Tag Archives: Wellington recruits

John BARTLEY

John BARTLEY

Per his military service record (Depot), John Bartley was born at Ballarat, Victoria.[1] He gave his age as 33 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as shearer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 168 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (when the Coo-ees were at Wellington). He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Mumbil on 19th October 1915.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as Charlotte Crougey, Osborne Street, Williamstown, Melbourne, Victoria.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp.

On 17th November 1915 Private Bartley went before a medical Board at Liverpool Camp where he was deemed as unfit for military service due to defective vision.

Private Bartley was discharged medically unfit on 29th November 1915.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, BARTLEY J

Walter James WATTS

Walter James WATTS

Per his military service record (Depot), Walter James Watts was born at Hay, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 38 years, his marital status as married, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 10 stone, with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was recorded as being Anglican.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as Mrs E. M. Watts, C/o J. Dumbrell, Walla Walla N.S.W.

He completed his medical examination at Gilgandra on 14th October 1915 (4 days after the Coo-ees left Gilgandra).  He travelled to Dubbo Army Camp – the nearest place he could enlist, and was attested at Dubbo on 17th October 1915.

The Gilgandra Weekly reported on 3rd December 1915 that prior to enlisting Watts had been ‘employed by Mr Utley, a district sawmiller’, and that ‘he left Gilgandra for the Dubbo Depot Camp, where he enlisted on October 16. The next day he entrained to Wellington and joined the Coo-ees’.[2]

The Coo-ees had a rest day in Wellington on 17th October 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 17th November 1915 Private Watts of the “Coo-ees” went before a Medical Board at Liverpool Camp, where he was found to be unfit for active service due to varicose veins.

Private Watts was discharged medically unfit on 29th November 1915.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, WATTS WALTER JAMES

[2] ‘An aftermath’, Gilgandra Weekly, 3 December 1915, p. 10. Retrieved August 11, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119922362

 

Robert John SLOEY

Robert John SLOEY

Per his military service record (Depot), Robert John Sloey was born in Wellington, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as book-keeper.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 7 3/8 inches tall, weight 10 stone 7 lbs., with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed he had previous service in the Byrock Rifle Club, and that he had been rejected as unfit for military service once before due to eyesight.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as Mr and Mrs R. J. Sloey, Maxwell Street, Wellington N.S.W.

He appears to have joined the Coo-ee March somewhere between Wellington and Molong. ‘R. J. Sloey’ was reported in the Molong Express and Western District Advertiser on 23rd October 1915 as being one of six recruits that joined the Coo-ee March ‘on the road from Wellington’.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Orange on 24th October 1915.  He was attested at by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Orange on 24th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees rested at Orange).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

His Statement of Service records that on 9th January 1916 Private Sloey deserted from Liverpool Camp. A warrant was issued for his arrest on 16th February 1916. The warrant was withdrawn on 30th January 1919.

 

[1]NAA: B2455, SLOEY ROBERT JOHN

[2] The “Coo-ees” Come. (1915, October 23). Molong Express and Western District Advertiser (NSW : 1887 – 1954), p. 10. Retrieved August 11, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article101050484

 

 

Frederick JENNINGS

Frederick JENNINGS

Per his military service record (Depot), Frederick Jennings was born in New York.[1] He gave his age as 40 years and 3 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer & sailor. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 10 stone, with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was recorded as being  Church of England. He claimed that 3 years previous military experience apprenticed in the American Army.

His next of kin was recorded on his Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as his brother, Michael Jennings, New York, U.S.A.

Frederick Jennings stated in a Statutory Declaration in his service record that he joined the Route March of recruits marching from Gilgandra to Sydney at Wellington.  He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915, and was attested at Wellington on 18th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 17th November 1915. Private Jennings went before a Medical Board at Liverpool Camp, where he was found to be unfit for military service due to Varicose Veins.

Private Jennings was discharged medically unfit on 29th November 1915.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, JENNINGS FREDERICK

Arthur Joseph CUMMINGS

Arthur Joseph CUMMINGS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 6125), Arthur Joseph Cummings was born at Redfern, Sydney, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 22 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 122 lbs., with a dark complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915. He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Mumbil on 19th October 1915.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp until 9th January 1916, when his service record records him as being a deserter.

His service record shows he recommenced his military service in the A.I.F., in the 1st Battalion at Liverpool Camp on 7th June 1916.

On 22nd August 1916 Private Cummings departed Sydney on the HMAT Wiltshire A18, as part of the 19th reinforcements for the 1st Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 9 Centre Street, Redfern, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his father, A. [Arthur] Cummings, at the same address.[2]

He disembarked at Freemantle in Western Australia on 30th August 1916, where he was sent to hospital sick.

He was discharged on 31st October 1916 and sent to the Black Boy Army Camp in Western Australia.

On 21st November 1916 he was transferred to the Rockingham Army Camp.

On 30th December 1916 Private Cummings was charged with failing to answer roll call at 1400 and failing to report for morning treatment at hospital. He was fined 2 Shillings and Six Pence.

On 9th February 1917 he was transferred to the Karrakatta Army Camp in Western Australia.

On 23rd February 1917 Private Cummings was charged with overstaying his leave from 2300 on the 23rd of February 1917 till 0700 on 23rd February 1917. He was fined 5 shillings, and forfeited 6 days pay.

On 4th March 1917 Private Cummings was charged with breaking away from escort whilst in detention. He was fined 5 pounds and sentenced to 128 hours detention.

On 13th April 1917 he was charged with being absent without leave from 2300 on 1st April 1917 till apprehended by the Military Police at 1000 on 11th April 1917. He forfeited 10 days pay, and was sentenced to 168 hours detention.

On 4th May 1917 Private Cummings was charged with being absent without leave from 27th April 1917 till being apprehended in Charles Street, Perth, by the Military Police at 1100 on 4th May 1917. He was fined 8 days pay and sentenced to 8 days detention.

On 17th May 1917 Private Cummings was charged with overstaying his leave from midnight on 13th   May 1917 till arrested in Perth at 2040 on 17th May 1917, creating a disturbance on a train, violently resisting and breaking arrest, and remaining absent till arrested in Perth. He was fined 4 days pay and sentenced to 28 days detention.

On 24th May 1917 Private Cummings was charged with being in possession of tobacco and pipe in detention barracks at Freemantle. He was sentenced to 2 days bread and water

On 19th June 1917 Private Cummings was charged with overstaying his leave from midnight on 14th June 1917 till 0900 on 19th June 1917. He was fined 6 days pay and sentenced to 6 days confined to camp.

On 20th June 1917 Private Cummings with whilst a defaulter remaining absent from1800 on 20th June 1917 till arrested by the military Police at 1315 on 23rd June 1917. He  forfeited 3 days pay, and was sentenced to 168 hours detention.

On 29th June 1917 Private Cummings departed Freemantle aboard the HMAT Borda A30 bound for England, with the 8th reinforcements 44th Infantry Battalion.

He arrived at Plymouth, England, on 25th August 1917.

On 26th August 1917 Private Cummings marched into the 11th Training Battalion at Durrington, England.

On 11th October 1917 Private Cumming was admitted to Sutton Veny Military Hospital with diarrhoea.  He was discharged to the 1st Training Battalion at Sutton Veny on 16th October 1917.

On 3rd December 1917 Private Cummings was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 20th November 1917 till arrested by the Civil Police in London at 1030 on 29th November 1917. He was awarded 9 days field punishment number 2 and fined 21 days pay.

On  23rd January 1918 Private Cummings departed Southampton, England, bound for France. He joined  the 1st Battalion when it was in the trenches in the vicinity of Messines, Belgium, on 26th  January 1918.

On 7th March 1918 the 1st Battalion was manning the front line in the vicinity of Hollebeke, Belgium, when Private Cummings was evacuated sick with bronchial catarrh.

On 2nd April 1918 he was transferred from the 9th Canadian Stationery Hospital to No. 1 Convalescent Camp at Boulogne.

On 11th April 1918 Private Cummings was at the No. 1 Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France, where he was charged with being dirty on parade and smoking on parade, on 10th April 1918. He was fined one days pay.

On 21st April 1918 he was discharge to the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Havre, France.

On 18th May 1918 Private Cummings departed France bound for England classed B2.

He arrived at the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England, on 19th May 1918.

On 31st May 1918 he marched out to No. 4 Convalescent Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 12th July 1918 Private Cummings went to the Camp Isolation Hospital sick with Scabies.

On 23rd July 1918 Private Cummings was charged with being absent without leave from 28th June 1918 till being apprehended in London on 8th July 1918.  He was also charged with resisting escort, and assault.  He was sentenced to 105 days detention.

On 24th July 1918 Private Cummings was admitted to the detention ward of the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England.

He was discharged on 5th August 1918 and sent to the Detention Barracks at Lewes, England.

On 24th October 1918 the remainder of Private Cummings sentence was remitted, and he was released from Lewes and sent to the No. 4 Command Depot.

On 7th December 1918 Private Cummings was charged with being absent without leave from 2130 on 18th November 1918 till 27th November 1918. He was awarded 18 days field punishment no.  2 and fined 32 days pay.

Private Cummings departed England aboard the H.T.  Aneas on 18th December 1918 with debility, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 11th February 1919, and was discharged medically unfit on 11th May 1919.

 

[1]  NAA: B2455, CUMMINGS A J

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Arthur Joseph Cummings, HMAT Wiltshire A18, 22nd August 1916.

 

Ernest TATTERSALL

Ernest TATTERSALL

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4904), Ernest Tattersall was born at Parkes, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 31 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 154 lbs., with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

A letter from his sister in his service record states that ‘He enlisted at Wellington with the Coo-ees’. [2] He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 16th October 1915. He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Mumbil on 19th October 1915.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 3rd February 1916 Private Tattersall was charged with being absent without leave from Liverpool Camp. He was fined 10 shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Piesley Street, Orange, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his sister Mrs. F. Phillips, at the same address.[3]

On 8th March 1916 Private Tattersall departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On the 16th of April 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On 4th June 1916 Private Tattersall left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Tattersall served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France until 14th October 1916, when he was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from an ulcer to the left leg. He was moved back to the 10th Casualty Clearing Station. On 15th October 1916 he was placed aboard the 23rd Ambulance Train for evacuation to the 25th General Hospital at Hardelot, France, where he was admitted on 16th October 1916.

On 20th October 1916 Private Tattersall was placed aboard the Hospital Ship St David at Boulogne for evacuation to England. On 21st October 1916 he was admitted to the Tonbridge General Hospital.

He was discharged from hospital on 23rd November 1916 for leave until 8th December 1916.  He marched in to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England, on 9th December 1916.

On 12th January 1917 Private Tattersall went before a Medical Board where he was classified as C2 [unfit for overseas temporarily unfit for home service].

On 10th April 1917 Private Tattersall was transferred to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.  A document in his service record dated 10th April 1917 at Weymouth noted ‘Old injury L. leg. Leg swells after marching’.

On 17th April 1917 Private Tattersall was detached for duty with the Ordinance Depot at Bhurtpore Barracks, Tidworth.

On 22nd July 1917 Private Tattersall left England on the H.T. Nestor bound for Australia.

He arrived at Sydney on 25th September 1917, and was discharged Medically Unfit on 24th October 1917, with a compound fracture to the left leg [pre-existing injury from 10 years before].

Note: Ernest Tattersall died from Pneumonic Influenza in Sydney on 14th March 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, TATTERSALL ERNEST

[2] NAA: B2455, TATTERSALL ERNEST, letter from Mrs F. Phillips to Officer in Charge, Base Records Office, Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria, 24th August 1916.

[3] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Ernest Tattersall, HMAT Star of England A15, 8 March 1916.

 

Herbert William SPICER

Herbert William SPICER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4897), ‘William Herbert Spicer’ was born at Wimmin, Victoria.[1]  (He signed his name Herbert William Spicer on his Attestation Paper, and other official records record his name as Herbert William Spicer, so it appears  his first and middle name may have not have been recorded in the correct order  on his service record). [2] He gave his age as 21 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farm labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 9 stone 6 lbs., with a fair complexion, gray eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his Certificate of Medical Examination at Gilgandra on 12th October 1915, two days after the commencement of the Coo-ee March.  It is not clear exactly where he caught up with the Coo-ees, but he had joined them by the time they arrived at Wellington, as his Certificate of Medical Examination was co-signed at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at that town).  He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 20th October 1915.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On the 31st of January 1916 Private Spicer was charged with being absent from parade. He was fined 5 shillings.

The Dimboola Banner and Wimmera and Mallee Advertiser reported on 31st March 1916 that ‘Private Herbert Spencer, youngest son of Mr F. W. Spicer, of Lochiel, who enlisted at Gilgandra, N.S.W., was one of the famous “Coo-ees,” who marched 320 miles to Sydney’.[3]  This information was provided to this newspaper by his brother-in-law, Mr. A. A. Fechner, formerly of Dimboola, who had moved to Gilgandra with his wife Lily (Herbert’s sister) about 1911.[4]

‘H. Spicer’ was presented with a watch and a wallet at a send-off held for the Gilgandra Coo-ees at the Australian Hall in Gilgandra on Friday 3rd March 1916.[5]

His name was recorded as ‘Herbert Spicer’ on his embarkation roll, and his address at time of enrolment was ‘Gilgandra’.  His next of kin was listed as his father, F. [Frederick William] Spicer, Dimboola, Victoria.

On 8th March 1916 Private Spicer departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company (along with fellow Coo-ees Private Richardson and Private Megarrity).

On 17th June 1916 Private Spicer left Alexandria aboard the Transport Manitou bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 25th June 1916.

On 8th July 1916 Private Spicer was attached to the 2nd ANZAC Headquarters as escort to the G.O.C. [General Officer Commanding] in France.  He was detached to join the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 28th September 1916.

On 10th October 1916 Private Spicer commenced a training course at the Signals School. He returned to his unit on 27th December 1916.

On 3rd February 1917 Private Spicer was charged with conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline, in that he did upon being issued with his rum contrary to regulations, hand it to another soldier. He was awarded 3 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 26th March 1917 Private Spicer was detached for duty with the 2nd ANZAC Corps Anti-Aircraft Section.

He returned to his unit from this detachment on 19th of May 1917.

On 21st May 1917 he was detached for duty with the A.P.M. [Assistant Provost Marshal] 2nd ANZAC Corps.  He rejoined his unit on 5th June 1917.

On 23rd July 1917 he was sent to the Power Buzzer School. He returned to his unit on 1st August 1917.

On 4th August 1917 Private Spicer went on leave.  He returned from leave on 16th August 1917.

On 10th September 1917 the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion commenced work burying cable in the vicinity of La Clytte, Belgium, when the working parties came under attack by gas shelling.[6] Private Spicer was one of 43 men in his unit evacuated the next day with mustard gas poisoning. He was taken first to the 103rd Field Ambulance, then to the 9th Casualty Clearing Station, and the 11th Casualty Clearing Station.

On 12th September 1917 Private Spicer was placed aboard the 21st Ambulance Train for evacuation to the 53rd General Hospital at Boulogne, France.

On 23rd September 1917 he was transferred to the 1st Convalescent Depot at Boulogne. On 25th September 1917 he was transferred to the 10th Convalescent Depot.

On 18th November  1917 Private Spicer marched into the Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He rejoined his Battalion on 25th November 1917.

On 30th November 1917 Private Spicer was sent to the 43rd Field Ambulance, then back to the 10th Casualty Clearing Station sick. On 1st December 1917 he was placed aboard the 5th Ambulance Train.  He arrived at the 9th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France, on 2nd December 1917. On 4th December 1917 he was transferred to the 29th General Hospital at Boulogne.

He was discharged to Base Depot on 2nd February 1918. He rejoined his Battalion on 7th February 1918.

On 25th March 1918 Private Spicer was detached for duty with the 1st Australian Division Signals Company.

On 13th September 1918 Private Spicer went on leave to England.  He returned from leave on 29th September 1918.

On 24th January 1919 Private Spicer was officially transferred to the 1st Australian Division Signals Company.

On 4th June 1919 Private Spicer departed France to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at No. 1 Group at Longbridge, England, on 5th June 1919.

On 4th July 1919 Private Spicer departed England aboard the H.T. Norman bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 20th August 1919, and was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 12th October 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, SPICER HERBERT WILLIAM

[2] Herbert William Spicer, Victorian Birth Registration, 1896, Reg. no. 22234.

[3] ‘News and Notes’, Dimboola Banner and Wimmera and Mallee Advertiser,  31 March 1916, p. 2. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article152834929

[4] ‘Obituary’, Gilgandra Weekly and Castlereagh, 18 June 1936, p. 4. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113030512

[5] ‘Our Soldiers’ Column’, Gilgandra Weekly, 10 March 1916, p. 14. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119923509

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 12/2 – 2nd ANZAC Corps Cyclist Battalion, AWM4 12/2/15 – September 1917.

Clarence William STEWART

Clarence William STEWART

Per his military service record (5222), Clarence William Stewart was born at Hargraves, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 151 lbs, with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  His next of kin on his Attestation paper was recorded as his mother, Mrs Mary Stewart, Hargraves, N.S.W.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 25th October 1915, (7 days after the Coo-ees had left that town), then travelled to Blayney to catch up with the Coo-ees.  He was attested by Captain Eade at Blayney on 26th October 1915.  He claimed to have no previous military experience.

‘C. W. Stewart’ was named in the Bathurst Times as one of the Wellington recruits that joined the Coo-ees at Blayney on 26th October 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 2nd February 1916 Private Stewart was charged with being absent without leave for 6 days. He was fined 30 shillings.

On 7th February 1916 Private Stewart was charged with being absent from special picquet. He was fined 10 shillings.

On 22nd February 1916 Private Stewart was charged with being absent from parade. He was fined 5 shillings.

His mother sent a letter  dated 29th March 1916 requesting her underage son be discharged from the A.I.F., in which she stated: ‘’In reference to my son Clarrie … I now find it my absolute duty to ask you, please, to discharge him at once as it is a case of necessity I cannot allow him to stay in any longer. If at any time when he is twenty one, he has the same patriotic feelings, he may, with my consent, re-enlist”.[3]

A copy of his birth certificate was also provided, dated 28th March 1916, which showed that his date of birth was 17th October 1897.[4] Clarence William Stewart therefore had only been 18 years and 9 days old when he enlisted on 26th October 1915 (and not 21 years of age as stated on his Attestation paper).

On 7th April 1916 Private Stewart was discharged at his mother’s request.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, STEWART C W

[2] ‘Western news’, The Bathurst Times,  27 October 1915,  p. 3. Retrieved January 3, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111244211

[3] NAA: B2455, STEWART C W, letter to O.C., A Company, 13 Battalion, from M. Stewart, 29 March 1916.

[4] NAA: B2455, STEWART C W, Birth Certificate.

Daniel LYNCH

Daniel LYNCH

Per his military service record (regimental no. 5403), Daniel Lynch was born at Orange, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 44 years and 3 months (although he appears to have been much older), his marital status as married, and his occupation as telegraph linesman.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 6 feet 2 inches tall (so he was one of the tallest of the Coo-ees), weight 12 stone, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.  He completed his medical examination on 16th October 1915 at Wellington (while the Coo-ees were at Wellington), and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Stuart Town on 19th October 1915.

He was named (as “Lynch, D”) in the Wellington Times as one of the men who enlisted with the Coo-ees at Wellington.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as 15th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Whilst at the Liverpool Camp Private Lynch was charged with using obscene language to an NCO.  He was fined 1 Pound.  He was also absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp from the 18th to 31st January 1916, and from 1st to the 8th February 1916, a total of 22 days.

Private Lynch was involved in hearing at the Central Police Court on 25th January 1916, followed by a court case on 6th March 1916 at the Darlinghurst Quarter Sessions, in which another Coo-ee was charged with, and subsequently found guilty of, having assaulted him at Central Railway Station about midnight on January 16th 1916, and robbed him of two pounds.[3]

Private Lynch was transferred to 17th Reinforcement for the 13th Battalion in early 1916.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Percy Street, Wellington, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs M. E. [Mary Ellen] Lynch, at the same address.

On 9th April 1916 Private Lynch departed Sydney on the HMAT Nestor A71 (along with several other Coo-ees), bound for Egypt.

Photograph of HMAT A71 Nestor loaded with troops on an earlier voyage, taken 11 October 1915.  Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. PB0607.

Photograph of HMAT A71 Nestor loaded with troops on an earlier voyage, taken 11 October 1915. Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. PB0607.

On the 5th of June 1916 he was admitted to the 3rd Australian General Hospital at Abbassia, Egypt with injured ribs.  He was discharged on 20th June 1916.

On 2nd August 1916 Private Lynch was charged with being absent without leave from 1700 parade at Tel-el-Kebir.  He was awarded 3 days field punishment number 2.

On 6th August 1916 Private Lynch departed Egypt bound for England aboard the Transport Megantic.

On 22nd September 1916 Private Lynch departed the 4th Training Battalion in England bound for France.

He marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, on 24th September 1916.

A few weeks later, on 15th October 1916 Private Lynch was admitted to the 26th General Hospital at Etaples, France, suffering Rheumatism.

On 23rd October 1916 Private Lynch was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Stad Antwerpen at Boulogne, for transfer to England.  He was admitted to the Western Heights Military Hospital at Dover later that day.

On 30th October 1916 Private Lynch was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England, with Myalgia.  A Medical Report of an Invalid form dated 1st November 1916 at this hospital in his service record listed his ‘true age’ as 51 years. (If this was his correct age at that time, it means he would actually have been about 50 years of age when he enlisted with the Coo-ees).

On 12th November 1916 Private Lynch was discharged and marched into the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 12th March 1917 Private Lynch was charged with being absent without leave in London from 2nd March 1917 till apprehended by the Military Police on 8th March 1917.  He was awarded 7 days confined to barracks and fined 7 days pay.

On 17th March 1917 Private Lynch departed England from Plymouth aboard the H.T. Beltana bound for Australia, for discharge over age and debility.

He arrived in Sydney on 15th May 1917.  Private Lynch was discharged medically unfit on 11th June 1917.

[1] NAA: B2455, LYNCH DANIEL

[2] ‘Hitchen’s Coo-ees’, Wellington Times, 18 October 1915, p. 3. Retrieved March 1, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388424

[3] ‘Soldier Charged’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 January 1916, p. 6. Retrieved March 1, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28782852  ;’Coo-ees in a Brawl’, The Sun, 6 March 1916, p. 5 (Final Extra). Retrieved March 1, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221356476

David James O’ROURKE

David James O’ROURKE

David James O'Rourke. Photograph courtesy of Warren O'Rourke.

David James O’Rourke (Photograph courtesy of Warren O’Rourke)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2043), David James O’Rourke was born at Mudgee, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 18 years and 4 months [though he was much younger], his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His mother Mrs Harriet Ann Lonergan signed the consent of parents or guardians section on his initial Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form.  His description on his Certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 155 lbs., with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and auburn hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.

He completed his medical examination at Wellington on 18th October 1915 (when the Coo-ees were at Wellington), and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Stuart Town on 19th October 1915.  He claimed he had no previous military service.

After completing the march he went to Menangle Park Camp as reinforcement for the 1st Light Horse Regiment.

On 1st June 1916 he was reallocated as a reinforcement for the 12th Light Horse Regiment.

On his embarkation roll his address as time of enrolment was Arthur Street, Wellington, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs Harriet Ann Lonergan, at the same address.

Trooper O’Rourke departed Melbourne on the HMAT A6 Clan Maccorquodale on 19th September 1916, with the 13th Reinforcements for the 12th Light Horse Regiment.

He arrived at Suez, Egypt, on 19th October 1916.  The next day, Trooper O’Rourke was sent to the Isolation Camp at Moascar.

On 12th November 1916 he marched into the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Moascar.

On 24th February 1917 he was transferred to the 4th Light Horse Training Regiment.

On 15th March 1917 he was taken on strength of the 12th Light Horse Regiment whilst it was conducting training at Ferry Post, Egypt.

The following month, he was with the 12th Light Horse Regiment when it was involved in the Second Battle of Gaza 17th-19th April 1917.

On 26th August 1917 Trooper O’Rourke was detached to conduct guard duties at Khan Yunis.

On 29th August 1917 he was sent to the 65th Casualty Clearing Station with a septic throat.

On 6th of September 1917 he was transferred to the 24th Stationary Hospital with tonsillitis.

On 10th September 1917 he was admitted to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Abbassia, Egypt, with tonsillitis.

Trooper O’Rourke was discharged from hospital on 1st October 1917, and marched into the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment on 2nd October 1917.

He rejoined the 12th Light Horse Regiment on 25th October 1917 when it was at Fara, preparing for the Battle of Beersheba.  Trooper O’Rourke was with the 12th Light Horse Regiment when it participated in the Charge of Beersheba on 31st October 1917.  Casualties for the 12th Light Horse Regiment were reported in the Regiment’s War Diary the next day as as 20 men killed, 19 men wounded, 44 horses killed, and 60 horses wounded.[2]

The Wellington Times reported that his mother Mrs H. A. Lonergan was ‘in receipt of a cable from her son, Trooper David O’Rourke, stating that he had gone safely through the recent big battle in Palestine, and was quite well’, and that Trooper O’Rourke was ‘only 18’.[3]

On 2nd April 1918 the 12th Light Horse Regiment was at Jaffa where Trooper O’Rourke was part of a watering party, leading three horses, when a horse in front of him kicked him in the left knee, which caused a contusion of the femur & tibia with much swelling.  Trooper O’Rourke was sent to 4th Light Horse Field Ambulance, then on 3rd April 1918 to the 43rd Stationary Hospital.

On 5th April 1918 he was moved to the 44th Stationary Hospital at Kantara.  On 6th April 1918 he was transferred to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Port Said.

On 12th June 1918 Trooper O’Rourke was discharged from hospital, with a Medical Board classification of B3, due to his injured knee.  On 19th June 1918 he was assigned to duties at the Depot Stores at Gezira.

On 16th September 1918 Trooper O’Rourke was admitted to the 31st General Hospital at Cairo sick. He was transferred to a Convalescent Hospital at Helouan on 12th December 1918.

He rejoined the Depot Stores on 25th January 1919.

On 2nd August 1919 Trooper O’Rourke departed Kantara, to commence his return to Australia aboard the H.T. Delta.  He arrived in Australia on 3rd September 1919.

The Freeman’s Journal reported on 11th September 1919 that his mother Mrs T. Lonergan ‘has received word that her son, Trooper D. J. O’Rourke, was expected to arrive at Melbourne this week. Trooper O’Rourke was one of the youngest members who left with the Coo-ees, being only sixteen years and four months when he enlisted.  He went over with 12th Light Horse and saw 4 years service with them in Egypt and Palestine.  He came through all the engagements safe and sound, though he had some narrow escapes, his horse being shot from beneath him on one occasion’.[4]

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 19th October 1919.

[1] NAA: B2455, O’ROURKE DAVID JAMES

[2] AWM4 10/17/9 – October 1917, Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, 12th Australian Light Horse Regiment.

[3] ‘Personal Pars’, Wellington Times, 26 November 1917, p. 2. Retrieved September 13, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article137413032

[4] ‘The gossip of the week : round about Australia’, Freeman’s Journal, 11 September 1919, p. 23. Retrieved April 28, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page13246397