Tag Archives: Molong recruits

Robert GILCHRIST

Robert GILCHRIST

Per his initial military service record (Depot), Robert Gilchrist was born at Millthorpe, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 40 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 9 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 8 lbs, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed to have 4 weeks previous military experience at Holsworthy Camp, and that he had left through sickness.

His next of kin on his Attestation paper was his mother, Mrs Mary Gilchrist, McLaughlan Street, Orange N.S.W.

The Molong Argus reported that Robert Gilchrist stepped forward to join the Coo-ees at an open air recruiting meeting held at Euchareena on 20th October 1915.[2]

He completed his medical examination at Molong on 22nd October 1915, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at ‘Molong (8 miles east)’, along with several other Coo-ees, on 22nd October 1915.

On 31st October 1915 when the Coo-ees were having a rest day at Wallerawang, Private Gilchrist was charged  by Captain Eade with drunkenness. He was fined 30 shillings.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 19th November 1915 Private Gilchrist was charged with attempting to break guard. He was reprimanded.

On 7th December 1915 Private Gilchrist was charged with being absent without leave from Liverpool Camp from 3rd to 7th December 1915. He was recommended to be discharged.

Private Gilchrist was discharged on 10th December 1915 unlikely to become an efficient soldier.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, GILCHRIST R

[2] ‘The “Coo-ees” at Euchareena’, Molong Argus,  29 October 1915, p. 1. Retrieved August 7, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article105660892

Henry NEIRHOFF

Henry NEIRHOFF

Per his military service record (regimental no. 6836), Henry Neirhoff was born at Sydney, N.S.W.  He gave his age as 24 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 3 inches tall, weight 133 lbs, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and auburn hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.

‘H. Nierhoff’[sic] was named as being one of the ‘Wongarbon boys’ with the Coo-ees in the Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate.[1]  He may have been one of the thirteen men who stepped forward and gave his name, ‘either to march under Captain Nicholas, or to come after harvest’, when the Coo-ees recruited in Wongarbon on 14th October 1915.[2]

An initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form in his file was addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Wellington, and gave his postal address as Wongarbon, and was dated 17th October 1915 (the date the Coo-ees left Wellington).

‘H. Neirhoff’ was named as one of six men who joined the Coo-ees ‘on the road from Wellington’ in the Molong Express and Western District Advertiser.[3]

Henry Neirhoff completed his medical examination at Molong on 22nd October 1915, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at ‘Molong (8 miles east)’, along with several other Coo-ees, on 22nd October 1915.  He claimed to have no previous military experience.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as a reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On Monday 3rd January 1916 Private Neirhoff was presented with a wristlet watch by the people of Wongarbon as a send-off present at the Wongarbon Railway Station platform.[4]

On Private Neirhoff’s embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wongarbon, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his brother, R. [Rudolph] Neirhoff, Penshurst, N.S.W.

Private Neirhoff departed Sydney on the SS Port Nicholson on 8th November 1916 with the 22nd reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

He arrived at Devonport, England on 10th January 1917, and marched into the 4th Training Battalion at Codford, England.

On 16th February 1917 Private Neirhoff was charged with overstaying his leave from midnight 2nd February 1917 till noon 12th February 1917. He was sentenced to 10 days detention and fined 23 days pay.

On 27th February 1917 Private Neirhoff was sent to Bulford Hospital with Scabies. He was discharged on 6th March 1917.

On 22nd May 1917 Private Neirhoff departed from Southampton, England, bound for France.  He was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion on 10th June 1917, when it was in the front line in the vicinity of Messines, Belgium.

On 20th December 1917 a Field General Court Martial was held where Private Neirhoff was charged with desertion whilst on active service from Belgian Chateau camp on 23rd September 1917, to 7th November 1917.  He pleaded not guilty, and was found not guilty of desertion, but guilty of being absent without leave.  He was sentenced to 2 years hard labour.

On 3rd January 1918 Private Neirhoff was admitted to No. 4 Military Prison at Rouen, France, to commence his sentence.

On 31st October 1918 Private Neirhoff was sent to the 10th General Hospital at Rouen, France, suffering Piles.  He was sent back to prison on 9th November 1918.

On 4th February 1919 Private Neirhoff was released from prison with the unserved portion of his sentence suspended.  He rejoined the 13th Battalion on 12th February 1919.

On 4th March 1919 Private Neirhoff was detached for duty at the Corps workshop at Jeumont, France.

On 26th April 1919 he was sent to the Base Depot at Le Harve.

He departed France on 13th May 1919, and arrived in Southampton, England, on 14th of May 1919.

On 23rd July 1919 Private Neirhoff departed England aboard the H.M.A.T. Main, bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 15th October 1919, and was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 7th November 1919.

[1] ‘Our Soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 29 October 1915, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601711

[2] The Route March’, The Farmer and Settler, 19 October 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116648940

[3] ‘The “Coo-ees” Come’, Molong Express and Western District Advertiser, 23 October 1915, p. 10, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article101050484

[4] ‘Wongarbon Soldiers Farewelled’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 7 January 1916, p. 5, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77603646

Joseph William EDWARDS

Joseph William EDWARDS

Per his initial military service record (Depot), Joseph William Edwards was born at Marsden [near Forbes], N.S.W.  He signed his name as William Edwards.  He gave his age as 21 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as general labourer.  His description on his Certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 186 lbs, with a medium complexion, brown eyes, and black hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  His next of kin on his initial Attestation paper was his father, Joseph Benjamin Edwards, Gilgandra, N.S.W.  He completed his medical examination at Molong on 22nd October 1915, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at ‘Molong (8 miles east)’, along with several other Coo-ees, on 22nd October 1915.  He claimed to have no previous military experience.

‘W. Edwards’ was named as one of six men who joined the Coo-ees ‘on the road from Wellington’ in the Molong Express and Western District Advertiser.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Per his Detailed Medical History of an Invalid form dated 10th January 1916, he enlisted at Wellington, so it appears he first presented to join the Coo-ees when they were recruiting at Wellington.  This form recorded that on 4th January 1916 Private J. W. Edwards was at the Liverpool Railway Station when he jumped off a train on the wrong side and fell, and he suffered a hernia to his left oblique.  He was recommended to have an operation, however he declined.  The Medical Board subsequently found him unfit for military service, and recommended his discharge.

Private Edwards was discharged medically unfit on 15th January 1916.

Joseph William Edwards re-enlisted in the A.I.F. on 27th April 1916 at Dubbo, N.S.W., and he was appointed to Dubbo Depot Battalion.

He was transferred from Dubbo Depot Battalion to Invalids Section A.I.F. Victoria Barracks Sydney N.S.W. from 26th May 1916 to 9th August 1916.

He was transferred from Dubbo Depot Battalion to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 3rd Battalion on 20th September 1916.

On Private Edward’s embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wellington, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, J. B. Edwards, P.O., Wellington, N.S.W.

Private Edwards (regimental no. 6744) departed Sydney on the SS Port Nicholson on 8th November 1916 with the 22nd reinforcements for the 3rd Battalion.  He arrived at Devonport, England on 10th January 1917.

He was sent to the 1st Training Battalion at Larkhill, England.

On 10th April 1917 Private Edwards proceeded overseas to France from Folkestone, England.

On 30th April 1917 he marched out to his unit from the Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples.

On 2nd May 1917 Private Edwards was taken on strength of the 3rd Battalion when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Vaulx, France.

On 13th May 1917 Private Edwards was sent to hospital sick.  He rejoined the Battalion on 29th May 1917.

On 10th July 1917, the 3rd Battalion was conducting ‘recreational training and bomb throwing competitions’ at Buire, France, when 13 men in the Battalion were accidentally wounded by a bomb explosion.[2]  Private Edwards received a severe bomb wound to his back and left hand, and was transported by the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station.  On 23rd July he was admitted to the 1st General Hospital in France.

On 28th of July 1917 Private Edwards was placed aboard the H.T. Warilda for evacuation to England.

He was admitted to the 3rd Southern General Hospital at Oxford, England on 29th July 1917 with bomb wound back severe.

He was listed as ‘Wounded … Pte. J. W. Edwards (Wellington), dangerously’ in the ‘War Casualties’ list in the Evening News on 9th August 1917.[3]

On 30th August 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Darford, England.

On 3rd September 1917 Private Edwards was discharged from hospital and granted leave to report to Weymouth, England on 17th September 1917.

On 19th October 1917 Private Edwards departed England  to commence his return to Australia aboard the H.T. Port Lyttleton.  He arrived in Australia on 16th December 1917.

On 21st January 1918 Private Edwards was discharged medically unfit.

[1] ‘The “Coo-ees” Come’, Molong Express and Western District Advertiser, 23 October 1915, p. 10, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article101050484

[2] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/20 – 3rd Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/20/29 – July 1917.

[3] ‘War Casualties. New South Wales Losses. 329th List.’, Evening News, 9 August 1917, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article121255198

 

William Charles WALKER

William Charles WALKER

Per his initial military service record (4616), William Charles Walker was born at Norfolk, England. He gave his age as 22 years and 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 6 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 4 lbs, with a medium fair complexion, brown eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He had a tattoo mark of clasped hands and English and American flags on his right forearm. He completed his medical at Molong on 22nd October 1915, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Molong (8 miles east) on 22nd October 1915. He claimed to have no previous military experience.

It was reported in The Western Champion that the Parkes Recruiting Association had held a recruiting meeting ‘for the purpose of enrolling recruits who were willing to join the volunteers now on the way, by road, from Gilgandra to Sydney’, and that ‘five men had mounted the lorry in response to the appeal’, and that ‘one of them went on to Dubbo’, with the remaining four planning to proceed to Molong to join the contingent.[1] William Charles Walker was one of the four recruits sent by the Parkes Recruiting Association to join the Coo-ees at Molong.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wayvilla, Melford Street, Hurlstone Park, Sydney, N,S,W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, M. Walker, 6th St. Clement Street, Barnsbury, London, England.

On 16th February 1916 Private Walker was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916. On 1st April 1916 Private Walker was transferred to the 54th Battalion.

On 19th June 1916 Private Walker left Alexandria aboard H.T. Caledonian bound for France, and arrived at Marseilles on 29th June 1916.

Just three weeks later, on 19th/20th July 1916 Private Walker was wounded in action during the Battle of Fromelles, receiving a gunshot wound to his right arm. On 22nd July 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria at Boulogne, bound for England. On 23rd July 1916 he was admitted to the Southwark Military Hospital at East Dulwich, England.

He was discharged from hospital on 18th September 1916 and marched into the 14th Training Battalion.

His service record holds a certified extract of a marriage certificate for William Charles Walker and Jessie Elizabeth Browning at the Parish of St. James Church, Islington, dated 16th December 1916.

On 22nd February 1917 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from Tattoo on 2nd February 1917 till 0850 on 18th February 1917. He was awarded 17 days detention and fined 31 days pay.

On 16th March 1917 Private Walker was admitted to the Wareham Isolation Hospital suffering from Mumps. He was discharged and sent to the Number 4 Command Depot on 4th April 1917.

On 28th April 1917 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from Tattoo from 18th April 1917 until 22rd April 1917. He was awarded 6 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 16 days pay.

On 10th May 1917 Private Walker was transferred to the 61st Battalion.

On 6th July 1917 Private Walker went before a District Court Martial at Hurdcott charged with being absent without leave from Tattoo from 12th May 1917 till apprehended by the Military Police at 2030 on 12th June 1917. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 60 days detention and fined 115 days pay. He was sent to the Wadsworth detention barracks to undergo his sentence. He was released from Wadsworth Detention Barracks on 27th August 1917 and marched into the 61st Battalion.

On 13th September 1917 Private Walker departed Southampton bound for France, to reinforce the 54th Battalion. He marched into his unit in the 54th Battalion in France on 2nd October 1917.

On 30th January 1918 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from 9 pm on 21st November 1917 till apprehended by the Military Police at 11 am on 11th December 1917. He was awarded 24 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 45 days pay.

A letter in his service record from his mother dated 15th October 1919 advised that his father, Matthew Walker, was killed in an air raid in London on 28th January 1918.

On 5th February 1918 Private Walker proceeded to the UK on leave. On 20th February 1918 he was granted an extension of leave from 20th to 27th February 1918.

On 4th April 1918 Private Walker went before a District Court Martial held at 58 Warwick Square, London, charged with being absent without leave in that he failed to report to the RTO at Victoria Station at 7.30am on 27th February 1918 until he surrendered himself to the civil police on 24th March 1918. He was fined 37 days pay.

On 23rd April 1918 Private Walker went before another District Court Martial held at Warwick Square charged with deserting His Majesty’s Service on 7th April 1918 by failing to proceed overseas to join his unit in France as it was his duty to do and remained absent without leave till apprehended by the Civil Police in London on 15th April 1918. He pleaded not guilty and was found guilty. He was sentenced to 6 months detention and fined 199 days pay.

On 24th April 1918 Private Walker marched into the Lewes Detention barracks to undergo his sentence.

On 15th August 1918 he was discharged from detention with the remainder of his sentence suspended, to march into Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

His service record shows that he was reported absent without leave again a week later.

On 12th November 1918 Private Walker went before a District Court Martial charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 22nd August 1918 till 0730 on 3rd October 1918 (when he returned), then being absent without leave from 0900 on 12th October 1918 till 0930 on 2nd November 1918. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 120 days detention.

On 27th November 1918 Private Walker marched into the Lewes Detention barracks to undergo his sentence. On 13th February 1919 he was released from detention with the remainder of his sentence suspended, to the 54th Battalion.

On 6th March 1919 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from 1400 on 17th February 1919 till 1700 on 28th February 1919. The matter was dismissed.

On 15th March 1919 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from 0900 on 11th March 1919 till 1200 on 14th March 1919. He was awarded 5 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 9 days pay.

On 19th April 1919 Private Walker was charged with being absent without leave from 13th April 1919 to 17th April 1919. The case was dismissed.

On 17th July 1919 Private Walker was admitted to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England. He was discharged on 21st July 1919.

On 24th August 1919 Private Walker was “granted indefinite leave awaiting, awaiting a family ship”.

Private Walker applied for discharge in the U.K., his reason stated in his Application for a Discharge in a Country other than Australia, dated 8th September 1919, as: “My wife now being pregnant I think it wise for me to stay in England. My mother also getting on in years and her being a widow, I think it my duty to try and comfort her, but if returned to Australia, it would cause inconvenience on both sides. I can obtain employment, my relations are holding business in London. I must note the fact that my father was killed in an Air Raid over London on 28.1.18”.

This application was approved, and he was discharged in London on 18th December 1919.

[1] ‘Marching to Sydney’, Western Champion, 21 October 1915, p. 19, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112309615

 

 

William Henry NICHOLLS

William Henry NICHOLLS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2369), William Henry Nicholls was born at Camperdown, Sydney, N.S.W. He gave his age as 27 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as contractor. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 143 lbs., with a fair complexion, green eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had 12 months experience in the school cadets.

He completed his medical on the 2nd October 1915 at Coonamble, and was attested at Coonamble on the 21s October 1915. However another Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form in his service record was made at Dubbo on 21st October 1915 (after the Coo-ee March had passed through this town), and his medical examination form dated 2nd October 1915 at Coonamble is countersigned by Dr. E.H. Burkett at Dubbo and dated 21st October 1915.

William Henry Nicholls was reported to have been ‘one of the Coo-ees’ in the Leader.[1] It appears that he was one of the two men from Coonamble reported in the Gilgandra Weekly as catching up with the Coo-ees at Molong on 22nd October 1915 – the other being ‘Coonambleite’ Jack Parker, who also did his medical at Dubbo on 21st October 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On the 23rd March 1916 he was transferred to the 16th Reinforcements for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Coonamble, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his aunt, Salina [sic] Ann Bradbury, Richmond, Rocky Point Road, Sans Souci, N.S.W.

On 18th April 1916 Trooper Nicholls departed Sydney on the HMAT A56 Palermo, arriving in Egypt on 18th May 1916.

On 21st May 1916 Trooper Nicholls was admitted to the Government Hospital at Suez with Mumps. On 17th June 1916 he was discharged from hospital and rejoined the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-El-Kebir, Egypt.

On 5th August 1916 Trooper Nicholls departed the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment to join the 7th Light Horse Regiment. On 16th August 1916 Trooper Nicholls marched into the 7th Light Horse Regiment when it was resting at Bir Etmaler, Egypt.

On 14th February 1917 the Regiment was conducting training at Masaid, Egypt. Trooper Nicholls was detached to the Division Headquarters for duty. He returned to the Regiment on 1st March 1917 when it was resting at Sheik Zowaiid, Egypt.

On 8th March 1917 the Regiment was conducting usual camp duties at Bir Abu Shunnar, Egypt – on this day Trooper Nicholls was charged with loss of equipment viz sword and bayonet.

On 24th of April 1917 the Regiment was manning outposts and Patrolling in the Sinai after being involved in the Second Battle of Gaza. A Squadron of the 7th Regiment had an engagement with a party of Turkish Cavalry at Tel Al Tarar. 18 Turks were captured one of them wounded. Trooper Nicholls was evacuated to the 54th Casualty Clearing Station at Deir el Belah suffering Heat Exhaustion. On 25th April 1917 he moved by Hospital Train to the 26th Casualty Clearing Station at El Arish, arriving on 28th April 1917. On 30th April 1917 he was transferred to the 24th Stationary Hospital at Kantara, Egypt, suffering from Pyrexia (Fever), arriving on the 1st of May 1917. Later that day he was transferred to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Abbassia, Egypt.

On 16th May 1917 Trooper Nicholls was discharged from hospital and reported to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Moascar, Egypt.

On 30th May 1917 Trooper Nicholls was detached for duty at the Headquarters of the Australian New Zealand Mounted Division Training Centre. Trooper Nicholls remained on this detached duty until 7th November 1917 when he was sent back to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment.

On 18th November 1917 Trooper Nicholls left the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment for return to the 7th Light Horse Regiment. On the way, on 20th November 1917 he was admitted to the 2nd Light Horse Field Ambulance suffering from Gonorrhoea. That same day he was transferred to the 66th Casualty Clearing Station. On 21st November 1917 he was transferred to the 44th Stationary Hospital at Kantara, Egypt. On 22nd November 1917 he was sent to the 2nd Australian Stationary Hospital at Moascar, Egypt.

On 18th December 1917 Trooper Nicholls was discharged from hospital and returned to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment. On 31st December 1917 Trooper Nicholls was sent to the rest camp at Port Said, Egypt. On 20th January 1918 he left the rest camp and returned to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment.

On 21st March 1918 Trooper Nicholls was charged with When on Active Service Absenting himself Without Leave from 0900 20th March 1918 until he reported himself at 0830 21st March 1918. He was awarded 7 days confined to Camp and fined 2 days pay.

On 12th April 1918 Trooper Nicholls rejoined the 7th Light Horse Regiment when it was in action around Wadi Augua, Palestine.

On 7th May 1918 the 7th Light Horse Regiment was at Jericho, Palestine, when at 0500 eight enemy aeroplanes bombed the camp. The Regiment’s casualties were 3 killed and 10 wounded. Trooper Nicholls was one of those killed in action.

Trooper Nicholls is buried in the Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel. A photograph of his grave can be seen at (and purchased from) http://twgpp.org/information.php?id=1242338

Trooper Nicholls’ name is commemorated on panel 5 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

W. H. Nicholls' name on the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour (Photograph: S. &. H. Thompson 5/1/2015)

W. H. Nicholls’ name on the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour (Photograph: S. &. H. Thompson 5/1/2015)

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission Register lists that he was the son of the late Arthur and Louisa Nicholls.[3]

[1] ‘Personal’, Leader, 22 May 1918, p. 1, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article100963899

[2] ‘With the “Coo-ees.” From town to town’, Gilgandra Weekly , 20 October 1915, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119923919 ; ‘Our soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 2 November 1915, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601759

[3] Nicholls, Tpr. William Henry, 2369, Commonwealth War Graves Commission Register, Jerusalem War Cemetery, http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/647728/NICHOLLS,%20WILLIAM%20HENRY

 

John MARTIN

John MARTIN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4541), John Martin was born at Melbourne, Victoria. He gave his age as 34 years 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 2 lbs., with a florid complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 22nd October 1915 at Molong, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Molong (8 miles from Molong East) on the 22nd October 1915.

After joining the Coo-ees at Molong, he completed the Coo-ee March, and went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The address he gave on his initial application to enlist form at Molong on the 22nd October 1915 was Bowral, Southern Line, N.S.W. On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was C/o E. J. Arnold, St. John’s Road, Forest Lodge, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as sister, Mrs. M. Martin, St. John’s Road, Forest Lodge, Sydney, N.S.W.

On 16th February, 1916 Private Martin departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70. On the voyage to Egypt the HMAT Ballarat A70 stopped at Ceylon where on 3rd of March 1916 Private Martin was charged with Being Absent Without Leave from 1700 on 7th March 1916 till 1900 on 7th March 1916, and also charged with Breaking Ranks. He was fined 1 pound.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 Private Martin was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post, Egypt.

On 19th June 1916 Private Martin left Alexandria aboard the Transport HT Caledonian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 29th June 1916.

Private Martin joined the 54th Battalion early in July 1916 when it was conducting training at Thiennes, France. On 7th July 1916 Private Martin was evacuated to the 12th Casualty Clearing Station suffering from Haemorrhoids. On 10th July he was placed aboard the 18th Ambulance Train bound for Calais, France. On 13th July 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Newhaven that departed for England and arrived at Dover later that day. Private Martin was then admitted to the General Military Hospital at Colchester, England.

As a result of being hospitalised with his ailment Private Martin was not present with the 54th Battalion when it was involved in the Battle of Fromelles later that month.

On 20th September 1916 Private Martin marched into the 14th Training Battalion at Larkhill, England. On 14th October 1916 Private Martin departed England bound for France, marching into the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples on 16th October 1916. On 30th October 1916 Private Martin departed the 5th Australian Division Base Depot to rejoin his unit.

On 2nd November 1916 Private Martin arrived at the 54th Battalion when it was in the trenches in the vicinity of Longueval, France.

On 14th December 1916 when the Battalion was resting at Montauban, France, after just coming out of the trenches, Private Martin was evacuated to a Field Ambulance suffering from Trench Feet. On 16th December 1916 he was admitted to the 11th Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France. On 17th December 1916 he was sent to Calais, France. On 17th December 1916 Private Martin boarded the Hospital Ship Carisbrooke Castle bound for England. On 18th December 1916 he was admitted to the 1st London General Hospital.

On 15th January 1917 Private Martin was discharged from Hospital and granted leave till 30th January 1917, when he marched into the 1st Convalescent Depot at Pernham Downs, England.

On 28th February 1917 Private Martin departed Folkestone, England, bound for France aboard the Transport Invicta. He arrived at the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, on 1st March 1917.

On 21st March 1917 he left the 5th Australian Division Base Depot to rejoin his unit. On 23rd March 1917 Private Martin arrived at the 54th Battalion when it was engaged in consolidating work and resting in the vicinity of Longueval, France.

On 27th May 1917 the Battalion was resting at Beaulencourt, France where Private Martin was promoted to Corporal.

On 19th of July 1917 Corporal Martin was transferred to the 14th Training Battalion in England. He arrived in England on 24th of July 1917.

On the 5th October 1917 he attended the 37th Army course of P. & B. instruction at Tidworth and qualified as “fair”.

On 12th January 1918 in a letter to 14th Training Battalion he changed his next of kin from his sister to his new English wife Mrs Louisa Minnie Martin, whose address was 64 Bessborough Place, Bessborough Street, Vauxhall Bridge Road, London, S.W.  On 16th January 1918 he made a new will bequeathing his real and personal estate to his wife.

On 1st April 1918 Corporal Martin departed Dover for France arriving at the Number 1 Overflow camp at Beaumarais, France. On 4th April 1918 Corporal Martin left Beaumarais to rejoin the 54th Battalion. On 10th April 1918 he arrived at the Battalion when it was preparing to go into action in the vicinity of Aubigny, France.

On 24th April 1918 the 54th Battalion was engaged in action in the vicinity of Villers Bretonneux, France, when Corporal Martin received a gunshot wound to his chest. He was evacuated to the 15th Australian Field Ambulance, then on 25th April 1918 to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station, then onto the 10th General Hospital at Rouen, France.

On 3rd May 1918 he was sent to Hospital in England, arriving at the 5th Southern General Hospital at Portsmouth, England, on the 4th May 1918. On 15th May 1918 he was transferred to the 5rd Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England. He was discharged from hospital on 17th May 1918 and went on leave, reporting back to the 4th Convalescent Depot at Hurdcott, England, on 31st May 1918.

On 19th July 1918 Corporal Martin marched into the overseas Training Brigade and on 15th August 1918 he departed Folkestone for France. On 16th August 1918 Corporal Martin arrived at the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 22nd August 1918 Corporal Martin rejoined the 54th Battalion whilst it was in reserve in the vicinity of Proyart, France.

On 1st September 1918 Corporal Martin was with the 54th Battalion when it was involved in the successful assault on Peronne, France. During this assault the 54th Battalion lost 27 men killed, 147 wounded and had 9 men missing. Corporal Martin was one of those killed in action.

Corporal Martin is buried in the Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension, Peronne, France.

John Martin's headstone at Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson, 6/9/2014)

John Martin’s headstone at Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson, 6/9/2014)

Corporal Martin’s name is commemorated on panel 159 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

John Martin’s name is also recorded on the Coo-ee March Memorial Gateway at Molong as one of the five men who joined the Coo-ee March at Molong on 22nd October 1915.

Patrick Joseph O’LOUGHLIN (O’LOUGHLEN)

Patrick Joseph O’LOUGHLIN (O’LOUGHLEN)

Per his initial military service record (Depot), Patrick O’Loughlin was born at Ballyvaugan, County Clare, Ireland. He gave his age as 27 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 6 feet tall, weight 13 stone, with a medium complexion, light brown eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He completed his medical at Molong on 22nd October 1915, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Molong (8 miles east) on the 22nd October 1915. He claimed to have no previous military experience.

The postal address he gave on his initial Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form at Molong on 22nd October 1915 was Tattersalls Hotel, Gilgandra N.S.W.

It was reported in The Western Champion (21/10/1915, p. 19) that the Parkes Recruiting Association had held a recruiting meeting ‘for the purpose of enrolling recruits who were willing to join the volunteers now on the way, by road, from Gilgandra to Sydney’, and that ‘five men had mounted the lorry in response to the appeal’, and that ‘one of them went on to Dubbo’, with the remaining four planning to proceed to Molong to join the contingent. Patrick O’Loughlin was one of the four recruits sent by the Parkes Recruiting Association to join the Coo-ees at Molong.

The Gilgandra Weekly newspaper reported on 3 December 1915 (p. 10) that O’Loughlin had enlisted at Parkes, and joined the Coo-ee March at Molong, and had said that “a mate of mine told me that the Mayor of Parkes was offering £5 to every man who would join the Coo-ees’ march. I went in search of the Mayor and found him at the Parkes railway station. I asked him if what I had been told was true, and he said Yes, I am giving five pounds to every man who joins the Coo-ees from Parkes, and passes the medical man with the route march. He then paid my train fare to Molong, and I caught the train and joined the Coo-ees at Molong.”

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. However on the 17th November 1915 Private O’Loughlin went before a Medical Board where they recommended his discharge due to Varicose Veins. On the 29th November 1915 Private O’Loughlin was discharged as medically unfit.

In the official correspondence of the march held in the Mitchell Library collection, there is a receipt for £5 made out to P. O’Loughlin dated 16th November 1915 with note ‘Parkes townspeoples honorarium’, and an undated letter from O’Loughlin addressed to Mr A. H.Miller, Secretary of the Gilgandra Recruitment Association, about his non-payment after he was discharged, which had his address at the time listed as being Millthorpe Grand Western Hotel.

A year after his initial enlistment in the Coo-ee March, he re-enlisted at Dubbo Military Camp under the name of Patrick Joseph O’Loughlin, with regimental no. 7048, on the 27th October 1916. He completed (and passed) his medical, and was attested, that same day. He gave his age as 28 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical this time was a height of 6 feet 0 ¾ inches, weight 172 lbs, with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and black hair.

On the 3rd November 1916 Private O’Loughlin was transferred from Dubbo Depot Batalion to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 3rd Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was P.O., Dubbo, N.S.W, and his next of kin is listed as mother, Mrs M. O’Brien, Corkscrew Hill, Bally Vaughan, Clare, Ireland.

On the 9th November 1916 Private O’Loughlin departed Sydney on the HMAT A24 Benalla, arriving at Devonport, England, on the 9th January 1917, marching into the 1st Training Battalion at Durrington.

On the 16th May 1917 Private O’Loughlin was charged with being Absent Without Leave from reville on the 30th April, till apprehended by the Military Police at Waterford at 8.30 pm on the 7th May 1917. He was also charged with attempting to escape from escort by jumping from a train whilst in motion. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment number two and forfeiture of 30 days pay and spent eight days in custody awaiting trial.

On the 14th June 1917 Private O’Loughlin marched out of the 1st Training Battalion and departed for France from Southampton. On the 15th June 1917 Private O’Loughlin marched into the 1st Division Base Depot at Le Havre. On the 28th June 1917 he departed the 1st Division Base Depot and marched into the 3rd Battalion on the 3rd July 1917 whilst it was conducting training in the vicinity of Mesnil, France.

On the 18th September 1917 the 3rd Battalion was at Dickebusch, near Ypres, in Belgium, when Private O’Loughlin was killed in action, only three months after arriving at the Western Front.

Private O’Loughlin has no known grave, and is remembered on the Menin Gate Memorial at Ieper (Ypres), Belgium, under the name O’LOUGHLEN P. J.

 

O’Loughen J P on 3rd Battalion Australian Infantry panel [third row in centre on right] at the Menin Gate Memorial, Ieper, Belgium (Photograph: H. Thompson 11/9/2012)

O’Loughlen P. J. on 3rd Battalion Australian Infantry panel [name in centre of the row on the right] at the Menin Gate Memorial, Ieper, Belgium (Photograph: H. Thompson 11/9/2012)

His name is recorded as Patrick Joseph O’LOUGHLEN on the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour database.

Patrick O’Loughlin’s name is also recorded on the Coo-ee March Memorial Gateway at Molong as one of the five men from Molong who joined the Coo-ee March on 22nd October 1915.