Monthly Archives: July 2015

Photo of the Coo-ees at Orange

PHOTO OF THE COO-EES AT ORANGE

The Coo-ees at Wade Park, Orange, October 1915. Photograph courtesy of Macquarie Regional Library

The Coo-ees at Wade Park, Orange, October 1915. Photograph courtesy of Macquarie Regional Library

This is a photograph of the Coo-ees who were in the Gilgandra to Sydney Cooee-Recruitment March, taken while they were in Orange in October 1915.  Inscribed on the back of the photograph is “The Coo-ees at Orange”.

Except for Captain Bill Hitchen from Gilgandra (sitting in the middle of the second row from the bottom), the people in it are not identified.

This original photograph is part of the Local Studies Collection at Macquarie Regional Library.  A high resolution digital copy can be purchased from Macquarie Regional Library for the purpose of private research and study, and the quality of the image allows you to zoom in on each face and see each individual Coo-ee quite clearly.  Further information about the photograph can be found on the Macquarie Regional Library website at http://catalogue.mrl.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/OPAC/BIBENQ?BRN=170437

Included in this photograph are the men who enlisted as they marched from Gilgandra to Dubbo, Wongarbon, Geurie, Wellington, Stuart Town, Euchareena, Molong, to Orange, where the photograph was taken. (Some may be missing, including the 5 in Orange Hospital sick at the time).

There are approximately 104 men, and 23 women seated on a grandstand, which was situated at Wade Park in Orange. Most of the women are seated at the back.

Names of the dignitaries and local Orange people included in the photograph were reported in a 1915 newspaper article, and these people too need to be identified in this photograph. Per The Leader (17 November 1915, p. 8): ‘Seated in the group are the Mayor and Mayoress (Ald. and Mrs E. T. Neilly) Mr H. J. Leary, secretary of the Orange Recruiting Association. Mr. A. J. McCoy, headmaster of the Orange Public School, Mr. V. H. Millard, and the ladies who gave their services towards looking after “Hitchen’s Own” what time they were in Orange.’

A project I am working on is to identify as many Coo-ees as possible in this photograph. Please send an email to cooeemarch1915@gmail.com if anyone can identify any of the people in this photograph.

Alan John Burnett EASTERBROOK

Alan John Burnett EASTERBROOK

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4772), Alan John Burnett Easterbrook was born at Penrith N.S.W. He gave his age as 23 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as baker. His description on his medical was height5 feet 11 inches tall, weight 172 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and light brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service. His joined on date on his Attestation paper in his service record is dated 9th November 1915, however he did not complete his medical examination, and his attestation, until 2nd December 1915, at Liverpool.

‘Allen [sic] Easterbrook’ (along with J. Megarrity and W. A. Sutton) was one of the three Penrith men reported as stepping forward to join the Coo-ees ‘amidst the cheers of the audience’, in response to Mr Blacket’s recruitment speech and call of “What do we want, Coo-ees?” and their response of “We want men – men, and plenty of them!”, during the open-air Concert held for the Coo-ees at Penrith on the evening of Tuesday, 9th November, 2015.[1]

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 15th December 1915 Private Easterbrook was charged with being Absent Without Leave and he was fined. On 16th February 1916 he was again charged with Being Absent Without Leave and Being Absent from Special Parade. He was fined again. On 21st February 1916 he was again charged for Being Absent Without Leave for two days. He received another fine.

On Allan [sic] John Burnett Easterbrook’s embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was High Street, Penrith, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs E. [Elizabeth] Easterbrook, High Street, Penrith, N.S.W. His date of joining is recorded as 9th November 1915.

On 8th March 1916 Private Easterbrook departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 7th June 1916 Private Easterbrook left Alexandria aboard the Transport Ionian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

On 26th July 1916 Private Easterbrook was at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot when he was charged with Falling out of the line of march without a permit and Remaining absent from Training Parade, and he was fined one day’s pay.

On 19th of August 1916 Private Easterbrook joined the 13th Battalion when it was in action around Pozieres, France. Private Easterbrook served through the fighting around Pozieres until 30th August 1916 when he was reported wounded in action. He was admitted to hospital sick on 1st September 1916 in France.

Private Easterbrook’s experience at Pozieres was reported in an article published in the Nepean Times, 18th August 1917 (p. 2):

‘Private Easterbrook gave … a vivid impression of operations, in which he was engaged, culminating in the heroic advance on Pozieres, in which on 29th August, 1916, he sustained casualties – wounds from shrapnel … The attack on that sector of the enemy’s positions at Pozieres in which Private Easterbrook took part was timed for midnight, and in recounting the valiant rush to the German trenches, Private Easterbrook says, “it was about five past twelve when we hopped over the parapet. A good many of our chaps dropped on the way across … Later on that eventful wintry morning he succumbed to the shrapnel “visitation,” and some days afterwards was sent to Boulogne Hospital, France; and was subsequently transferred across the channel to the 1st Eastern General Hospital Cambridge, where he had the best of nursing and medical treatment. On becoming convalescent, Private Easterbrook spent several weeks in sight-seeing in London, and other parts of England, and is loud in his praises of the lavish hospitality meted out to Australian soldiers by the people of England ….’[2]

On 5th September 1916 Private Easterbrook was placed aboard the Hospital Ship St David at Boulogne, France, bound for England. Upon arrival he was admitted to the 1st Eastern General Hospital in Cambridge, England, suffering from Rheumatism. On 10th October he was transferred to the 3rd Auxiliary Hospital at Southall, England with Gun Shot Wound back. He was granted furlough in London from 16th to 31st October 1916.

He marched into No. 1 Convalescent Depot at Perham Downs on 3rd November 1916.

On 8th November 1916 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England, sick, and  suffering from Rheumatism. He was discharged on the 8th of March 1917 and marched into the 2nd Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On the 23rd May 1917 Private Easterbrook embarked from Devonport on the A33 Ayrshire bound for Australia with Rheumatism. He arrived in Sydney on the 19th of July 1917, and was discharged medically unfit on the 21st of August 1917.

His name is listed on the 1914-1919 Penrith Roll of Honour at Penrith City Memory Park.

[1] ‘Coo-ees at Penrith’, Nepean Times, 13 November 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86168730

[2] ‘Returned Soldier’, Nepean Times, 18 August 1917, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86146710

 

 

Leo Ambrose STINSON

Leo Ambrose STINSON

Per his military service record (Depot), Leo Ambrose Stinson was born at Boomey, near the town of Wellington, N.S.W. He gave his age as 18 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as storeman. His description on his medical was height 6 feet and ½ inch tall, weight 9 stone 7 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 22nd October 1915 at Gilgandra (12 days after the Coo-ees left), then caught up with the Coo-ees, and was attested at Blayney by Captain Eade on the 26th October 1915 (when the Coo-ees were at Blayney).

Leo Stinson was the recruit who joined the Coo-ees at Blayney from Gilgandra by train that was reported in the The Farmer and Settler, 29 October, 1915, p. 3.[1]

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp into D Coy 5th Battalion.

Following a further medical examination before the Medical Board on 17th November 1915 after arriving at Liverpool Camp with the Coo-ees, Private Stinson was discharged on the 29th of November 1915 as medically unfit, with deficient chest measurement.

On 18th March 1916 Leo Stinson re-enlisted at Dubbo, where he passed his medical and was attested. After some training he embarked from Sydney on 9th September 1916 as 15th reinforcement for the 20th Battalion on the HMAT A14 Euripides. He was given regimental no. 5644.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Miller Street, Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed his father, John Nicholas Stinson, Rydal, N.S.W.

He arrived at Plymouth in England on 26th October 1916.

Private Stinson trained in England until 13th December 1916, when he was sent to Etaples in France. He joined the Battalion in France on 26th January 1917.

On the 15/16th of April 1917 a German attack broke through the front line near Lagnicourt in France and the guns of the 2nd Australian Field Artillery Brigade were captured. The 20th Battalion was involved in the counterattack that recaptured the guns and forced the Germans back to their lines. Over 200 Germans were captured by the Battalion in this operation. Six members of the Battalion were killed, and were 16 wounded, including Private Stinson, who received a gunshot wound to his back and another to his right arm. Private Stinson was evacuated to the 9th Casualty Clearing Station, then admitted to the 10th General Hospital in Rouen on 17th April 1917. He was then sent to England on 29th April 1917, and was admitted to the 5th Southern General Hospital on 30th April 1917.

On 7th July 1917 Private Simpson was discharged from the 5th Southern General Hospital to No. 1 Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield.

On 26th September 1917 Private Stinson left England on the HMAT Borda bound for Australia. He arrived in Melbourne on 25th November 1917, and was discharged as medically unfit on 4th January 1918.

On 22nd July 1919 Private Stinson re-enlisted in the Special Service AIF (regimental no. 86082), and on 12th August 1919 he departed Sydney bound for Europe as an escort for deportees being sent to Europe. He arrived at London on 12th October 1919. On 5th December 1919 Private Stinson commenced his return to Australia, arriving on 23rd January 1920. He was discharged on 7th February 1920.

Leo Stinson also enlisted in the AIF in the Second World War.

[1] ‘Great Route March. Gilgandra to the Coast’, ’, The Farmer and Settler, 29 October 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/n la.news-article116671286

 

 

Ernest Stephen TAYLOUR

Ernest Stephen TAYLOUR

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4905), Ernest Stephen Taylour was born at London, England. He gave his age as 37 years and 8 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 3 inches tall, weight 134 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to have no previous military service.

He completed his medical on the 11th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested at Parramatta on the 11th November 1915. The Coo-ees had held a recruiting meeting in the Park at Parramatta on the evening of the 10th November, where it was reported that 41 men had offered themselves as recruits.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. His service record shows he was made Acting Sergeant on 11th November 1915.

He was reported in The Farmer and Settler on 5th January 1916 as being one of the Platoon Sergeants in E company from the “Coo-ees” column, and it was noted that ‘as the “Coo-ees” are reinforcements for a battalion already at the front, and not part of a new battalion, these ranks may be only temporary’.[2]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Farndon, Prospect Road, Wentworthville, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed his wife, Mrs M. [Miriam] Taylour, Farndon, Prospect Road, Wentworthville, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Acting Sergeant Taylour departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Taylour left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

On 7th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was in the front lines in the vicinity of Pozieres, France, when Private Taylour was evacuated from the field suffering shell shock. He was moved back to the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station, then on 8th August 1916 he was moved to the 13th General Hospital at Boulogne, France. On 9th August 1916 he was placed aboard the hospital ship Jan Breydel for evacuation to England.

On 10th August 1916 he was admitted to the St Lukes War Hospital at Halifax, England.

On 9th October 1916 Private Taylour was discharged from hospital and marched into the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 2nd November 1916 he was transferred to the Number 4 Command Depot at Wareham, England.

On 12th April 1917 Private Taylour marched out to Number 2 Base Depot at Weymouth.

On 4th May 1917 Private Taylour departed Devonport, England, aboard H.M.A.T. Runic bound for Australia. He arrived in Australia on 6th July 1917, and was discharged Medically Unfit on 14th August 1917.

[1] ‘The procession’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 13 November 1915, p. 11, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86101767

[2] ‘Route Marches. Gathering of the Clans. The “Cooees”winning praise in camp’, The Farmer and Settler, 5 January 1916, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116676486

 

Maurice Bertram FREE

Maurice Bertram FREE

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4776), Maurice Bertram Free was born at Forbes, N.S.W. He gave his age as 32 years and 11 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as poultry farmer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 ½ inches tall, weight 110 lbs., with a dark complexion, bluish eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to have 18 months military service in the G. R. Regiment.

He completed his medical on the 10th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested at Parramatta on the 11th November 1915. The Coo-ees had held a recruiting meeting in the Park at Parramatta on the evening of the 10th November, where it was reported that 41 men had offered themselves as recruits.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. His service record shows he was made Acting Corporal on 11th November 1915.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Baulkham Hills, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed his wife, Mrs G.[Grace] Free, Cr. Chetwynd Grove and Mary Street, Merrylands, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Acting Sergeant Free departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on the HMAT A15 Star of England on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Free left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Free served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France, in July 1916, then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September, and October 1916.

On 7th October 1916 the 45th Battalion was training at La Clytte, Belgium, where Private Free was promoted to Lance Corporal.

On 15th October 1916 the 45th Battalion conducted a raid upon the German trenches opposite. The raiding party suffered 4 men wounded. Also during the retaliatory artillery barrage 2 men were killed and 8 wounded. It is not clear if Lance Corporal Free was amongst the raiding party but he was wounded in the field, receiving a slight shrapnel wound to his chest. He was evacuated to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance. He rejoined the Battalion on 17th October 1916.

On the 15th of February 1917 the 45th Battalion was training at Mametz Camp, France when Lance Corporal Free was promoted to Temporary Corporal. His rank became permanent on 6th April 1917.

On 27th April 1917 he was promoted to Temporary Sergeant, and detached to 4th Division Infantry School for duty. On 4th June 1917 he was promoted to Sergeant.

On 9th June 1917 the 45th Battalion was in action around Messines, Belgium when Sergeant Free was wounded in action suffering a gunshot wound to his right hand. He was evacuated to the 9th Australian Field Ambulance, then on to 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing Station, then the 19th Ambulance Train, for journey to the 2nd Camp Hospital at Rouen, France. He was discharged on the 2nd of July 1917 and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France, arriving on 5th July 1917.

Sergeant Free departed the 4th Australian Division Base Depot on 12th November 1917 and arrived back at the 45th Battalion on 27th November 1917, whilst it was training at St Quentin, France.

On 15th April 1918 Sergeant Free was made a Company Quarter Master Sergeant.

On 29th June 1918 CQMS Free went to England on leave. He returned from leave on 17th July 1918.

On 24th September 1918 CQMS Free was detached for duty with the 27th American Division. He rejoined the 45th Battalion on 2nd October 1918.

On 11th December 1918 CQMS Free marched into the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve, France, for a Medical Board. CQMS Free went before the Medical Board on 17th December 1918. He was classified as B2 and transferred to England, and arrived at Weymouth on 18th December 1918.

On 18th January 1919 CQMS Free departed England aboard the H.T. Ulysses bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 4th February 1919, and was discharged Medically Unfit on 19th July 1919.

[1] ‘The procession’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 13 November 1915, p. 11, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86101767

Allan COLQUHOUN

Allan COLQUHOUN

Allan Colquhoun (CumberlandArgus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 16/11/1918)

Allan Colquhoun (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 16/11/1918)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4749), Allan Colquhoun was born at Glebe, Sydney, N.S.W. He gave his age as 18 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as saddler. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 ¾ inches tall, weight 104 ½ lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and light brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had 4 years military service in the cadets.

He completed his medical on the 10th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested at Parramatta on the 11th November 1915. The Coo-ees had held a recruiting meeting in the Park at Parramatta on the evening of the 10th November, where it was reported that 41 men had offered themselves as recruits.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Redmont [sic, i.e. Belmont] Street, Merrylands, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his aunt, M. Colquhoun, Redmont Street, Merrylands, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Colquhoun departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 11th May he was admitted to hospital at Tel El Kebir, Egypt, suffering from Influenza. He was discharged on 5th June 1916.

On 6th August 1916 Private Colquhoun left Alexandria aboard the Transport Megantic bound for England.

On 23rd September 1916 Private Colquhoun departed England bound for France. He arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples on 24th September 1916.

On 21st of October 1916 Private Colquhoun marched into the 13th Battalion when it was in billets at Steenvoorde, Belgium.

On 1st January 1917 the 13th Battalion was at a Brigade Sports day at Rainneville, France when Private Colquhoun was admitted to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance suffering a dog bite. He rejoined the 13th Battalion on 7th January 1917 when it was leaving its billets at Ribemont, France.

On 23rd February 1917 the 13th Battalion was training at Ribemont, France, when Private Colquhoun was admitted to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance suffering a hernia. He was transferred to the 4th Division Rest Station on 27th February 2017. He rejoined the 13th Battalion on 6th March 1917 at Ribemont, France.

On 11th April 1917 the 13th Battalion was involved in an attack on the Hindenburg Line in the vicinity of the village of Reincourt, France. During this attack the Battalion suffered 25 killed, 118 wounded, and 367 missing. Private Colquhoun was one of those reported missing in action.

On 23rd June 1917 the German authorities reported that Private Colquhoun was a Prisoner of War and was being held at Limburg, Germany.

An article in The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate on 16th November 1918 reported:

‘Private Allan Conquhoun, who has been a prisoner of war in Gefangenenager [sic] Schneidemuhl, Germany, for over eighteen months, is a nephew of Mr and Mrs A. Colquhoun, of Belmont Street, Merrylands. This young soldier, who is only 21 years of age, joined the “Coo-ees” in Parramatta and sailed for the front on 8th March, 1916, being attached to the 15th Reinforcements of 13th Battalion. In a letter to Miss L. Allmark, of Granville, he says:–“I am the only Australian in this camp, and I spend my time learning the German language. I get good treatment here, but only for the Red Cross parcels I don’t know what I’d do in the way of food. I am in the best of health and you need not worry about me having a bad time, as I am getting on tip top, and hope to be home very soon.”[2]

On 1st December 1918 Private Colquhoun was repatriated to England. He was admitted to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England. On 13th December 1918 he was granted leave to report back to the hospital on 4th January 1919.

On 5th March 1919 Private Colquhoun departed England aboard the transport Nevesa bound for Australia. He arrived in Sydney on 26th April 1919, and was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 10th June 1919.

[1] ‘The procession’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 13 November 1915, p. 11, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86101767

[2] ‘Our Brave Boys on the Battle Fields’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 16 November 1918, p. 10, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86210502

 

William FARTHING

William FARTHING

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4773), William Farthing was born at Moss Vale, N.S.W. He gave his age as 29 years and 10 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 11 inches tall, weight 155 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and sandy hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical on the 10th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested at Parramatta on the 11th November 1915. The Coo-ees had held a recruiting meeting in the Park at Parramatta on the evening of the 10th November, where it was reported that 41 men had offered themselves as recruits.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 21st January 1916 Private Farthing was charged with being absent from parade at the Liverpool Camp, and he was fined 5 shillings. On 3rd February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave for 1 day, and he was fined 5 shillings. On 21st February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave for 2 days, and he was fined 20 shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Eglington Street, Lidcombe, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs A. M. [Ada May] Farthing, Eglington Street, Lidcombe, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Farthing departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. On 27th March 1916 he was charged with breaking ship, and was fined 5 pounds.

He arrived in Egypt on the HMAT A15 Star of England on 11th April 1916.

On 18th April he was admitted to the 2nd Australian Stationary Hospital at Tel El Kebir, Egypt, suffering from mumps. He was discharged on 26th April 1916. On 30th April 1916 Private Farthing was again admitted to the 2nd Australian Stationary Hospital suffering mumps. He was discharged on 31st May 1916, and proceeded to England [date and ship unknown].

On 21st June 1916 Private Farthing was admitted to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England sick (on the same day that Bill Hitchen was also admitted to the same hospital).

He was discharged on 9th November 1916 and sent to the Number 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England, arriving on 11th November 1916.

On 5th December 1916 Private Farthing was charged with being absent from 0900 on 2nd December until 1930 on 3rd December 1916. He was awarded 48 hours detention and fined 4 days pay.

On 16th January 1917 Private Farthing departed England on the ship Princess Victoria bound for France. He arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples on 17th January 1917.

On 21st January 1917 Private Farthing marched into the 13th Battalion when it was performing fatigue duties at Mametz, France.

On 15th August 1917 Private Farthing was detached to the 4th Australian Division Traffic Police. On 30th October 1917 he was charged with Neglecting to Obey a Lawful Order given by a Superior Officer. He was awarded forfeiture of 21 days pay. He was also sent back to the 13th Battalion.

On 8th September 1918 Private Farthing went on leave to England. He rejoined the 13th Battalion on 24th September 1918 when it was at Picquigny, France.

On 31st December 1918 Private Farthing went to Paris on leave. He returned on 7th January 1919 and was admitted to the Canadian General Hospital suffering Inguinal Adenitis. On 5th February 1919 he was transferred to the 3rd Stationary Hospital. On 17th February 1919 he was sent to England on board a hospital ship and admitted to the King George Hospital in London suffering from boils.

On 25th February 1919 Private Farthing was discharged from hospital and went on leave to report to the Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 11th March 1919.

On 13th March 1919 Private Farthing marched into the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 5th April 1919 Private Farthing departed England aboard the transport Armagh bound for Australia. He arrived in Sydney on 20th May 1919 and was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 4th July 1919.

[1] ‘The procession’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 13 November 1915, p. 11, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86101767

William Joseph MUNRO

William Joseph MUNRO

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4853), William Joseph Munro was born at Parramatta, N.S.W. He gave his age as 23 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as station hand / laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 6 ½ inches tall, weight 135 lbs., with a dark complexion, light hazel eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical on the 10th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested at Parramatta on the 11th November 1915. The Coo-ees had held a recruiting meeting in the Park at Parramatta on the evening of the 10th November, where it was reported that 41 men had offered themselves as recruits.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Ox Hide, Cook Street, Lidcombe, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, J. Munro, Ox Hide, Cook Street, Lidcombe, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Munro departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 7th June 1916 Private Munro left Alexandria aboard the Transport Ionian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

He was sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France. On 21st July 1916 he joined the 13th Battalion whilst it was training at the Somme, France. He participated in the 13th Battalion’s first major offensive action in France at Pozieres in August 1916.

On 30th August 1916 Private Munro was with the 13th Battalion when it was in action at Pozieres, France. On this day Private Munro was reported Missing In Action.

On 27th September 1916 Private Munro was reported to be a Prisoner of War being held at Gefangenenlager at Dulmen in Westfalia, Germany. On the 16th of December 1916 he was reported to have been moved to Munster 1/W, Germany.

A photo of him appeared in the Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate on 8th June 1918 with another prisoner of war and a German prison guard, reporting that he was working in the salt mines.[2]

 

W. J. Munro (seated) with another prisoner of war and a German guard, 1918 (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 8/6/1918)

W. J. Munro (seated) with another prisoner of war and a German guard, 1918 (Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 8/6/1918)

Private Munro remained a prisoner for the remainder of the war. In December 1918 he was repatriated to England, arriving at Hull on 7th December 1918, and in London on 9th December 1918.

On 28th January 1919 Private Munro was charged with Being Absent Without Leave from 10 am on 11th January 1919 until 9 am on 28th January 1919. He was fined a total of 34 days pay. On 29th January 1919 Private Munro marched into the Number One Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

On 2nd March 1919 Private Munro departed England aboard the Derbyshire bound for Australia. He arrived in Australia on 24th April 1919, and was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 9th June 1919.

[1] ‘The procession’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 13 November 1915, p. 11, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86101767

[2] ‘Australians and German Guard’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 8 June 1918, p. 10, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86207336

 

 

William Henry NICHOLLS

William Henry NICHOLLS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2369), William Henry Nicholls was born at Camperdown, Sydney, N.S.W. He gave his age as 27 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as contractor. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 143 lbs., with a fair complexion, green eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had 12 months experience in the school cadets.

He completed his medical on the 2nd October 1915 at Coonamble, and was attested at Coonamble on the 21s October 1915. However another Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form in his service record was made at Dubbo on 21st October 1915 (after the Coo-ee March had passed through this town), and his medical examination form dated 2nd October 1915 at Coonamble is countersigned by Dr. E.H. Burkett at Dubbo and dated 21st October 1915.

William Henry Nicholls was reported to have been ‘one of the Coo-ees’ in the Leader.[1] It appears that he was one of the two men from Coonamble reported in the Gilgandra Weekly as catching up with the Coo-ees at Molong on 22nd October 1915 – the other being ‘Coonambleite’ Jack Parker, who also did his medical at Dubbo on 21st October 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On the 23rd March 1916 he was transferred to the 16th Reinforcements for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Coonamble, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his aunt, Salina [sic] Ann Bradbury, Richmond, Rocky Point Road, Sans Souci, N.S.W.

On 18th April 1916 Trooper Nicholls departed Sydney on the HMAT A56 Palermo, arriving in Egypt on 18th May 1916.

On 21st May 1916 Trooper Nicholls was admitted to the Government Hospital at Suez with Mumps. On 17th June 1916 he was discharged from hospital and rejoined the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-El-Kebir, Egypt.

On 5th August 1916 Trooper Nicholls departed the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment to join the 7th Light Horse Regiment. On 16th August 1916 Trooper Nicholls marched into the 7th Light Horse Regiment when it was resting at Bir Etmaler, Egypt.

On 14th February 1917 the Regiment was conducting training at Masaid, Egypt. Trooper Nicholls was detached to the Division Headquarters for duty. He returned to the Regiment on 1st March 1917 when it was resting at Sheik Zowaiid, Egypt.

On 8th March 1917 the Regiment was conducting usual camp duties at Bir Abu Shunnar, Egypt – on this day Trooper Nicholls was charged with loss of equipment viz sword and bayonet.

On 24th of April 1917 the Regiment was manning outposts and Patrolling in the Sinai after being involved in the Second Battle of Gaza. A Squadron of the 7th Regiment had an engagement with a party of Turkish Cavalry at Tel Al Tarar. 18 Turks were captured one of them wounded. Trooper Nicholls was evacuated to the 54th Casualty Clearing Station at Deir el Belah suffering Heat Exhaustion. On 25th April 1917 he moved by Hospital Train to the 26th Casualty Clearing Station at El Arish, arriving on 28th April 1917. On 30th April 1917 he was transferred to the 24th Stationary Hospital at Kantara, Egypt, suffering from Pyrexia (Fever), arriving on the 1st of May 1917. Later that day he was transferred to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Abbassia, Egypt.

On 16th May 1917 Trooper Nicholls was discharged from hospital and reported to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Moascar, Egypt.

On 30th May 1917 Trooper Nicholls was detached for duty at the Headquarters of the Australian New Zealand Mounted Division Training Centre. Trooper Nicholls remained on this detached duty until 7th November 1917 when he was sent back to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment.

On 18th November 1917 Trooper Nicholls left the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment for return to the 7th Light Horse Regiment. On the way, on 20th November 1917 he was admitted to the 2nd Light Horse Field Ambulance suffering from Gonorrhoea. That same day he was transferred to the 66th Casualty Clearing Station. On 21st November 1917 he was transferred to the 44th Stationary Hospital at Kantara, Egypt. On 22nd November 1917 he was sent to the 2nd Australian Stationary Hospital at Moascar, Egypt.

On 18th December 1917 Trooper Nicholls was discharged from hospital and returned to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment. On 31st December 1917 Trooper Nicholls was sent to the rest camp at Port Said, Egypt. On 20th January 1918 he left the rest camp and returned to the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment.

On 21st March 1918 Trooper Nicholls was charged with When on Active Service Absenting himself Without Leave from 0900 20th March 1918 until he reported himself at 0830 21st March 1918. He was awarded 7 days confined to Camp and fined 2 days pay.

On 12th April 1918 Trooper Nicholls rejoined the 7th Light Horse Regiment when it was in action around Wadi Augua, Palestine.

On 7th May 1918 the 7th Light Horse Regiment was at Jericho, Palestine, when at 0500 eight enemy aeroplanes bombed the camp. The Regiment’s casualties were 3 killed and 10 wounded. Trooper Nicholls was one of those killed in action.

Trooper Nicholls is buried in the Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel. A photograph of his grave can be seen at (and purchased from) http://twgpp.org/information.php?id=1242338

Trooper Nicholls’ name is commemorated on panel 5 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

W. H. Nicholls' name on the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour (Photograph: S. &. H. Thompson 5/1/2015)

W. H. Nicholls’ name on the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour (Photograph: S. &. H. Thompson 5/1/2015)

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission Register lists that he was the son of the late Arthur and Louisa Nicholls.[3]

[1] ‘Personal’, Leader, 22 May 1918, p. 1, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article100963899

[2] ‘With the “Coo-ees.” From town to town’, Gilgandra Weekly , 20 October 1915, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119923919 ; ‘Our soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 2 November 1915, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601759

[3] Nicholls, Tpr. William Henry, 2369, Commonwealth War Graves Commission Register, Jerusalem War Cemetery, http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/647728/NICHOLLS,%20WILLIAM%20HENRY

 

Thomas JACKSON

Thomas JACKSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4816), Thomas Jackson was born at Longford, Derby, Derbyshire, England. He gave his age as 32 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 146 lbs., with a fair complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

Thomas Jackson had come to Australia about 1911, when he was 28 years of age.[1] The Wellington Times recorded “Jackson” as one of the four recruits who stepped forward offering to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees recruited at Geurie on 15th October 1915.[2]

He completed his medical on the 16th October 1915 at Wellington, and was attested at Dripstone by Captain Nicholas on the 19th October 1915.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 2nd February 1916 Private Jackson was charged with being Absent Without Leave for one day. He was fined one days forfeiture of pay.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Longford, near Derby, England, and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs L. [Louisa] Jackson, Longford, near Derby, England.

On 8th March 1916 Private Jackson along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 3rd of May 1916 Private JACKSON was hospitalised at the 31st General Hospital at Port Said sick. He was discharged to duty on 2nd June 1916.

Private Jackson proceeded overseas to join his unit in France [date and ship unknown], via England, leaving the 4th Training Battalion at Rollestone on 30th July 1916. He marched into the 4th Division Base Depot at Etaples in France on 1st August 1916. On 19th August 1916 he was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion whilst it was resting at Pernois, after just coming out of the line at Pozieres.

On 25th September 1916 whilst the 13th Battalion was in action in the vicinity of Voormezeele, Belgium, Private Jackson was admitted to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Enteritis. He rejoined the Battalion on the 1st of October 1916.

On 11th April 1917 Private Jackson was with the 13th Battalion when it launched an unsuccessful attack on the Hindenburg Line in the vicinity of Bullecourt, France. During this attack Private Jackson was wounded in action, receiving shrapnel wounds to his face and neck. He was evacuated to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station. On 13th April he was admitted to the 11th Stationary Hospital at Rouen. On 14th April he was admitted to the 2nd Convalescent Depot at Rouen. On 21st April he was discharged and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples. On 30th April 1917 he rejoined the 13th Battalion whilst the Battalion was conducting training at Ribemont, France.

On 28th May 1917 Private Jackson was charged with being Absent Without Leave from Tattoo roll call on 24th May 1917 from 9.00 pm to 9.45 pm whilst the Battalion was in training. He was fined one days pay.

On 16th June 1917 Private Jackson was with the 13th Battalion when it was manning support trenches in the vicinity of Messines, Belgium. Private Jackson was one of two men killed from the 13th Battalion that day. Another five men were wounded.

Per his service record he was “buried N. of Hill 63 and about 250 yds N.E. of thatched cottage and about 100 yds West of above, close to Old Dugouts of support trench 1 ¾ mls S.S.W of Messines France”. However, Private Jackson’s grave could not be located after the war, and his name is remembered on the Menin Gate Memorial at Ieper (Ypres), Belgium.

T. Jackson's name on the Menin Gate Memorial (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 11/9/2012)

T. Jackson’s name on the Menin Gate Memorial (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 11/9/2012)

Private Jackson’s name is commemorated on panel 69 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

His name is also remembered on the St. Chad’s Church War Memorial, at Longford in Derbyshire, England.[3]

[1] Thomas Jackson, Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour Circular, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1643701/

[2] ‘Hitchen’s Coo-ees’, Wellington Times, 18 October 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143388423

[3] ‘Thomas Jackson’, Longford St. Chad’s Church War Memorial, Derbyshire, England, http://www.militaryimages.net/media/longford-church-war-memorial-derbyshire.57565/