Transport Ionian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 15th June 1916. He went to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France. On 21st June 1916 he departed Etaples and joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion the next day on 22nd June 1916 when it was at Armentieres, France constructing defensive works.

On 6th August 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was maintaining Tramway Trench in the ruins of the village of Pozieres which was under heavy German artillery fire during the Battle of Pozieres when Private Tarlington was killed in action. Also killed with him in the 4th Pioneer Battalion on the same day were fellow Coo-ees Oliver James Harmon (who joined the Coo-ees at Parramatta), and Karl Alex Frederick Neilson (who joined the Coo-ees at Springwood).

According to his Red Cross Wounded and Missing report, Private Tarlington was killed by a shell as ‘he got on the top of the trench at Pozieres to allow some wounded men to pass along the trench’, and he was buried ‘afterwards just over the parapet of the trench’, and ‘the grave was not marked’.[1]

Private Tarlington has no known grave, and is remembered on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial in France. He left a widow and a son.

Private Tarlington's name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Tarlington’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Tarlington’s name is commemorated on panel 174 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Private Tarlington’s name is also remembered on the Guildford Soldiers Memorial at the Soldiers Memorial School of Arts Hall at Guildford.

[1] ‘4605 Private John Tarlington’, Red Cross Wounded and Missing Enquiry Bureau Files, 1914-1918 War 1DRL/0428, http://static.awm.gov.au/images/collection/pdf/RCDIG1059988–1-.pdf

 

Archibald MCINTYRE

Archibald MCINTYRE

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2708), Archibald McIntyre enlisted twice in the AIF. Archibald McIntyre was born at Glasgow, Scotland. On his first enlistment (during the Coo-ee March), he gave his age as 31 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 2 inches tall, weight 9 stone 10 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 26th October 1915 at Blayney, and was attested by Captain Eade at Blayney on the 26th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Whilst at Liverpool Camp Private McIntyre went before a medical board on 17th November 1915 where he was deemed unfit for military service due to defective vision. He was discharged on the 29th November 1915.

In a letter dated 16th April 1916 Archibald McIntyre wrote “I was rejected for eyesight but as they have reduced the test I intend to give it another try”.[1]

On the 19th May 1916 Archibald McIntyre applied again to join the AIF. He attended the Royal Agricultural Showground in Sydney, and stated in this application that he had 35 days previous military service in the AIF, and was rejected on grounds of eyesight. He underwent a medical on the 19th May 1916 which he passed. He was attested on the 20th May 1916 at the Royal Agricultural Showground.

Private McIntyre went into camp and began training at Cootamundra on the 23rd May 1916, then to Goulburn on the 22nd June 1916. He remained at Goulburn till the 4th September 1916 when he was transferred to the 56th Battalion and went to Sydney being taken on strength of the 6th reinforcements for the Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Portland N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as father, William McIntyre, 161 Pollok Street, Glasgow, Scotland.

Private McIntyre departed Sydney on the HMAT A40 Ceramic on the 7th October 1916. He arrived in Plymouth, England, on the 21st November 1916. After further training in England he departed Folkestone, England, aboard the SS Princess Victoria for France on the 21st December 1916. He underwent further training in France at the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples. He joined the 56th Battalion on 1st February 1917 whilst it was in reserve and providing fatigue parties at Bernafay south of Pozieres, France.

On the 22nd March 1917 the 56th Battalion was in reserve in the vicinity of Bancourt, France, when Private McIntyre was evacuated to hospital sick. On the 24th March 1917 he was diagnosed to be suffering from Bronchitis. On the 25th March at the 2nd/1st South Midland Casualty Clearing Station Private McIntyre was diagnosed with Cerebro Spinal Meningitis. He died the next day.

Private McIntyre was buried in the Puchevillers British Cemetery, France, on 26th March 1917.

Archibald McIntyre's headstone at Puchervillers British Cemetery, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson 5/9/2014)

Archibald McIntyre’s headstone at Puchevillers British Cemetery, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson 5/9/2014)

Private McIntyre’s name is commemorated on panel 162 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Note: Archibald McIntyre’s father wrote on his Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour Circular that he came to Australia when he was 22, and that he ‘sailed round world once or twice as a sea apprentice in a sailing ship. Traded from Australia to New Zealand for a time. Joined in the Coo-ee March. Two brothers in British Army (one killed).’[2]

[1] McIntyre, Archibald. Letter to [A. H. Miller], 16th April 1916, Alex Halden (Joe) Miller papers mainly relating to the Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March, New South Wales, 1912-1921, 1939, held at the Mitchell Library (State Library of N.S.W.)

[2] Archibald McIntyre 2708 Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour Circular, http://static.awm.gov.au/images/collection/pdf/RCDIG1068881–64-.PDF