Tag Archives: Springwood recruits

Thomas William HASKETT

Thomas William HASKETT

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4793), Thomas William Haskett was born at Manuhull, Dorsetshire, [England].[1]  He gave his age as 43 years and 5 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 140 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had 1 years previous military service in the 3rd Battalion of the Dorset Regiment.

He was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway at Springwood, but there is an anomaly with the date of his attestation on his Attestation Paper of Persons Listed for Service Abroad.  The date on the Certificate of Attesting Officer section of his Attestation Paper was originally recorded as 9th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Springwood to Penrith), but this date has been changed on the form to 5th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Mount Victoria to Katoomba).  The Oath to be taken by person being enlisted section is dated from 5th November 1915.

His “Joined on” date on his Attestation Paper was recorded as 5th November 1915, so it appears he may possibly have joined the Coo-ee March somewhere in the Blue Mountains before they arrived at Springwood.  He lived at Wentworth Falls, and was employed by Blue Mountains Shire Council on one of the shire gangs at the time he joined the Coo-ee March.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Ashfield on 11th November 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Bathurst Road, Wentworth Falls, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs A. [Annie] Haskett, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Haskett, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Haskett left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Haskett served with the 45th Battalion in France until 31st August 1916, when he was sent to the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station suffering from ‘Oedema of penus’.  He was placed aboard the 28th Ambulance Train and admitted to the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital at Boulogne, France, later that day.

He was later placed aboard the Hospital Ship St Dennis in Boulogne Harbour for evacuation to England.

After arrival in England, on 31st January 1917 he was admitted to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England, with odema nephritis.

On 23rd March 1917 Private Haskett was discharged from hospital, and granted leave to report back on 7th April 1917.  He then marched into the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England, on 9th April 1917.

On 4th May 1917 Private Haskett departed Devonport, England, bound for Australia aboard the H.T. Miltiades for medical discharge (chronic nephritis).

He arrived in Australia on 5th July 1917.

The Lithgow Mercury reported that a concert and dance was held at Wentworth Falls to welcome home Private T. W. Haskett (and send off several other soldiers) in August 1917.[3]

Private Haskett was discharged Medically Unfit on 4th October 1917.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, HASKETT T W

[2] ‘Wentworth Falls’, Lithgow Mercury, 7 February 1916, p. 3. Retrieved April 16, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218728295

[3] ‘Wentworth Falls’, Lithgow Mercury, 31 August 1917, p. 3. Retrieved April 16, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218767520

 

 

John Graham WATSON

John Graham WATSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4909), John Graham Watson was born at Katoomba, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 25 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 9 ½ inches tall, weight 162 lbs., with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and medium hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He appears to have mistakenly been named as ‘W. Watson’ in The Blue Mountain Echo as one of ‘the lads who answered the call, and marched out with the Coo-ees’ at Katoomba.[2]

He was attested at Springwood by Lieutenant F. Middenway on 8th November 1915 (when the Coo-ees were at Springwood), but did not complete his medical examination until 15th November 1915 at Liverpool.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Bent Street, Katoomba, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his sister, Miss E. [Elsie] A. Watson, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Watson, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 7th June 1916 Private Watson left Alexandria aboard the Transport Ionian bound for France, and he arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

Private Watson marched into the 13th Battalion on 19th August 1916 when it was resting and reorganising at Pernois, France.  (Fellow Coo-ee William Stirling Mason from Katoomba had joined the 13th Battalion in France on the same day).

A letter home from another Katoomba soldier, Reg. Duff, dated 15th September 1916, that was published in The Blue Mountain Echo, reported that ‘Snowy Mason and Jack Watson have joined the 13th Battalion’.[3]

On 10th October 1916 Private Watson was promoted to Lance Corporal in the field, in Belgium.

On 21st January 1917 he was promoted to Temporary Corporal.

On 4th February 1917 the 13th Battalion successfully attacked the German Front Line trenches near the village of Guedecourt, France.  During this attack T/Corporal Watson was wounded in action, receiving a gunshot wound to his right leg. (William Stirling Mason was also wounded in action with shrapnel wounds on the same day).  T/Corporal Watson was evacuated and admitted to the 10th General Hospital at Rouen, France, on 7th February 1917.  He also on this date reverted to the rank of Lance Corporal, on being wounded.

On 11th February 1917 Lance Corporal Watson was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Aberdonian for evacuation to England.  On 13th February 1917 he was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth.

On 2nd April 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England with a gunshot wound to his right foot.  He was discharged on 9th April 1917, and sent to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 3rd May 1917 Lance Corporal Watson was admitted sick to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England.  He was discharged on 21st June 1917, and returned to the Number 2 Command Depot.

On 29th of June 1917 Lance Corporal Watson was transferred to the Number 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.  Soon after he was the sent to the Overseas Training Brigade at Perham Downs.

On 13th August 1917 he departed Southampton bound for France.  On 14th August 1917 he arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve.

On 16th of August 1917 Lance Corporal Watson was admitted to the 39th General Hospital sick.  He was discharged and sent back to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot on 24th August 1917.

On 1st September 1917 he marched into the 13th Battalion when it was resting and reorganising at Verte Rue in France.

On 24th October 1917 Lance Corporal Watson was with the 13th Battalion when it was preparing to move from Ypres to Rheninghelst in Belgium, when he was sent to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance with gas poisoning, then moved back to the 17th Casualty Clearing Station.  On 26th October 1917 he was admitted to the 9th General Hospital at Rouen, France.  On 6th November 1917 he was placed aboard a hospital ship for evacuation to England.  On 7thth November 1917 he was admitted to the Winchester Military Hospital with severe gas poisoning.

On 7th February 1918 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 16th March 1918 Lance Corporal Watson departed England aboard the Transport Kanowna bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 25th May 1918, and was discharged Medically Unfit on 26th July 1918.

[1] NAA: B2455, WATSON J G

[2] ‘March over the Mountains’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 12 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved September 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142

[3] ‘The Soldiers’ Mailbag’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 10 November 1916, p. 1. Retrieved February 22, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042760

 

William Stirling MASON

William Stirling MASON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4839), William Stirling Mason was born at ‘Eketahana’ [i.e. Eketahuna], New Zealand.[1]  His middle name of “Stirling” is spelt “Sterling”on some sections of his service record, but it is spelt as “Stirling” in his signature.  He gave his age as 21 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 8 stone 12 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and light brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had 12 months service in the Senior Cadets in New Zealand and he had been rejected for the AIF in the past for chest measurement.

The Blue Mountain Echo named ‘W. Mason’ as one of ‘the lads who answered the call, and marched out with the Coo-ees’ at Katoomba.[2]

He was attested at Springwood on 9th November 1915, and completed his medical examination on 9th November 1915 at Penrith, N.S.W.  (The Coo-ees had travelled from Springwood to Penrith on 9th November 1915).

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Waratah Street, Katoomba, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, W. [Walter] Mason, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Mason, along with many of the other Coo-ee,s departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

It is not recorded when Private Mason departed Egypt, but he ended up in the 4th Training battalion in England.

On 30th July 1916 Private Mason departed Rollerstone in England bound for France.  He marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples on 1st August 1916.

He joined the 13th Battalion on 19th August 1916 when it was resting and reorganising at Pernois, France.

On 4th February 1917 the 13th Battalion successfully attacked the German Front Line trenches near the village of Guedecourt, France.  During this attack Private Mason was wounded in action. receiving multiple shrapnel wounds to his right arm.  He was evacuated and admitted to the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital at Boulogne, France on 7th February 1917.

On 9th of February 1917 Private Mason was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Princess Elizabeth in Boulogne Harbour for evacuation to England.

On 10th February 1917 he was admitted to the Norfolk War Hospital.

Private Mason was discharged on 5th March 1917, and granted leave to report to the Number 4 Command Depot at Wareham, England, on 21st March 1917.

On 3rd April 1917 Private Mason was admitted to the Military Hospital at Wareham with measles.

On 12th April 1917 he was moved to the 16th Field Ambulance at Woolwich, then was admitted to the Woolwich Military Hospital later that day.  He was discharged and sent back to the Number 4 Command Depot on 21st April 1917.

On 27th April 1917 Private Mason was transferred to the newly formed 63rd Battalion at Pernham Downs (which was later disbanded on 19th October 1917).

On 12th September 1917 Private Mason departed Southampton bound for France, to reinforce the 13th Battalion.  He arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve on 13th September 1917.

On 21st September 1917 he departed the 4th Australian Division Base depot to rejoin the 13th Battalion.  On 30th September 1917 he marched into the 13th Battalion, when it was in the Steenvoorde area in northern France.

Two weeks later, on 16th October 1917, Private Mason was with the 13th Battalion manning the support line in the vicinity of Zonnebeke, Belgium, when he was wounded in action by Mustard Gas.  He was sent to the 11th Australian Field Ambulance with a blistered head, then moved back to the 3rd Australian Clearing Station.  He was placed aboard the 26th Ambulance Train and on 19th October 1917 he was admitted to the 3rd Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France.

On 22nd October 1917 he was placed aboard Hospital Ship Grantully Castle for evacuation to England.  On 24th October 1917 he was admitted to the Queen Mary Military Hospital at Whalley in Lancashire.

On 16th November 1917 Private Mason was discharged from hospital, and granted leave to report to the Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 30th November 1917.

On 2nd January 1918 Private Mason marched into the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge, England from Number 1 Command Depot.

On 23rd January 1918 Private Mason departed Southampton bound for France.  He arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve on  24th January 1918.

On 26th January 1918 Private Mason departed the 4th Australian Division Base depot to rejoin the 13th Battalion.  On 30th January 1918 he marched into the Battalion when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Hollebeke, Belgium.

On the 1st of March 1918 Private Mason was with the 13th Battalion being relieved by the 10th Battalion from the support lines when the enemy launched a trench raid. Private Mason’s company was caught in the enemy barrage and 5 men were killed, and 5 wounded, including Private Mason, who sustained a shrapnel wound to his forehead and another to his right hand.  Both were minor. He was sent to the 1st Australian Field Ambulance.  He was treated and rejoined the Battalion the next day.

On 13th of November 1918 Private Mason was granted leave from France to England until 28th November 1918.

While on leave in England, on 17th November 1918 was admitted to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England, suffering Bronchitis.  This was reported as ‘Influenza seriously ill’ on 20th November 1918.

Private Mason was discharged on 6th of December 1918 and granted leave to report back to the Hospital at Harefield on  11th December 1918.  He was discharged on 14th December 1918, and sent to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 18th January 1919 Private Mason departed England aboard the H.M.A.T. Ulysses bound for Australia.  He arrived in Australia on 15th March 1919.

The Blue Mountain Echo reported that Private ‘Will Mason’, along with other returning local soldiers, was presented with a smoker’s outfit at a welcome home function held at the Katoomba Town Hall on 31st March 1919.[3]

Private Mason was discharged Medically Unfit on 1st May 1919.

[1] NAA: B2455, MASON WILLIAM STIRLING

[2] ‘March over the Mountains’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 12 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved September 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142  [on page 3]

[3] ‘A Royal Welcome. Katoomba’s Heroes Received. A Memorable Evening’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 4 April 1919, p. 1. Retrieved February 19, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108245995

 

Arthur Ernest MCGREGOR

Arthur Ernest MCGREGOR

Arthur Ernest McGregor (Daily Telegraph 22/9/1916)

Arthur Ernest McGregor (Daily Telegraph 22/9/1916)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 10156), Arthur Ernest McGregor was born at Newtown, N.S.W. He gave his age as 31 years, his marital status as married, and his occupation as baker. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 10 stone, with a dark complexion, dark blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He as attested at Springwood on the 5th November, 1915, then completed his medical at Springwood on the 8th November 1915. The Coo-ees were in Springwood on the night of the 8th November 1915, where they gained 5 recruits, and this date was listed as the “joined on” date on his attestation paper, and also on his embarkation nominal roll.

His older brother Andrew James McGregor was already a recruit on the march, having joined the Coo-ees at the start at Gilgandra. He too was a baker, who had sold his business in Gilgandra to join the Coo-ees.

After completing the march Andrew James McGregor went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion until 18th February 1916, when he transferred to the 6th Reinforcements for 19th Army Service Corps Company 2nd Field Bakery.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 10 Fairmount Street, Petersham N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his Aunt, Mrs. B. H. Campbell, at the same address.

On 5th May 1916 Private McGregor departed Sydney on the HMAT Karroo A10, arriving in Egypt on the 7th June 1916.

On the 10th July 1916 he embarked for Marseilles on the transport Tunisean, arriving on 16th July 1916. He marched into 2nd Division B Depot at Etaples on 19th July 1916.

On the 29th July 1916 he was taken on strength as reinforcement to the 2nd Field Bakery at Calais.

On 21st November he was admitted to hospital sick, and evacuated to England on 5th December 1916. He was admitted to the 3rd Auxiliary Hospital in England on 14th December 1915. He was discharged to Perham Downs on furlough from 29th December 1916 to 13th January 1917.

On 30th January 1917 he marched in from No. 1 Command Depot to R.S.C. Training Depot at Parkhouse. He proceeded overseas with A.S.C. reinforcements from Folkstone on 25th February 1917, and marched into No. 2 Base Supply Depot at Etaples on 27th February 1917. On 30th March 1917 he was posted to the 2nd Field Bakery at Rouen.

On 8th July 1917 he proceeded on leave to the United Kingdom.  He rejoined his unit in France on 19th July 1917.

He went on leave again to the UK from 12th September 1918 to 26th September 1918.

On 12th December 1918 he went to hospital at Rouen sick, then was discharged to duty on 14th December 1918.

On 12th March 1919 he left Havre in France for England.

He was granted leave from 9th April 1919 to 9th September 1919 to make confectionary in London (non military employment), however this leave was cancelled on 12th June 1919, and he returned to 2nd Field Bakery on 8th July 1919.

He began his return to Australia on HT Persic on 13th July 1919, arriving in Australia on 2nd September 1919. He was discharged on 1st February 1920.

Karl Alex Frederick NIELSON

Karl Alex Frederick NIELSON

Per his Application for Certificate of Naturalization dated 4th September 1915, under the name Karl Axel Frederik Nielsen, he was born on 19th December 1890 at Nestved, Sjaelland, Denmark, and arrived in Newcastle, Australia, from the United States of America on 15th April 1913, on the Canada Cape.[1] Per a letter in this file dated 29th August 1915 he applied to be naturalized so he could be eligible to enlist to join a “mate” who had already enlisted.

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4865), Karl Alex Frederick Nielson was born at Sjelland, Denmark. He gave his age as 24 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as Bushman. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, with a ruddy complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service. Although he did not complete his medical examination until 13th November 1915 at Liverpool, and was attested at Liverpool on the 13th November 1915, his date of joining on the nominal roll was recorded as the 8th November 1915, when the Coo-ees were on their way from Lawson to Springwood. Per The Blue Mountains Echo he was one of three recruits to join the Coo-es from Hazelbrook.[2]

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll he is named as Karl Axle Nielson, and his address at time of enrolment was C/- Mrs. Hook, Wentworth Falls, Blue Mountains, N.S.W. His next of kin is listed as Mrs D. [i.e. E.] Hook, Wentworth Falls, Blue Mountains, N.S.W.

Mrs [Ellen] Hook described him in a letter dated 4th December 1921 in his service record as “a mate of my son [Augustus “Gus” James Hook, who had joined the AIF on 26th August 1915] and always made my place his home long before he enlisted”.

On 8th March 1916 Private Nielson along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Nielson was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 6th May 1916 Private Nielson was admitted to the 54th Casualty Clearing Station at Serapeum, Egypt, with an illness Not Yet Diagnosed. That same day he was transferred to the 12th Field Ambulance. On 22nd May 1916 Private Nielson was discharged and returned to his unit

On 4th June 1916 Private Nielson left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 15th July 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was at Canaples, France, conducting training. On this day Private Nielson was charged with Conduct to the Prejudice of Good Order and Military Discipline in that he while on Parade replied in an insubordinate manner to NCO who was instructing Parade. He was awarded one day Field Punishment Number 2.

On 6th August 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was maintaining Tramway Trench in the ruins of the village of Pozieres which was under heavy German artillery fire during the Battle of Pozieres when Private Nielson was killed in action. Also killed with him in the 4th Pioneer Battalion on the same day were fellow Coo-ees Oliver James Harmon (who joined the Coo-ee March at Parramatta), and John Tarlington (who joined at Blayney).

An entry in Private Nielson’s service record notes that he was ‘Believed buried at Copse Avenue Pozieres’. However his body was not able to be located.

Private Nielson is remembered on the Australian National Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux in France.

Private Nielson's name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Nielson’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Nielson’s name is commemorated on panel 114 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour. His place of association is Hazelbrook.

Hi name is also remembered on the Wentworth Falls War Memorial.

[1] Karl Axel Frederik Nielsen, Hazelbrook, Labourer, ‘Application for Certificate of Naturalization’, stamped 17 September 1915, http://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/scripts/Imagine.asp?B=33454

[2] ‘Hazelbrook’, The Blue Mountain Echo , 19 November 1915, p. 6, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108047454. Note: named as “Harry Neilsen”, and “An earlier recruit, Mr. Gus Hook, was also present”.

 

David James WAGNER

David James WAGNER

David James Wagner (Photograph courtesy of his grand-daughter Anne Dollin)

David James Wagner (Photograph courtesy of his grand-daughter Anne Dollin)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4911), David James Wagner was born at Marrickville, Sydney, N.S.W. He gave his age as 18 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as Bread Carter. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 ½ inches tall, weight 8 stone 1 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed to have no previous military experience. It was noted on his enlistment form that he had been rejected previously by the Australian Imperial Force due to a deficient chest measurement. He completed his medical, and was attested on the same day, at Springwood on the 8th November 1915. He was one of two local recruits who joined the Coo-ees at Springwood.

Although Dave Wagner’s age was recorded as 18 years of age on his enlistment papers, he was actually only 16 years and 10 months old at the time, and was one of the youngest of the Coo-ees to enlist.[1] His service record contains a consent form signed by his father Arthur Wagner.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Nancy [sic] Heights, Blue Mountains, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, W. [sic] Wagner, Nancy Heights, Blue Mountains, N.S.W. [Nancy Heights should have been recorded as Valley Heights, Blue Mountains, N.S.W.]

Along with many of the Coo-ees, Private Wagner departed Sydney on the HMAT Star of England on the 8th March 1916. He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916. On the 19th April 1916 he transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Wagner left Alexandria aboard the Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseille on the 8th June 1916.

On the 6th July 1916 Private Wagner was shot in the chest while he was with the 45th Battalion when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Sailly Sur La Lys, France. He was evacuated to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance at Fort Rompu near Erquinghem, then on the 7th July 1916 to the 2nd Australian Casualty Clearance Station at Trois Arbres. On the 13th August 1916 he was transferred to the 32nd Stationary Hospital at Wimereux. On the 15th August 1916 he was moved to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples.

On the 11th September 1916 Private Wagner rejoined the 45th Battalion when they were training and refitting at Victoria Camp near Renninghelst, Belgium.

On the 7th June 1917 Private Wagner was admitted to Hospital sick. He rejoined the Battalion on the 13th June 1917.

On the 14th August 1917 Private Wagner was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance with diarrhoea. He rejoined the Battalion on the 22nd of August 1917.

On the 31st May 1918 Private Wagner was detached to the Headquarters of the 12th Infantry Brigade. On the 29th January 1919 Private Wagner returned to the 45th Battalion.

On the 4th February 1919 he was sent to the 39th Stationary Hospital at Le Harve, France. On the 7th February 1919 Private Wagner was admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England sick. He was discharged from Hospital on the 15th March 1919. Then on the 20th March 1919 Private Wagner was readmitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital sick. He was discharged on the 21st April 1919.

Private Wagner commenced his return to Australia on the 12th May 1919 aboard the Port Napier, arriving in Australia on the 5th July 1919. He was discharged on the 19th August 1919.

The Blue Mountains Echo reported on 5th September 1919 that at a recent welcome home event held for four returned soldiers at Springood Hall that the chairman called Private Wagner ‘Springwood’s “Coo-ee’’’ whom ‘everybody knew as “Our Davy”’’, and that Private Wagner when he spoke ‘paid tribute to the Women’s Sewing Circle, “Let me tell you,” he said, “that the things they sent to the fighters were greatly appreciated. I am glad to be home; but when I was away I can tell you I looked for the letters which helped me to keep in touch with the home folk”’.[2]

[1] ‘The talk of the town’, The Mirror of Australia, 2 September 1916, p. 2, http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/105136203

[2] ‘Springwood’s soldier sons’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 5 September 1919, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108245547