Tag Archives: Wellington recruits

Patrick GOOLEY

Patrick GOOLEY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4781), Patrick Gooley was born at Burrowa, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 43 years and 6 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as contractor. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 11 stone 11 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

Gooley was reported in the Wellington Times as one of the men who enlisted with the Coo-ees at Wellington.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Wellington). He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 20th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees marched from Stuart Town to Euchareena).

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 4th January 1916 Private Gooley was charged with being absent without leave from 16th December 1915 to 17th December 1915, and from 20th  December 1915 to 3rd January 1916.  He was fined 10 shillings, and forfeited 12 days pay.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 56 George Street, Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his wife, Mrs C. Gooley, Glanmere [sic], via Bathurst, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Gooley departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Gooley left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Gooley served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 29th November 1916 he was detached for duty with the Australian Army Service Corps.

He went on leave from France on 29th August 1917 to 8th September 1917.

Private Gooley served with the 26th Australian Army Service Corps until he re-joined the 45th Battalion on 7th October 1918.

On 17th October 1918 he was sent to the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Harve, France, for a Medical Board, where he was classed as having senility.

On 31st October 1918 he was transferred to England.

On 1st November 1918 he marched into the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 4th December 1918 Private Gooley departed England aboard the H.M.A.T. Somerset, bound for Australia for medical discharge.

He arrived in Australia on 16th January 1919.

He was discharged from the A.I.F. medically unfit on 4th February 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, GOOLEY P

[2] HITCHEN’S COO-EES. (1915, October 18). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388424

 

John HOGAN

John HOGAN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2354), John Hogan was born at Gunnedah, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 45 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 154 lbs., with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 17th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees rested at Wellington), and was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 19th October 1915. He claimed to have previous military service in the Boer War.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went Menangle Light Horse Camp as reinforcement for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

On his embarkation roll his address as time of enrolment was Wellington, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed was listed as friend, James William Hoy, Hermitage Flat, Lithgow, N.S.W.[2]

Trooper Hogan departed Sydney on the HMAT Palermo A56 on 18th April 1916, with the 16th Reinforcements for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

After arriving in Egypt he was taken on strength by the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-el Kebir on 10th June 1916.

On 6th July 1916 he was taken on strength of the 2nd Double Squadron at Serapeum.

On 30th July 1916 Trooper Hogan he was transferred to the 1st Field Squadron Engineers Australian and New Zealand Mounted Division at Kantara, Egypt.

On 30th September 1917 Sapper Hogan was detached for duty with the Gamli Light Railway.

On 25th January 1918 he was sent to the military Dump at Ludd, Palestine.

He returned to his unit on 9th March 1919.

Sapper Hogan began his return to Australia on 3rd July 1919,  aboard the H.T. Malta at Kantara, Egypt.

Sapper Hogan arrived in Australia on 10th August 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 25th September 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, HOGAN J 2354

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, John Hogan 2354, HMAT Palermo A56, 18th April 1916.

Patrick WILLIS

Patrick WILLIS

Per his military service record (Depot), Patrick Willis was born at Yass, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 34 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as shearer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 144 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was recorded as Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He listed his mother, Mrs Catherine Willis, Sorrell Street, Parramatta North, as his next of kin on his Attestation Paper.

The Wellington Times reported  ‘Willis’ as one of the 8 named men who offered themselves as recruits to join the Coo-ee March at the recruiting meeting held at the Wongarbon Hall on 14th October 1915.[2]

‘P. Willis’ was listed as one of the Wongarbon boys with the Coo-ees in The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate.[3]

He completed his medical examination on 16th October 1915 at Wellington (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Wellington), and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Dripstone on the 19th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 7th February 1916 Private Willis was charged with being absent without leave from 27th January 1916 to 6th February 1916. He was fined 50 shillings.

On 24th February 1916 Private Willis was charged with being absent without leave from 18th February 1916 till 23rd February 1916. He was recommended to be discharged.

Private Willis was discharged services no longer required on 25th February 1916.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WILLIS PATRICK

[2] ON THE TRACK. (1915, October 18). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved April 2, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388423

[3] Our Soldiers (1915, October 29). The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate (NSW : 1894 – 1954), p. 4. Retrieved April 2, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601711

 

William JENKINS

William JENKINS

Per his military service record (Depot), William Jenkins was born at Bendigo, Victoria. [1]   He gave his age as 25 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 3 inches tall, weight 119 lbs.,  with a dark complexion, grey eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His next of kin was listed on his Attestation Paper as his mother, Mrs H. Jenkins, Bendigo, Victoria.

‘Jenkins, W.’ was listed in the Wellington Times as one of the men who joined the Coo-ees at Wellington.[2]

He completed his medical examination on 16th October 1915 at Wellington, and was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas when the Coo-ees were at Mumbil on 19th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 17th November 1915 Private Jenkins went before a medical board at Liverpool Camp, where he was diagnosed to have ‘insufficient chest measurement’, and unfit for active service.

On 21st November 1915 Private Jenkins was charged with being absent without leave. He was fined 1 days pay.

Private Jenkins was discharged  from the A.I.F. medically unfit on 29th November 1915.

William Jenkins re-enlisted in the A.I.F. at Wagga Wagga N.S.W. on 28th October 1918, where he was attested, and completed a medical examination.  He stated he had two weeks previous military experience at Liverpool Camp Sydney on this new Attestation Paper.[3]

However, when he went before a medical board held at Victoria Barracks in Sydney the next day on 29th October 1918, he was again found unfit for active service, and discharged due to ‘deficient chest expansion’.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, JENKINS WILLIAM

[2] HITCHEN’S COO-EES. (1915, October 18). Wellington Times (NSW : 1899 – 1954), p. 3. Retrieved March 11, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388424

[3] NAA: B2455, JENKINS WILLIAM

John BARTLEY

John BARTLEY

Per his military service record (Depot), John Bartley was born at Ballarat, Victoria.[1] He gave his age as 33 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as shearer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 168 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (when the Coo-ees were at Wellington). He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Mumbil on 19th October 1915.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as Charlotte Crougey, Osborne Street, Williamstown, Melbourne, Victoria.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp.

On 17th November 1915 Private Bartley went before a medical Board at Liverpool Camp where he was deemed as unfit for military service due to defective vision.

Private Bartley was discharged medically unfit on 29th November 1915.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, BARTLEY J

Walter James WATTS

Walter James WATTS

Per his military service record (Depot), Walter James Watts was born at Hay, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 38 years, his marital status as married, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 10 stone, with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was recorded as being Anglican.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as Mrs E. M. Watts, C/o J. Dumbrell, Walla Walla N.S.W.

He completed his medical examination at Gilgandra on 14th October 1915 (4 days after the Coo-ees left Gilgandra).  He travelled to Dubbo Army Camp – the nearest place he could enlist, and was attested at Dubbo on 17th October 1915.

The Gilgandra Weekly reported on 3rd December 1915 that prior to enlisting Watts had been ‘employed by Mr Utley, a district sawmiller’, and that ‘he left Gilgandra for the Dubbo Depot Camp, where he enlisted on October 16. The next day he entrained to Wellington and joined the Coo-ees’.[2]

The Coo-ees had a rest day in Wellington on 17th October 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 17th November 1915 Private Watts of the “Coo-ees” went before a Medical Board at Liverpool Camp, where he was found to be unfit for active service due to varicose veins.

Private Watts was discharged medically unfit on 29th November 1915.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WATTS WALTER JAMES

[2] ‘An aftermath’, Gilgandra Weekly, 3 December 1915, p. 10. Retrieved August 11, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119922362

 

Robert John SLOEY

Robert John SLOEY

Per his military service record (Depot), Robert John Sloey was born in Wellington, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as book-keeper.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 7 3/8 inches tall, weight 10 stone 7 lbs., with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed he had previous service in the Byrock Rifle Club, and that he had been rejected as unfit for military service once before due to eyesight.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as Mr and Mrs R. J. Sloey, Maxwell Street, Wellington N.S.W.

He appears to have joined the Coo-ee March somewhere between Wellington and Molong. ‘R. J. Sloey’ was reported in the Molong Express and Western District Advertiser on 23rd October 1915 as being one of six recruits that joined the Coo-ee March ‘on the road from Wellington’.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Orange on 24th October 1915.  He was attested at by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Orange on 24th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees rested at Orange).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

His Statement of Service records that on 9th January 1916 Private Sloey deserted from Liverpool Camp. A warrant was issued for his arrest on 16th February 1916. The warrant was withdrawn on 30th January 1919.

 

[1]NAA: B2455, SLOEY ROBERT JOHN

[2] The “Coo-ees” Come. (1915, October 23). Molong Express and Western District Advertiser (NSW : 1887 – 1954), p. 10. Retrieved August 11, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article101050484

 

 

Frederick JENNINGS

Frederick JENNINGS

Per his military service record (Depot), Frederick Jennings was born in New York.[1] He gave his age as 40 years and 3 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer & sailor. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 10 stone, with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was recorded as being  Church of England. He claimed that 3 years previous military experience apprenticed in the American Army.

His next of kin was recorded on his Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as his brother, Michael Jennings, New York, U.S.A.

Frederick Jennings stated in a Statutory Declaration in his service record that he joined the Route March of recruits marching from Gilgandra to Sydney at Wellington.  He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915, and was attested at Wellington on 18th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 17th November 1915. Private Jennings went before a Medical Board at Liverpool Camp, where he was found to be unfit for military service due to Varicose Veins.

Private Jennings was discharged medically unfit on 29th November 1915.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, JENNINGS FREDERICK

Arthur Joseph CUMMINGS

Arthur Joseph CUMMINGS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 6125), Arthur Joseph Cummings was born at Redfern, Sydney, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 22 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 122 lbs., with a dark complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915. He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Mumbil on 19th October 1915.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp until 9th January 1916, when his service record records him as being a deserter.

His service record shows he recommenced his military service in the A.I.F., in the 1st Battalion at Liverpool Camp on 7th June 1916.

On 22nd August 1916 Private Cummings departed Sydney on the HMAT Wiltshire A18, as part of the 19th reinforcements for the 1st Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 9 Centre Street, Redfern, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his father, A. [Arthur] Cummings, at the same address.[2]

He disembarked at Freemantle in Western Australia on 30th August 1916, where he was sent to hospital sick.

He was discharged on 31st October 1916 and sent to the Black Boy Army Camp in Western Australia.

On 21st November 1916 he was transferred to the Rockingham Army Camp.

On 30th December 1916 Private Cummings was charged with failing to answer roll call at 1400 and failing to report for morning treatment at hospital. He was fined 2 Shillings and Six Pence.

On 9th February 1917 he was transferred to the Karrakatta Army Camp in Western Australia.

On 23rd February 1917 Private Cummings was charged with overstaying his leave from 2300 on the 23rd of February 1917 till 0700 on 23rd February 1917. He was fined 5 shillings, and forfeited 6 days pay.

On 4th March 1917 Private Cummings was charged with breaking away from escort whilst in detention. He was fined 5 pounds and sentenced to 128 hours detention.

On 13th April 1917 he was charged with being absent without leave from 2300 on 1st April 1917 till apprehended by the Military Police at 1000 on 11th April 1917. He forfeited 10 days pay, and was sentenced to 168 hours detention.

On 4th May 1917 Private Cummings was charged with being absent without leave from 27th April 1917 till being apprehended in Charles Street, Perth, by the Military Police at 1100 on 4th May 1917. He was fined 8 days pay and sentenced to 8 days detention.

On 17th May 1917 Private Cummings was charged with overstaying his leave from midnight on 13th   May 1917 till arrested in Perth at 2040 on 17th May 1917, creating a disturbance on a train, violently resisting and breaking arrest, and remaining absent till arrested in Perth. He was fined 4 days pay and sentenced to 28 days detention.

On 24th May 1917 Private Cummings was charged with being in possession of tobacco and pipe in detention barracks at Freemantle. He was sentenced to 2 days bread and water

On 19th June 1917 Private Cummings was charged with overstaying his leave from midnight on 14th June 1917 till 0900 on 19th June 1917. He was fined 6 days pay and sentenced to 6 days confined to camp.

On 20th June 1917 Private Cummings with whilst a defaulter remaining absent from1800 on 20th June 1917 till arrested by the military Police at 1315 on 23rd June 1917. He  forfeited 3 days pay, and was sentenced to 168 hours detention.

On 29th June 1917 Private Cummings departed Freemantle aboard the HMAT Borda A30 bound for England, with the 8th reinforcements 44th Infantry Battalion.

He arrived at Plymouth, England, on 25th August 1917.

On 26th August 1917 Private Cummings marched into the 11th Training Battalion at Durrington, England.

On 11th October 1917 Private Cumming was admitted to Sutton Veny Military Hospital with diarrhoea.  He was discharged to the 1st Training Battalion at Sutton Veny on 16th October 1917.

On 3rd December 1917 Private Cummings was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 20th November 1917 till arrested by the Civil Police in London at 1030 on 29th November 1917. He was awarded 9 days field punishment number 2 and fined 21 days pay.

On  23rd January 1918 Private Cummings departed Southampton, England, bound for France. He joined  the 1st Battalion when it was in the trenches in the vicinity of Messines, Belgium, on 26th  January 1918.

On 7th March 1918 the 1st Battalion was manning the front line in the vicinity of Hollebeke, Belgium, when Private Cummings was evacuated sick with bronchial catarrh.

On 2nd April 1918 he was transferred from the 9th Canadian Stationery Hospital to No. 1 Convalescent Camp at Boulogne.

On 11th April 1918 Private Cummings was at the No. 1 Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France, where he was charged with being dirty on parade and smoking on parade, on 10th April 1918. He was fined one days pay.

On 21st April 1918 he was discharge to the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Havre, France.

On 18th May 1918 Private Cummings departed France bound for England classed B2.

He arrived at the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England, on 19th May 1918.

On 31st May 1918 he marched out to No. 4 Convalescent Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 12th July 1918 Private Cummings went to the Camp Isolation Hospital sick with Scabies.

On 23rd July 1918 Private Cummings was charged with being absent without leave from 28th June 1918 till being apprehended in London on 8th July 1918.  He was also charged with resisting escort, and assault.  He was sentenced to 105 days detention.

On 24th July 1918 Private Cummings was admitted to the detention ward of the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England.

He was discharged on 5th August 1918 and sent to the Detention Barracks at Lewes, England.

On 24th October 1918 the remainder of Private Cummings sentence was remitted, and he was released from Lewes and sent to the No. 4 Command Depot.

On 7th December 1918 Private Cummings was charged with being absent without leave from 2130 on 18th November 1918 till 27th November 1918. He was awarded 18 days field punishment no.  2 and fined 32 days pay.

Private Cummings departed England aboard the H.T.  Aneas on 18th December 1918 with debility, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 11th February 1919, and was discharged medically unfit on 11th May 1919.

 

[1]  NAA: B2455, CUMMINGS A J

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Arthur Joseph Cummings, HMAT Wiltshire A18, 22nd August 1916.

 

Ernest TATTERSALL

Ernest TATTERSALL

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4904), Ernest Tattersall was born at Parkes, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 31 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 154 lbs., with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

A letter from his sister in his service record states that ‘He enlisted at Wellington with the Coo-ees’. [2] He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915. He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Mumbil on 19th October 1915.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 3rd February 1916 Private Tattersall was charged with being absent without leave from Liverpool Camp. He was fined 10 shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Piesley Street, Orange, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his sister Mrs. F. Phillips, at the same address.[3]

On 8th March 1916 Private Tattersall departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On the 16th of April 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On 4th June 1916 Private Tattersall left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Tattersall served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France until 14th October 1916, when he was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from an ulcer to the left leg. He was moved back to the 10th Casualty Clearing Station. On 15th October 1916 he was placed aboard the 23rd Ambulance Train for evacuation to the 25th General Hospital at Hardelot, France, where he was admitted on 16th October 1916.

On 20th October 1916 Private Tattersall was placed aboard the Hospital Ship St David at Boulogne for evacuation to England. On 21st October 1916 he was admitted to the Tonbridge General Hospital.

He was discharged from hospital on 23rd November 1916 for leave until 8th December 1916.  He marched in to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England, on 9th December 1916.

On 12th January 1917 Private Tattersall went before a Medical Board where he was classified as C2 [unfit for overseas temporarily unfit for home service].

On 10th April 1917 Private Tattersall was transferred to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.  A document in his service record dated 10th April 1917 at Weymouth noted ‘Old injury L. leg. Leg swells after marching’.

On 17th April 1917 Private Tattersall was detached for duty with the Ordinance Depot at Bhurtpore Barracks, Tidworth.

On 22nd July 1917 Private Tattersall left England on the H.T. Nestor bound for Australia.

He arrived at Sydney on 25th September 1917, and was discharged Medically Unfit on 24th October 1917, with a compound fracture to the left leg [pre-existing injury from 10 years before].

Note: Ernest Tattersall died from Pneumonic Influenza in Sydney on 14th March 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, TATTERSALL ERNEST

[2] NAA: B2455, TATTERSALL ERNEST, letter from Mrs F. Phillips to Officer in Charge, Base Records Office, Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria, 24th August 1916.

[3] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Ernest Tattersall, HMAT Star of England A15, 8 March 1916.