Category Archives: Roll of honour

1987 and 2015 Coo-ee March Re-enactments Reunion and unveiling of Coo-ee March Roll of Honour Plaque

1987 and 2015 Coo-ee March Re-enactments Reunion and unveiling of Coo-ee March Roll of Honour Plaque

Marchers from the 1987 and 2015 Coo-ee March Re-enactments met in Gilgandra for a special reunion over the October Long Weekend, in memory of the 1915 Coo-ees, and to mark the 30th Anniversary of the 1987 Coo-ee March Re-enactment.

Around 40 former marchers and support people gathered at the Tattersalls Hotel in Gilgandra on Friday evening, 29th September 2017, to begin the weekend’s activities.

The main event was a street parade by the marchers on Saturday morning 30th September 2017 from Bridge Street along Miller Street (the main street), then, after a short stop for reflection at the Gilgandra War Memorial wall, the marchers marched along the Windmill Walk along the Castlereagh River to the Coo-ee March Memorial Gateway at the Coo-ee Heritage Centre, for a commemorative service.

Marchers formed up at Cairn in Bridge Street, Gilgandra, 30/9/2017 (Photograph courtesy John Tibben)

The marchers formed up to begin the parade at the commemorative Cairn in Bridge Street at 10.45 am for a welcome by Gilgandra Shire Council Acting Mayor Ashley Walker.

This Cairn marks the spot where the Gilgandra to Sydney Coo-ee Recruitment March started 102 years ago, on 10th October 1915.

50 years later, in 1965 seven of the original Coo-ees reunited in Gilgandra, to unveil this commemorative Cairn.

The 1987 Coo-ee March Re-enactment and the 2015 Coo-ee March Re-enactment both started at this commemorative Cairn.

Parade along Miller Street, Gilgandra 30/9/2017 (Photograph courtesy of John Tibben)

Marchers stopped at Gilgandra War Memorial 30/9/2017 (Photograph courtesy of John Tibben)

Marchers on Windmill Walk next to the Castlereagh River Gilgandra 30/9/2017 (Photograph courtesy of John Tibben)

At the commemorative service held at the Coo-ee March Memorial Gateway, the names of the 35 Gilgandra Coo-ees were read out by Coo-ee descendant  and 2015 Coo-ee March Re-enactment marcher Deborah Hitchen, and 2015 marchers Eric McCutcheon and Paul Mann.

A Coo-ee March Roll of Honour plaque, listing the name of the 41 Coo-ees who died while on active service overseas during the First World War, was then unveiled.

Unveiling of the Coo-ee March Roll of Honour plaque at Gilgandra 30/9/2017 (Photograph courtesy of John Tibben)

The plaque was prepared by Coo-ee March 2015 Inc. (Gilgandra Sub-Committee) in memory of the 41 fallen Coo-ees.  It was unveiled by Gilgandra Shire Council Acting Mayor Ashley Walker, Gilgandra Historical Society President Graeme Purvis, Brian Bywater OAM, one of the organisers of both the 1987 and 2015 Coo-ee March Re-enactments, and President of Coo-ee March 2015 Inc., and myself (Helen Thompson, Researcher for Coo-ee March 2015 Inc. (Gilgandra Sub-Committee).

Coo-ee March Roll of Honour plaque (Photograph courtesy of John Tibben)

The plaque was blessed by 2015 marcher and local Anglican minister, Father Grahame Yager.

It was very moving when the MC Richard Salcole read out the names of the 41 fallen Coo-ees, and each marcher present from the 1987 and 2015 Re-enactments moved forward to lay a poppy in bowls of sand that were placed with the wreaths in remembrance of these men, as each name was read.

Plaque, wreaths, and poppies at Gilgandra 30/9/2017 (Photograph courtesy of John Tibben)

The red poppy wreath with the purple Coo-ee March 1915-2015 ribbon on it travelled with Stephen and me when we visited the graves of the fallen Coo-ees, or the memorials where their names are remembered, in France, Belgium and England last year.

1902 British Military Saddle donated by Major Stewart Thompson to Giglandra Museum and Historical Society (Photograph courtesy of John Tibben)

This 1902 British Military Saddle, accompanied by an 1898 replica pattern bridle, on display at the service, was the type of saddle used by the Australian Light Horse during the First World War.  It was donated to the Gilgandra Museum and Historical Society during the service. This saddle was used by Major Stewart Thompson (retired) OAM when he accompanied the marchers on his horse as an Australian Light Horse re-enactor on the 1987 Coo-ee March Re-enactment.

After the commemorative service, the marchers adjourned to the Gilgandra Bowling Club for a BBQ lunch. It was a great day to remember the 1915 Coo-ees, and catch up with the 1987 and 2015 marchers.

A special service was held at St Ambrose Church in Gilgandra, in memory of the Coo-ees, on Sunday morning 1st October, 2017.

The names of the 41 Coo-ees who died while on active service overseas during the First World War. Information about the 41 Coo-ees who died while on active service overseas during the First World War can be found on this website on the Honour Roll page https://cooeemarch1915.com/honour-roll/

Stanley Everard STEPHENS

Stanley Everard STEPHENS

Stanley Everard Stephens (Photograph courtesy of M. Stephens)

Stanley Everard Stephens (Photograph courtesy of M. Stephens)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 6320), Stanley Everard Stephens was born at Melbourne, Victoria. He gave his age as 24 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as journalist. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 136 lbs., with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to have previous military service with the Naval Reserve and the New Guinea Expeditionary Force. He completed his medical on the 9th October 1915 at Gilgandra (the day before the commencement of the Coo-ee March), and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Gilgandra on the 9th October 1915.

Stanley Stephens joined the Coo-ee March as both a recruit, and as a special reporter to The Farmer and Settler, of which his father Harry J. Stephens was the editor.

On the march he was given the rank of Acting Sergeant, and was appointed Secretary of the travelling committee of control appointed for the Coo-ee March at Stuart Town, with Major Wynne as chairman, Captain Hitchen, Q.M.S. Lee, and Mr H. T. Blacket, during a visit by A. H. Miller (Secretary), and C. H. Richards and P. J. MacManus, from the Gilgandra Recruiting Committee.[1] In this role he assisted with the day to day running of the march, and maintained the accounts.[2]

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. He was made Acting Company Sergeant Major on 16th November 2015.

On 7th February 1916 Acting Company Sergeant Major Stephens was sent to the Depot School for NCO’s, then on 18th March 1916 he was sent to the Officer School at Duntroon.

His father Harry Stephens wrote in a letter to A. H. Miller (Secretary of the Gilgandra Recruiting Committee) dated 9th March 1916 (the day after most of the Coo-ees embarked for Egypt on the HMAT A15 Star of England) : ‘Stan is now at the officers’ school, which this week is at the show ground, Sydney, but next week should be at Duntroon. The Coo-ees sailed on Wednesday morning. They spent the previous night at the show ground and Stan was with them right through and saw them off. He would have liked to go with them, but I thought he ought not to miss the greater opportunity offered in the officers’ school. He speaks of them as the finest of all the reinforcements that were reviewed the other afternoon. They have done well so far, and there need be no doubt of the record they will put up when they join the 13th. in Egypt – one of the battalions that has done excellently in the Gallipoli fighting.’[3]

He returned to the 13th Battalion on the 10th of May 1916 as Acting Company Sergeant Major.

On his embarkation roll his rank was Acting Sergeant, and his address at time of enrolment was 25 Roslyn Gardens, Darlinghurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs E. [Effie] Stephens, 19 Roslyn Gardens, Darlinghurst, N.S.W.

Acting Sergeant Stephens departed Sydney on the HMAT A14 Euripides on 9th September 1916 as 20th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion, and arrived in Plymouth, England, on 26th October 1916. With him travelled fellow Coo-ees Acting Sergeant Thomas W. Dowd, and Acting Corporal Francis Charles Finlayson.

On 4rd November 1916 Acting Sergeant Stephens marched into the 4th Training Battalion at Codford, England.

On 20th December 1916 Acting Sergeant Stephens departed Folkestone aboard the SS Princess Clementine bound for France. On 22nd December 1916 he arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, where he reverted to the rank of Private.

The Farmer and Settler reported that ‘Stan E. Stephens, of the “Farmer and Settler” staff, who left Sydney as sergeant-major of a reinforcement company of the 13th Battalion, lost his n.c.o. rank as soon as he set foot in France, because the Australian army there has a healthy regulation that gives precedence to men that have earned their stripes’.[4]

On 2nd January 1917 Private Stephens joined at the 13th Battalion at Ribemont, France, to undergo training.

Private Stephens described his first “baptism of fire” going “over the top” on a raid on a German trench in the front line in the vicinity of Guedecourt, France, on the night of 4th February 1917, in a letter home that was published in The Farmer and Settler on 17th August 1917.[5]  He wrote:

… “Some one said: ‘Get ready’, and I was just wishing I was at home, or anywhere else in the wide world, when a fervent ‘Ah!’ in the vicinity made me look around. A mess-tin full of rum was being passed along. Everyone took a swig, and passed it on. There was plenty in it when it came to me, and I just gulped down a couple of mouthfuls and handed it to Fin [Finlayson], when, ‘bang,’ ‘bang,’ ‘screech,’ ‘screech,’ over our heads came some shells. Many men involuntarily ‘ducked,’ but were reassured by someone saying: ‘They’re ours.’ So they were. The barrage had started — only a minute to go! Thank Heaven for that rum. It pulled me together, stopped the nervous trembling that made me afraid that everybody would notice me and think I was going to ‘squib’ it. I was cool enough to notice things then, but still I glanced hatefully now and then at the top of the bank above me.

“Somebody said: ‘Now!’ There was a bustle, and I found myself up in No Man’s Land jostling someone to get around a shell-hole. The order had come simultaneously from both ends of our line, so that we at the centre were a bit behind — a sag in the middle. Everything could be seen as clear as day; the line stretched out to right and left. We crouched in our advance, moving slowly, picking our way, with the shells shrieking over us, and bursting only a few yards in front of us. I thought about the ‘backwash.’ Why weren’t some of us killed. Would they knock our heads off if we stood up straight? We were in semi-open order, perhaps five or six deep, and advancing slowly. Oh!, the weight on my back from the heavy kit and the stooping. Yet I felt amused at the struggles of a chap that was sitting down, softly cursing a piece of barbed wire— such silly, meaningless curses. Another stumbled in front of me, and I nearly jabbed him with my bayonet. Then I looked around smartly, to see if any one was close enough behind me to treat me likewise.

“The wire! We were up to it already. But the shells weren’t finished. They had made a good mess of it, I saw as I stepped through from loop to loop. A piece caught me somewhere, but something gave way and I was free again. No; the shells weren’t finished yet. ‘They are bursting behind me.’ I exclaimed to myself, ‘Why on earth don’t I get killed? Are they charmed, so as to kill only Fritzes.’ I caught the flash of another out of the tail of my eye, and then there was a straight line of intermittent flashes in front. What’s this? At that moment I slid and scrambled down a steep, bank and found myself in the German trench!

“Our barrage was just lifting. A Fritz officer afterwards said: ‘I knew you were  Australians; you come in with your barrage; you are too quick for us.’ Yes, we went in with the barrage, instead of a few moments after it— and without a casualty!

“The details of this, my first hop-over, my baptism of fire, are indelibly printed on my memory. I shall always remember the impressions made on me, down to the most trivial incident of the hop-over. Thinking over it afterwards, I have tried to reason out why we got in with our barrage. It’s a good fault, for it prevents the Germans from getting ready for us when the barrage lifts. The Germans reckon that the Australians are always too quick for them that way. I certainly believe that a spirit of ‘don’t-care-a-damn’ was abroad; or, maybe, it was hereditary bloodthirstiness that came out in the excitement, and made us, for the time being, all ‘hogs for stoush.’ I think only the fear that we would be killed by our own curtain of fire kept us from actually running. It wasn’t the rum, anyhow, as the slanderous have asserted. The rum, I found out afterwards, was our first casualty, being broken in the coming up, so that the only rum issued was half a demi-john to a small section of trench that I happened to be in. The jar was found by a chap taking German prisoners back half an hour later, still  nearly half full.’… [Click here to read a full transcription of this article:  https://cooeemarch1915.com/2015/03/19/stanley-e-stephens-letter-about-his-baptism-of-fire-in-the-trenches]

Three days later, on 7th February 1917 Private Stephens was slightly wounded in action whilst the Battalion was in action near Guedecourt, France. He was one of 51 wounded this day another 21 members of the Battalion were killed. He re-joined the Battalion on 15th February 1917 whilst it was training and conducting fatigues at Mametz, France.

Just over two months later, on 11th April 1917 Private Stephens was reported Missing in Action during an attack on the Hindenburg Line near Bullecourt, France. He was one of 367 men from the Battalion reported missing this day, and another 25 were killed and 118 wounded.

After a Court of Enquiry was held by the Battalion on 8th October 1917 Private Stephens was officially listed as Killed in Action.

Private Stephens has no known grave, and his name is commemorated on the Australian National Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux, France.

Private Stephen’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Stephens’ name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Stephens’ name is also commemorated on panel 71 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

[1] ‘Our soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 26 October 1915, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601552

[2] ‘Gilgandra Recruiting Association’, Gilgandra Weekly, 10 December 1915, p. 6, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119922432

[3] Letter from H. J. Stephens to A. H. Miller dated 9th March 1915 in: Alex Halden (Joe) Miller papers mainly relating to the Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March, New South Wales, 1912-1921, 1939. Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March correspondence and papers, 1915-1939.

[4] ‘The soldiers that voted “No”’, The Farmer and Settler, April 1917, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116643546

[5] ‘A baptism of fire’, The Farmer and Settler, 17 August, 1917, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116642518

 

 

William Henry NICHOLLS

William Henry NICHOLLS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2369), William Henry Nicholls was born at Camperdown, Sydney, N.S.W. He gave his age as 27 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as contractor. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 143 lbs., with a fair complexion, green eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had 12 months experience in the school cadets.

He completed his medical on the 2nd October 1915 at Coonamble, and was attested at Coonamble on the 21s October 1915. However another Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form in his service record was made at Dubbo on 21st October 1915 (after the Coo-ee March had passed through this town), and his medical examination form dated 2nd October 1915 at Coonamble is countersigned by Dr. E.H. Burkett at Dubbo and dated 21st October 1915.

William Henry Nicholls was reported to have been ‘one of the Coo-ees’ in the Leader.[1] It appears that he was one of the two men from Coonamble reported in the Gilgandra Weekly as catching up with the Coo-ees at Molong on 22nd October 1915 – the other being ‘Coonambleite’ Jack Parker, who also did his medical at Dubbo on 21st October 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On the 23rd March 1916 he was transferred to the 16th Reinforcements for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Coonamble, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his aunt, Salina [sic] Ann Bradbury, Richmond, Rocky Point Road, Sans Souci, N.S.W.

On 18th April 1916 Trooper Nicholls departed Sydney on the HMAT A56 Palermo, arriving in Egypt on 18th May 1916.

On 21st May 1916 Trooper Nicholls was admitted to the Government Hospital at Suez with Mumps. On 17th June 1916 he was discharged from hospital and rejoined the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-El-Kebir, Egypt.

On 5th August 1916 Trooper Nicholls departed the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment to join the 7th Light Horse Regiment. On 16th August 1916 Trooper Nicholls marched into the 7th Light Horse Regiment when it was resting at Bir Etmaler, Egypt.

On 14th February 1917 the Regiment was conducting training at Masaid, Egypt. Trooper Nicholls was detached to the Division Headquarters for duty. He returned to the Regiment on 1st March 1917 when it was resting at Sheik Zowaiid, Egypt.

On 8th March 1917 the Regiment was conducting usual camp duties at Bir Abu Shunnar, Egypt – on this day Trooper Nicholls was charged with loss of equipment viz sword and bayonet.

On 24th of April 1917 the Regiment was manning outposts and Patrolling in the Sinai after being involved in the Second Battle of Gaza. A Squadron of the 7th Regiment had an engagement with a party of Turkish Cavalry at Tel Al Tarar. 18 Turks were captured one of them wounded. Trooper Nicholls was evacuated to the 54th Casualty Clearing Station at Deir el Belah suffering Heat Exhaustion. On 25th April 1917 he moved by Hospital Train to the 26th Casualty Clearing Station at El Arish, arriving on 28th April 1917. On 30th April 1917 he was transferred to the 24th Stationary Hospital at Kantara, Egypt, suffering from Pyrexia (Fever), arriving on the 1st of May 1917. Later that day he was transferred to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Abbassia, Egypt.

On 16th May 1917 Trooper Nicholls was discharged from hospital and reported to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Moascar, Egypt.

On 30th May 1917 Trooper Nicholls was detached for duty at the Headquarters of the Australian New Zealand Mounted Division Training Centre. Trooper Nicholls remained on this detached duty until 7th November 1917 when he was sent back to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment.

On 18th November 1917 Trooper Nicholls left the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment for return to the 7th Light Horse Regiment. On the way, on 20th November 1917 he was admitted to the 2nd Light Horse Field Ambulance suffering from Gonorrhoea. That same day he was transferred to the 66th Casualty Clearing Station. On 21st November 1917 he was transferred to the 44th Stationary Hospital at Kantara, Egypt. On 22nd November 1917 he was sent to the 2nd Australian Stationary Hospital at Moascar, Egypt.

On 18th December 1917 Trooper Nicholls was discharged from hospital and returned to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment. On 31st December 1917 Trooper Nicholls was sent to the rest camp at Port Said, Egypt. On 20th January 1918 he left the rest camp and returned to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment.

On 21st March 1918 Trooper Nicholls was charged with When on Active Service Absenting himself Without Leave from 0900 20th March 1918 until he reported himself at 0830 21st March 1918. He was awarded 7 days confined to Camp and fined 2 days pay.

On 12th April 1918 Trooper Nicholls rejoined the 7th Light Horse Regiment when it was in action around Wadi Augua, Palestine.

On 7th May 1918 the 7th Light Horse Regiment was at Jericho, Palestine, when at 0500 eight enemy aeroplanes bombed the camp. The Regiment’s casualties were 3 killed and 10 wounded. Trooper Nicholls was one of those killed in action.

Trooper Nicholls is buried in the Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel. A photograph of his grave can be seen at (and purchased from) http://twgpp.org/information.php?id=1242338

Trooper Nicholls’ name is commemorated on panel 5 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

W. H. Nicholls' name on the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour (Photograph: S. &. H. Thompson 5/1/2015)

W. H. Nicholls’ name on the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour (Photograph: S. &. H. Thompson 5/1/2015)

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission Register lists that he was the son of the late Arthur and Louisa Nicholls.[3]

[1] ‘Personal’, Leader, 22 May 1918, p. 1, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article100963899

[2] ‘With the “Coo-ees.” From town to town’, Gilgandra Weekly , 20 October 1915, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119923919 ; ‘Our soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 2 November 1915, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601759

[3] Nicholls, Tpr. William Henry, 2369, Commonwealth War Graves Commission Register, Jerusalem War Cemetery, http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/647728/NICHOLLS,%20WILLIAM%20HENRY

 

Thomas JACKSON

Thomas JACKSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4816), Thomas Jackson was born at Longford, Derby, Derbyshire, England. He gave his age as 32 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 146 lbs., with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

Thomas Jackson had come to Australia about 1911, when he was 28 years of age.[1] The Wellington Times recorded “Jackson” as one of the four recruits who stepped forward offering to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees recruited at Geurie on 15th October 1915.[2]

He completed his medical on the 16th October 1915 at Wellington, and was attested at Dripstone by Captain Nicholas on the 19th October 1915.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 2nd February 1916 Private Jackson was charged with being Absent Without Leave for one day. He was fined one days forfeiture of pay.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Longford, near Derby, England, and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs L. [Louisa] Jackson, Longford, near Derby, England.

On 8th March 1916 Private Jackson along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 3rd of May 1916 Private JACKSON was hospitalised at the 31st General Hospital at Port Said sick. He was discharged to duty on 2nd June 1916.

Private Jackson proceeded overseas to join his unit in France [date and ship unknown], via England, leaving the 4th Training Battalion at Rollestone on 30th July 1916. He marched into the 4th Division Base Depot at Etaples in France on 1st August 1916. On 19th August 1916 he was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion whilst it was resting at Pernois, after just coming out of the line at Pozieres.

On 25th September 1916 whilst the 13th Battalion was in action in the vicinity of Voormezeele, Belgium, Private Jackson was admitted to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Enteritis. He rejoined the Battalion on the 1st of October 1916.

On 11th April 1917 Private Jackson was with the 13th Battalion when it launched an unsuccessful attack on the Hindenburg Line in the vicinity of Bullecourt, France. During this attack Private Jackson was wounded in action, receiving shrapnel wounds to his face and neck. He was evacuated to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station. On 13th April he was admitted to the 11th Stationary Hospital at Rouen. On 14th April he was admitted to the 2nd Convalescent Depot at Rouen. On 21st April he was discharged and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples. On 30th April 1917 he rejoined the 13th Battalion whilst the Battalion was conducting training at Ribemont, France.

On 28th May 1917 Private Jackson was charged with being Absent Without Leave from Tattoo roll call on 24th May 1917 from 9.00 pm to 9.45 pm whilst the Battalion was in training. He was fined one days pay.

On 16th June 1917 Private Jackson was with the 13th Battalion when it was manning support trenches in the vicinity of Messines, Belgium. Private Jackson was one of two men killed from the 13th Battalion that day. Another five men were wounded.

Per his service record he was “buried N. of Hill 63 and about 250 yds N.E. of thatched cottage and about 100 yds West of above, close to Old Dugouts of support trench 1 ¾ mls S.S.W of Messines France”. However, Private Jackson’s grave could not be located after the war, and his name is remembered on the Menin Gate Memorial at Ieper (Ypres), Belgium.

T. Jackson's name on the Menin Gate Memorial (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 11/9/2012)

T. Jackson’s name on the Menin Gate Memorial (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 11/9/2012)

Private Jackson’s name is commemorated on panel 69 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

His name is also remembered on the St. Chad’s Church War Memorial, at Longford in Derbyshire, England.[3]

[1] Thomas Jackson, Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour Circular, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1643701/

[2] ‘Hitchen’s Coo-ees’, Wellington Times, 18 October 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388423

[3] ‘Thomas Jackson’, Longford St. Chad’s Church War Memorial, Derbyshire, England, http://www.militaryimages.net/media/longford-church-war-memorial-derbyshire.57565/

Laurence Leslie MAGUIRE

Laurence Leslie MAGUIRE

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4840), Laurence Leslie Maguire was born at Gilgandra, N.S.W. He gave his age as 25 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 7 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 8th October 1915 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Gilgandra on the 9th October 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Woodvale Park, Curban, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, R. Maguire, Belmore Street, Gulgong, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Maguire along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

After arriving in Egypt he was transferred to the 45th Battalion on the 20th May 1916.

On the 7th June 1916 Private Maguire left Alexandria aboard the transport Huntspill bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 14th June 1916.

On the 19th July 1916 Private Maguire was taken on strength of the 45th Battalion.

On 6th November 1916 the 45th Battalion had just arrived at Dernancourt, France for training when Private Maguire was injured by having his right foot scalded. He was sent to the 1st New Zealand Stationary Hospital at Amiens, France. On 9th November 1916 he was sent by hospital train to the 8th General Hospital at Rouen, France, arriving on the 10th of November 1916. On 27th November 1916 he was sent to Le Harve, France, where on 28th November 1916 he boarded the hospital ship Gloucester Castle. After arriving in England he was admitted to the 2nd Southern General Hospital at Bristol, England.

On 10th January 1917 Private Maguire was discharged from the 2nd Southern General Hospital and went on leave until 25th January 1917, when he reported to the No. 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England.

On 3rd February 1917 Private Maguire was admitted to the 1st Camp Hospital at Parkhouse, England sick. He remained hospitalised until 14th April 1917. He returned to the No. 1 Command Depot on 16th April 1917.

On 25th April 1917 Private Maguire was transferred to the 62nd Battalion which was then forming in England. Private Maguire went to the battalion lines at Windmill Hill Camp. On 12th September 1917 Private Maguire was returned to the 45th Battalion, after the decision was made to disband the 62nd Battalion. On 12th September 1917 Private Maguire departed Southampton, England bound for France.

On 13th September 1917 Private Maguire marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France. On 21st September 1917 he departed Etaples to rejoin the 45th Battalion. On 22nd of September 1917 Private Maguire arrived at the 45th Battalion when it was about to go into action in the Ypres area of Belgium, in the Passchendaele offensive.

On 1st November 1917 he was appointed Lance Corporal.

After serving with the 45th Battalion during the winter of 1917-1918, Lance Corporal Maguire was killed in action during a German artillery barrage when manning the line against the German offensive near Dernacourt, France,  on 2nd April 1918.

According to a letter sent home to his father that was published in the Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative by Captain Holman, 45th Battalion, Lance Corporal Maguire was buried on the embankment of the Albert-Amiens railway, near Albert, France.[1] His service record reports that he was buried at Albert, France. However after the war his grave could not be located, and he has no known grave.

Lance Corporal Maguire is remembered on the Australian National Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux, France. The register at the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial notes that he was the son of Richard Gould Maguire, and Charlotte Maguire, of Gulgong, N.S.W.

Lance Corporal Maguire's name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Lance Corporal Maguire’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Lance Corporal Maguire’s name is commemorated on panel 140 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Lance Corporal Maguire’s name is also remembered on the Gilgandra War Memorial.

[1] ‘How ‘Laurie Maguire was killed’, Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative, 15 July 1918, p. 1, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article156994727

 

 

Karl Alex Frederick NIELSON

Karl Alex Frederick NIELSON

Per his Application for Certificate of Naturalization dated 4th September 1915, under the name Karl Axel Frederik Nielsen, he was born on 19th December 1890 at Nestved, Sjaelland, Denmark, and arrived in Newcastle, Australia, from the United States of America on 15th April 1913, on the Canada Cape.[1] Per a letter in this file dated 29th August 1915 he applied to be naturalized so he could be eligible to enlist to join a “mate” who had already enlisted.

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4865), Karl Alex Frederick Nielson was born at Sjelland, Denmark. He gave his age as 24 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as Bushman. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, with a ruddy complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service. Although he did not complete his medical examination until 13th November 1915 at Liverpool, and was attested at Liverpool on the 13th November 1915, his date of joining on the nominal roll was recorded as the 8th November 1915, when the Coo-ees were on their way from Lawson to Springwood. Per The Blue Mountains Echo he was one of three recruits to join the Coo-es from Hazelbrook.[2]

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll he is named as Karl Axle Nielson, and his address at time of enrolment was C/- Mrs. Hook, Wentworth Falls, Blue Mountains, N.S.W. His next of kin is listed as Mrs D. [i.e. E.] Hook, Wentworth Falls, Blue Mountains, N.S.W.

Mrs [Ellen] Hook described him in a letter dated 4th December 1921 in his service record as “a mate of my son [Augustus “Gus” James Hook, who had joined the AIF on 26th August 1915] and always made my place his home long before he enlisted”.

On 8th March 1916 Private Nielson along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Nielson was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 6th May 1916 Private Nielson was admitted to the 54th Casualty Clearing Station at Serapeum, Egypt, with an illness Not Yet Diagnosed. That same day he was transferred to the 12th Field Ambulance. On 22nd May 1916 Private Nielson was discharged and returned to his unit

On 4th June 1916 Private Nielson left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 15th July 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was at Canaples, France, conducting training. On this day Private Nielson was charged with Conduct to the Prejudice of Good Order and Military Discipline in that he while on Parade replied in an insubordinate manner to NCO who was instructing Parade. He was awarded one day Field Punishment Number 2.

On 6th August 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was maintaining Tramway Trench in the ruins of the village of Pozieres which was under heavy German artillery fire during the Battle of Pozieres when Private Nielson was killed in action. Also killed with him in the 4th Pioneer Battalion on the same day were fellow Coo-ees Oliver James Harmon (who joined the Coo-ee March at Parramatta), and John Tarlington (who joined at Blayney).

An entry in Private Nielson’s service record notes that he was ‘Believed buried at Copse Avenue Pozieres’. However his body was not able to be located.

Private Nielson is remembered on the Australian National Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux in France.

Private Nielson's name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Nielson’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Nielson’s name is commemorated on panel 114 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour. His place of association is Hazelbrook.

Hi name is also remembered on the Wentworth Falls War Memorial.

[1] Karl Axel Frederik Nielsen, Hazelbrook, Labourer, ‘Application for Certificate of Naturalization’, stamped 17 September 1915, http://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/scripts/Imagine.asp?B=33454

[2] ‘Hazelbrook’, The Blue Mountain Echo , 19 November 1915, p. 6, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108047454. Note: named as “Harry Neilsen”, and “An earlier recruit, Mr. Gus Hook, was also present”.

 

Rowland John WILSON

 Rowland John WILSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4910), Rowland John Wilson was born at Tallawang, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 24 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 10 stone 6 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had 3 months experience with the Lawson Rifle Club. The “Joined on” date on his Attestation Paper was 7th November 1915.  He was attested at Lawson on 7th November 1915.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. He completed his medical examination at Liverpool on 15th November 1915.

On his embarkation roll he is listed under the name Ronald John Wilson, and his address at time of enrolment was Queens Road, Lawson, N.S.W.  His next of kin is listed as his brother [i.e. uncle], P. J. Wilson, Queens Road, Lawson, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Wilson along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916. On the 19th April 1916 Private Wilson was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Wilson left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 8th June 1916.

Private Wilson served with the 45th Battalion during its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916. Private Wilson then moved with the 45th Battalion to Pozieres, France, in early August 1916.

Private Wilson was killed on the night of the 7th/8th August 1916 when the 45th Battalion was under heavy enemy artillery fire between Pozieres and Martinpuich in the Battle of Pozieres – the same night that fellow Coo-ee William Emerton Hunter was killed, who was also in the 45th Battalion.

Private Wilson’s date of death is recorded as 8th August 1916. He has no known grave.

Private Wilson is remembered on the Australian National Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux in France.

Private Wilson's name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Wilson’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Wilson’s name is commemorated on panel 141 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

His name is also remembered on the Lawson War Memorial.

[1] NAA: B2455, WILSON R J

William WEBBER

William WEBBER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4917), William Webber was born at Granville, N.S.W. He gave his age as 23 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as fitter. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 5 inches tall, weight 136 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military experience. He completed his medical on the 11th November 1915 at Ashfield, and was attested at Ashfield on the 11th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Walker Street, Five Dock, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs. M. E. [Mary Elizabeth] Webber, Walker Street, Five Dock, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Webber departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, arriving in Egypt on the 11th April 1916. On the 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Serapeum.

On 1st May 1916 at Serapeum, Egypt, Private Webber was charged with Being Absent Without Leave from 0815 on 29th April 1916 to 1500 on 30th April 1916. He was awarded 7 days Confined to Barracks and forfeiture of four days pay. On 25th May 1916 Private Webber was charged with being Absent for Parade at 1830. He was awarded 7 days Confined to Barracks.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Webber left Alexandria aboard the Transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Webber served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916.

On 6th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was in action between Pozieres and Martinpuch, France. They had been under heavy artillery fire since entering the battle the day before, and suffered numerous casualties, with 32 killed (including fellow Coo-ee Jack Morris who had joined the Coo-ees at Parramatta), and 70 wounded. Private Webber was evacuated suffering shell shock, and listed as wounded in action. He was sent back to the 1st Australian Rest Station. On 14th August 1916 Private Webber returned to the Battalion when it was relieving the 46th Battalion in the front line near Pozieres.

On 16th September 1916 the 45th Battalion had been moved to Victoria Camp near Rhenninghelst, Belgium, conducting training. On this day Private Webber was charged with being Absent for Parade at 0645, 0900, 1400 on 15th September 1916. He was awarded 7 days field Punishment Number 2.

On 7th November 1916 the 45th Battalion was at Dernacourt, France, conducting training, when Private Webber was charged with Conduct to the Prejudice of Good Order and Military Discipline to with making remarks likely to cause insubordination. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment Number 2.

On 11th November 1916 the 45th Battalion moved forward from Dernacourt to Fricourt, France. At 1030 on this day Private Webber went missing. He was not located until 1115 on 7th December 1916. Private Webber was placed under arrest and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, under escort.

On 26th December 1916 a Field General Court Martial was held with Private Webber being charged with When on Active Service Deserting his Majesty’s Service. Private Webber was found guilty and sentenced to be shot. On 3rd January 1917 the sentence was varied by General Rawlinson, Commander of the 4th Army, to 10 years Penal Servitude.

On 20th January 1917 Private Webber was admitted to the Number 1 Military Prison at Rouen, France, to undergo his sentence. On 4th February 1917 the sentence was commuted to 2 years Imprisonment with Hard Labour by the Commander In Chief.

On 25th January 1918 Private Webber was released from the number 1 Military Prison at Rouen, France, with the remainder of his sentence being suspended. On 29th January 1918 Private Webber rejoined the 45th Battalion whilst it was training at La Clytte, Belgium.

On 6th April 1918 the 45th Battalion was in action in the vicinity of Dernacourt, France, when Private Webber was killed by an artillery shell that burst in the trench he was manning.

Private Cyril Roy McMillan, who had joined the Coo-ees at Parramatta, was taken as a German prisoner of war in the same battle, and he reported after his release in a letter to “The Argus” dated 20th November 1918, that Webber, whom he described as one of his ‘mates’ he had ‘enlisted with’, had been ‘killed alongside’ him, just before they ‘started to advance on the Germans’ (The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 18/1/1919, p. 10).

Private Webber was initially buried in the trench by his platoon members, then later reinterred at the Millencourt Communal Cemetery near Albert, however in later fighting the grave was lost or destroyed and could not be located.

Private Webber has no known grave, and is remembered on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France.

Private Webber's name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Webber’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Webber’s name is commemorated on panel 140 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Private Webber’s name is also remembered on the Five Dock War Memorial.

Jack MORRIS

Jack MORRIS

Jack Morris (Photograph: Australian War Memorial)

Jack Morris (Photograph: Australian War Memorial)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4849), Jack Morris was born at Pennant Hills, N.S.W. He gave his age as 18 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as rivetter. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 ½ inches tall, weight 134 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and light hair. His religious denomination was Wesleyan. He claimed that he had 4 years previous V.T. experience. He completed his medical on the 11th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested at Parramatta on the 11th November 1915. A note in his service record from his mother Annie Morris gave permission for her son Jack Morris to enlist in the Australian Expeditionary Force, dated 11th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Sorrell Street, Parramatta, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his widowed mother, Mrs. A. [Annie] Morris, Sorrell Street, Parramatta, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Morris departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, arriving in Egypt on the 11th April 1916. On the 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Serapeum. On the 23rd April 1916 he was sent to hospital sick. He rejoined the 45th Battalion on 1st May 1916.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Morris left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Morris served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix in France in July 1916, then as it moved to Pozieres in early August 1916. It was whist the 45th Battalion was in action in the vicinity of Pozieres, France, that Private Morris was killed in action on the night of the 5th/6thth of August 1916. His official date of death is the 6th August 1916. He has no known grave.

He died in the Battle of Pozieres on the same day as three Coo-ees in the 4th Pioneer Division – Oliver Harmon, another Coo-ee who joined at Parramatta, John Tarlington, who joined the Coo-ees at Blayney, and Karl Alex Frederick Neilson, who joined the Coo-ees at Springwood.

His death was reported in The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (9/9/1916 p. 4) as follows:

‘The Late Private Jack Morris.
The only son of a Parramatta widow.
One of the very sad cases of the losses of brave young soldiers was that when it was officially reported early this week to Mrs. Morris, widow, of Sorrell-street, Parramatta North, that her only son, a well-known Parramatta lad, Private Charles John (“Jack”) Morris, who enlisted at Parramatta with “the Coo-ees,” had been killed. Private Morris was born at Pennant Hills, and he would have been 19 years of age, had he lived, on the 28th of October. He was educated at the Brothers’ School, Parramatta North. His last letter was received three weeks ago, and was dated June 24. He had been to Egypt, and had then gone on to France, and was at the time of writing at the back of the fighting line, and within the sound of the guns. He left four sisters. He was reported to have been killed in action on the 5th or 6th of August.

Private Morris is remembered on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France.

Private Morris' name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Morris’ name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Morris’ name is commemorated on panel 140 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Private Morris’ name is also listed on the Parramatta War Memorial (under C. J. Morris).

John TARLINGTON

John TARLINGTON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4605), John Tarlington was born at Glen Innes, N.S.W. He gave his age as 38 years and 7 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 11 stone 5 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.

On his attestation paper dated 26th October 1915, John Tarlington claimed previous service of 10 months in South Africa during the Boer War with the New South Wales Mounted Infantry, and 2 months previous service with the 18th Battalion.

John Tarlington had enlisted previously in the AIF on 20th May 1915 (with regimental no. 727) and completed two months training before being discharged at his wife’s request on 8th July 1915. Noted on this previous attestation paper dated 20th May 1915 was that at he had ‘Served 13th Battalion Discharged for breaking leave’. According to a statement in his service record that John Tarlington had made at the time of his 20th May 1915 enlistment, as he was unable to produce a discharge certificate for his previous service, he had enlisted about the ‘middle of November 1914 and was pooled’ to the 13th Battalion, from which he had been ‘discharged the day before embarkation on a charge of “Overstaying leave”’. He was ‘granted 24 hours leave, & returned to camp about 24 hours late, owing to severe illness’ of his wife, and on his return he was told his ‘place had been filled’ on account of his absence , and he was ‘then ordered off the ground by one of the Military Police’.

John Tarlington was in the process of applying to re-enlist in the AIF for the third time before he joined up with the Coo-ees at Blayney. On his initial Application to enlist form in his service record dated 11th October 1915 at Lithgow, John Tarlington gave his address as Coombing Park, Carcoar, N.S.W.  A letter in his service record stated that he would present himself on the 26th October after he had given two week’s notice to his employer. It appears he presented himself to the Coo-ee March at Blayney on the 26th October, instead of returning to Lithgow to enlist.

He completed his medical examination on the 26th October 1915 at Blayney, and was attested by Captain Eade at Blayney on 26th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Guildford Road, Guildford, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs. S. [Susan] Tarlington, Guildford Road, Guildford , N.S.W.

Private Tarlington departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat on 16th February 1916. He arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916. On 1st April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post, Egypt.

On 14th April 1916 Private Tarlington reported to the 14th Field ambulance sick, and he was sent to the 2nd Casualty Clearing Station, then to the Number 1 Australian Stationary Hospital at Ismalia, Egypt. The next day 15th April 1916 Private Tarlington was admitted to the 1st Dermatological Hospital at Abassia, Egypt. He was discharged on 21st April 1916.

On 23rd May 1916 Private Tarilington was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

Private Tarlington left Alexandria on 6th June 1916 aboard the Transport Ionian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 15th June 1916. He went to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France. On 21st June 1916 he departed Etaples and joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion the next day on 22nd June 1916 when it was at Armentieres, France constructing defensive works.

On 6th August 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was maintaining Tramway Trench in the ruins of the village of Pozieres which was under heavy German artillery fire during the Battle of Pozieres when Private Tarlington was killed in action. Also killed with him in the 4th Pioneer Battalion on the same day were fellow Coo-ees Oliver James Harmon (who joined the Coo-ees at Parramatta), and Karl Alex Frederick Neilson (who joined the Coo-ees at Springwood).

According to his Red Cross Wounded and Missing report, Private Tarlington was killed by a shell as ‘he got on the top of the trench at Pozieres to allow some wounded men to pass along the trench’, and he was buried ‘afterwards just over the parapet of the trench’, and ‘the grave was not marked’.[1]

Private Tarlington has no known grave, and is remembered on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial in France. He left a widow and a son.

Private Tarlington's name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Tarlington’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Tarlington’s name is commemorated on panel 174 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Private Tarlington’s name is also remembered on the Guildford Soldiers Memorial at the Soldiers Memorial School of Arts Hall at Guildford.

[1] ‘4605 Private John Tarlington’, Red Cross Wounded and Missing Enquiry Bureau Files, 1914-1918 War 1DRL/0428, http://static.awm.gov.au/images/collection/pdf/RCDIG1059988–1-.pdf