Tag Archives: Lawson recruits

Tyson RYAN

Tyson RYAN

Per his military service record (regimental no. N21449), Tyson Ryan was born in Gilgandra, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 18 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as horse trainer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 9 stone 3 lbs., with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was recorded as being Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military experience.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as his father, Michael Ryan, Dubbo Road, Gilgandra.  Both his parents (Michael and Mary Ann Ryan) signed their names giving their consent for their son to enlist on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form.

He completed his medical examination at Gilgandra on 29th October 1915 (19 days after the start of the Coo-ee March).

He caught up with the Coo-ees, and was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Lawson on 7th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees rested at Lawson).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 6th Australian Light Horse Regiment.

Trooper Ryan forfeited 10 days pay for being absent without leave on 10th and  11th January 1916.

On 14th January 1916 Trooper Ryan was fined £10 for assaulting police during a riot.

He was fined 1 shilling, and confined to barracks for 7 days, for being absent without leave on 13th March 1916.

He was fined 1 shilling for neglect of duty and being late on 6 am parade on 6th May 1916.

On 15th May 1916 Trooper Ryan was fined £1 at Menangle Park for using threatening language to an N.C.O.

On the 19th of May 1916 Trooper Ryan was discharged unlikely to become an efficient soldier.

He attempted to re-enlist in 1917, however he was rejected as medically unfit.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, RYAN TYSON

Charles CREASE

Charles CREASE

Private Charles Crease (Sunday Times 8/10/1916)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4754), Charles Crease was born at Camperdown, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 38 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 146 lbs., with a ruddy complexion, brown eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed to have no previous military service.

He was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway when the Coo-ees were at Lawson on 7th November 1915.  He completed his medical examination at Lawson on 8th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Kiyare, Simmonds Street, Enmore, N.S.W.[2]  His next of kin was listed as his sister, Mrs J. Lathan, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Crease, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 Private Crease was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Crease left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He disembarked at Marseilles on 9th June 1916.

Private Crease served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then as it moved to Pozieres in early August 1916.

On 12th August 1916 the 45th Battalion was in reserve trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, when Private Crease was wounded in action, receiving a shrapnel wound to his left hand.[3]  He was evacuated to the 44th Casualty Clearing Station.  On 13th August 1916 he was sent to the 24th General Hospital at Etaples, France.

On 6th September 1916 Private Crease was discharged from hospital, and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot.

On 17th October 1916 Private Crease rejoined the 13th Battalion when it was conducting training and supplying fatigue parties at Murrumbidgee Camp at La Clyette, Belgium.[4]

On 9th May 1917 the 13th Battalion was conducting training at Bresle, France, when Private Crease was admitted to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station suffering Neuritis.  He rejoined the Battalion on 15th May 1917.

On 29th September 1917 the 13th Battalion was near Zonnebeke, Belgium, when Private Crease was wounded in action, receiving shrapnel wounds to his arm, legs and chest.[5] He was evacuated to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance, then on to the 10th Casualty Clearing Station.

On 5th October 1917 Private Crease was moved back to the 1st Canadian General Hospital at Etaples, France.

On 16th October 1917 Private Crease was evacuated to England on the Hospital Ship Newhaven, where he was admitted to the 1st Western General Hospital at Liverpool, England.

Private Crease was discharged from hospital on 12th December 1917, and granted leave till 26th December 1917, when he reported to the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 27th December 1917 Private Crease was admitted to the camp hospital sick [VD Venereal Disease]. He was discharged on 3rd January 1918.

On 14th February 1918 Private Crease was transferred to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

Private Crease left England on 12th March 1918 for return to Australia aboard the S.S. Kenilworth Castle. The ship arrived at Cape Town, South Africa on 28th March 1918. On 28th April 1918 Private Crease departed Cape Town aboard the H.T. Field Marshall.

He arrived in Australian on 22nd May 1918 (gunshot wound right groin and abdomen).

He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 23rd June 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, CREASE C

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Charles Crease, HMAT Star of England A15, 8 March 1916.

[3] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/6 – August 1916.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/8 – October 1916.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/19 – September 1917.

Percy Frederick COOPER

Percy Frederick COOPER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4750), Percy Frederick Cooper was born at Newport, Isle of Wight, England.[1]  He gave his age as 28 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as railway fettler.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8inches tall, weight 150 lbs., with a dark complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed to have 2 years and 7 months previous military service with the Howitzer Battery Royal Field Artillery.

He was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Lawson at Lawson on 7th November 1915.  The Coo-ees had held a recruiting meeting in front of the post office at Lawson the evening before.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. He completed his medical examination at Liverpool on 13th November 1915.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Parkview, West Street, Petersham, N.S.W.  His next of kin is listed as his father, H. [Henry] Cooper, 6 Bellemead Street, Newport, Isle of Wight, England.

On 8th March 1916 Private Cooper along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 Private Cooper was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Cooper left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, disembarking at Marseilles on 9th June 1916.

Private Cooper served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916 then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 17th April 1917 the 45th Battalion was training at Bresle in France, when Private Cooper was admitted to the 13th Field Ambulance suffering Rheumatism.  He was sent to the Divisional Rest Station.  On 24th April 1917 he was transferred to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station.  He was discharged to duty on 11th May 1917.  On 12th May 1917 Private Cooper returned to the 45th Battalion when it was still at Bresle, France.

Less than a month later, on 8th June 1917 the 45th Battalion was involved in the Battle of Messines in Belgium when Private Cooper was wounded in action receiving a gunshot wound to his neck and back and left knee.  He was evacuated to the 9th Field Ambulance.  On 9th June 1917 he was transferred to the 9th General Hospital at Rouen, France.  On 14th June 1917 Private Cooper was placed aboard Hospital Ship St. George for evacuation to England.  On 15th June 1917 he was admitted to the Tooting Military Hospital with gunshot wound to the right shoulder and left knee. On the 19th of July 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.

On 23rd July 1917 Private Cooper was discharged from Hospital and granted leave to report to No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott on 6th August 1917.

On 21st August 1917 Private Cooper marched in to the Overseas Training Brigade at Perham Downs.

On 17th September 1917 Private Cooper departed Southampton, England for return to France.  On 18th September 1917 Private Cooper marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 30th September 1917 Private Cooper re-joined the 45th Battalion when it was at China Wall, near Ieper (Ypres) in Belgium, after just coming out of the front line.

Just over two months later, on 5th December 1917 the 45th Battalion was at St Quentin, France, preparing to move to Peronne, when Private Cooper was sent to the 12th Australian Field Ambulance, then admitted to the 2nd Canadian General Hospital suffering Trench Fever.  On 9th December 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Convalescent Depot.

On 22nd January 1918 he was discharged and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve.

On 9th February 1918 Private Cooper returned to the 45th Battalion when it was at in the front line in the vicinity of Hollebeke, Belgium.

On 28th September 1918 Private Cooper was appointed a Lance Corporal when the Battalion was at Pissy, France.

On 1st October 1918 Lance Corporal Cooper was granted leave to England.  He re-joined the 45th Battalion on 17th October 1918 when it was at Pissy, France.  He remained with the 45th Battalion in France for the rest of the war.

On 18th January 1919 Lance Corporal Cooper was granted leave to England until 3rd February 1919.

He returned to the 45th Battalion on 14th February 1919 when it was training in the vicinity of Namur, Belgium.

On 23rd February 1919 Lance Corporal Cooper departed France bound for England to commence his return to Australia.  Lance Corporal Cooper marched into the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott on 14th March 1919.

Lance Corporal Cooper commenced his return to Australia from Devonport on 1st May 1919 aboard the H.T. China, arriving in Australia on 11th June 1919.

He was discharged medically unfit on 11th August 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, COOPER P F

[2] ‘Coo-ees at Lawson’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 12 November 1915, p. 6. Retrieved May 14, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042178

 

Thomas Henry TURVEY

Thomas Henry TURVEY

Private T. H. Turvey, of Gilgandra "Coo-ees", awarded Military Medal (Newspaper unknown, 1917)

Private T. H. Turvey, of Gilgandra “Coo-ees”, awarded Military Medal (Newspaper unknown, 1917)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4902A), Thomas Henry Turvey was born at Gulgong, N.S.W. [1]  He gave his age as 22 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as laborer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 8 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 10 lbs., with a dark complexion, light blue eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.  He completed his medical examination on 4th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain Eade at Lawson on the 7th October 1915.

Thomas Turvey stated that he had joined the Coo-ees at Katoomba in a court case in December 1915, in which he was a witness.[2]  The Coo-ees had stayed overnight at Katoomba on 5th November 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, T. [Thomas] Turvey, Gilgandra, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Turvey, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

He was transferred to the 45th Battalion on 20th May 1916.

On 7th June 1916 Private Turvey left Alexandria aboard the transport Huntspill bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

On 19th July 1916 Private Turvey was taken on strength of the 45th Battalion.

Private Turvey served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France, in July 1916, then the Battle of the Somme around Pozieres, Mouquet Farm and Flers, without injury or illness.

His service record states that he was allocated the letter “A” to his regimental number on 22nd February 1917 on account of duplication of numbers.

Private Turvey was serving with the 45th Battalion when it was in action around Guedecourt, France, where on 27th February 1917 he was recommended for, and subsequently awarded, the Military Medal for bravery in the field, for his action on the 22nd/23rd February 1917.  This award was published in the London Gazette Supplement no. 30036 on 26th April 1917, and promulgated in the Commonwealth Gazette No. 133 on 21st August 1917.[3]

The citation for the Military Medal reads: “For his gallant conduct and devotion to duty during an attack on a enemy trench near Guedecourt on the night of 22/23rd Febry. 1917 when as a runner he maintained communication overland under artillery and machine gun fire between the front line and Headquarters. His work in this respect was quite consistent with his previous fine record established for coolness and determination in the face of all obstacles”.[4]

On 7th June 1917 the 45th Battalion was involved in an attack at Messines Ridge when Private Turvey received a gunshot wound to the abdomen.  He was one of 352 members of the 45th Battalion wounded during the attack.  Another 100 were killed and 50 missing.   He was evacuated to the 77th Field Ambulance, then to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station.  On 9th June 1917 he was admitted to the 2nd Australian General Hospital at Wimereux.

On 11th June 1917 Private Turvey was placed aboard the Hospital Ship St Patrick for evacuation to England, and he was admitted to Royal Herbert Hospital at Woolwich with a gunshot wound to his right side on the same day.

On 22nd June 1917 Private Turvey was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 13th July 1917 he was discharged from hospital, and sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 27th July 1917 Private Turvey commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Demosthenes.

He arrived in Australia on 29th September 1917, and was discharged medically unfit on 1st November 1917.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, TURVEY THOMAS HENRY

[2] ‘Alleged Disloyal Conduct’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 3 December 1915, p. 4. Retrieved February 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77602826

[3] The London Gazette, 26 April 1917, Supplement 30036, p. 3948, https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30036/supplement/3948 ; Commonwealth Gazette, No. 133, 21st August 1917, p. 1786, https://www.legislation.gov.au/content/HistoricGazettes1917 (and copy in service record)

[4] Australian War Memorial. Recommendation for Military Medal, Thomas Henry Turvey, 27th February 1917, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1625170/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harold Roy Devlin UHR

Harold Roy Devlin UHR

Per his initial WWI military service record (regimental no. 5471), Harold Uhr was born at Woollahra, Sydney. He gave his age as 18 years and 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 140 lbs., with a dark complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

His “joined on” date on both his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad, and embarkation roll, was 7th November 1915, when the Coo-ees were recruiting at Lawson. He was reported as having being a Coo-ee in later newspaper articles in both the Sunday Times and The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate.[1] He appears to have been re-attested for some reason, as his service record records that he was attested, and undertook his medical examination, at Liverpool on 30th March 1916.

After the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Waratah Street, Lawson, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs K. M. [Kate] Uhr, Co/ Post Office, Wentworthville, N.S.W.

On 9th April 1916 Private Uhr departed Sydney on the HMAT Nestor A71 (along with Coo-ees Lewis Leoville and Daniel Lynch), with the 17th Reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Soon after arriving in Egypt, on 28th May 1916 Private Uhr was admitted to the 2nd Australian Stationary Hospital at Tel El Kebir, sick with Influenza. On 29th May 1916 he was transferred to the 2nd Australian General Hospital at Abassisa, Egypt.

On 10th July 1916 Private Uhr boarded the H.T. Clan McGillivray at Suez for return to Australia, suffering Rheumatism and Bronchitis. He was discharged Medically Unfit on 26th September 1916.

On 11th December 1916 he reenlisted in the Australian Imperial Force at Sydney under his full name Harold Roy Devlin Uhr, and he was allocated as reinforcement for the 17th Battalion (regimental no. 51639). However, the following month he was discharged Medically Unfit on 13th of January 1917.

On 27th July 1917 Harold Roy Devlin Uhr reenlisted for a third time in the Australian Imperial Force at Sydney (regimental no. 7115), and he was allocated to the 21st Reinforcement for the 17th Battalion.

He departed Sydney on the HMAT Euripides A14 on 31st October 1917, with the rank of Acting Corporal. During the voyage he was admitted to the ship’s hospital at sea on 14th November 1917, and was discharged the next day.

Acting Corporal Uhr arrived at Devonport, England on 25th December 1917. He was sent to the 5th Training Battalion at Fovant, England, where he reverted to the rank of Private two days later on 27th December 1917.

He was re-appointed Acting Corporal at Fovant on 25th February 1918., then reverted to the rank of Private on 31st March 1918.

Private Uhr departed England on 1st April 1918, bound for France. On 16th April 1918 he marched into the 17th Battalion, when it was in the front lines in the vicinity of Gentelles, France.

On 6th August 1918 the 17th Battalion was at Blangy Tronville, France when Private Uhr was evacuated to the 47th Casualty Clearing Station sick with Trench Fever. On 7th August 1918 Private Uhr was placed on board the 20th Ambulance Train and taken to the 10th General Hospital at Rouen, France, where he was admitted on 8th August 1918.

On 17th August 1918 he was invalided by Hospital Ship to England. He was admitted to the Bristol War Hospital on 18th August 1918.

On 26th August 1918 Private Uhr was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England. On 30th August 1918 he was granted leave, to report to the Number 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England on 13th September 1918.

On 13th October 1918 Private Uhr was admitted sick to the Number 2 Group Hospital at Hurdcott, England. He was discharged on 19th October 1918.

On 8th January 1919 Private Uhr departed England aboard the Orsova for return to Australia.

He was discharged Medically Unfit on 16th April 1919.

[1] ‘The Coo-ees, en route for Berlin, anniversary of their start’, Sunday Times, 8 October 1916 , p. 9, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article121335018 ; ‘Of the Boys’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate’, 8 February 1919 , p. 11, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86116771

 

 

William Henry PEPPERNELL

William Henry PEPPERNELL

Per his military service record (regimental no. 541), William Henry Peppernell was born at Cowra, N.S.W. He gave his age as 28 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as railway ganger. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 152 lbs., with a ruddy complexion, brown eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed 12 months previous military experience in the Mullion Creek Rifle Club.

‘W. Peppernal (ganger)’ was named in the Western Age on 3rd November 1915 as one of ‘three young men, railway employees’, that enlisted at the conclusion of a recruitment meeting held in Canbelego [which is near Cobar], at which Private Fern, M.L.A. spoke, that would ‘leave Canbelego by train on Tuesday, and join the Coo-ees beyond Bathurst’.[1]

His postal address on his initial Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form dated 30th October 1915 was ‘Canbelego’, and he undertook a Preliminary medical examination at Canbelego on the same date.

He was attested by Captain Eade on 7th November 1915 at Lawson (when the Coo-ees were at Lawson), and completed his medical on 13th November at Liverpool.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 19th February 1916 he transferred to B Company in the 36th Battalion, to join his two brothers Frederick and Henry who had enlisted in January 1916.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Kerr’s Creek, Orange, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs Annie Peppernell, at the same address.

On 13th May 1916 Private Peppernell (along with his two brothers) departed Sydney on the HMAT Beltana A72, arriving in Devonport, England, on the 9th July 1916.

After spending the next four months in England with the 36th Battalion in training, Private Peppernell on 22nd November 1916 departed from Southampton, England, bound for France.

Private Peppernell was with the 36th Battalion when it moved into the trenches on the Western Front in early December 1916.

His brother Private Frederick Peppernell (regimental no. 535), was with him in the 36th Battalion during the Battle of Messines in Belgium, when his brother was killed in action on 7th June 1917. The Australian Red Cross Society Wounded and Missing Enquiry Bureau Files record Private W.H. Peppernell’s statement made on 6th November 1917: ‘My brother F. Peppernell went out with me in a carrying party for the Messines advance. I saw him last about 30 yards in front of me. The enemy was sniping us and I told him to take cover. He got into a shell hole and I did not see him again. I enquired at the Clearing Station by could hear nothing of him. I have heard since from home in Australia that he has been killed’.[2]

On the 12th of October 1917 the 36th Battalion was involved in an unsuccessful attack to capture Passchendaele Ridge near the village of Passchendaele (First Battle for Passchendaele) during the ongoing Third Battle of Ypres in Belgium. During this attack Private Peppernell was wounded in action, receiving a gunshot wound to his right knee, and he was admitted to the 3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Station.

He was evacuated to England on Hospital Ship Carisbrooke Castle on 20th October 1917, and was admitted to Voluntary Aid Detachment Hospital Cheltenham Area with a gun shot wound to right thigh slight on 21st October 1917.

Private Peppernell was given leave from 21st November 1917 to 5th December 1917, then reported to No. 1 Command Depot.

On 3rd January 1918 Private Peppernell departed Southampton to France. On 10th January 1918 he rejoined the 36th Battalion in Belgium.

On 12th March 1918 Private Peppernell was promoted to Lance Corporal.

Lance Corporal Peppernell was recommended (but not awarded) a Military Medal for his actions on 4th April 1918, while the 36th Battalion helped to defeat a major attack by the Germans on Villers-Bretonneux in France. The recommendation reads:

William Henry PEPPERNELL. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Previous to the launching of a counter-attack by his Battalion on the 4th April 1918, and when the enemy was advancing in force, L/Cpl. PEPPERNELL went forward under heavy fire and located the enemy, affording valuable information to his Company Commander which enabled him to avoid heavy casualties. Decoration recommended MM.[3]

The 36th Battalion was disbanded on 30th April 1918 to reinforce other units, and Lance Corporal Peppernell was transferred to the 33rd Battalion in France.

On 4th June 1918, Lance Corporal Peppernell was wounded in action for a second time, with a gun shot wound to the left arm, while the 33rd Battalion was in in the vicinity of Villers-Bretonneux in France.

He was taken first to the 10th Australian Field Ambulance, then to the 5th Casualty Clearing Station. He was admitted to the 12th General Hospital in Rouen on 8th April 1918.   On 10th June 1918 he was evacuated to England.

On 11th June 1918 Lance Corporal Peppenell was admitted to Horton County of London War Hospital in England with gun shot to the left arm, severe.

On 26th June 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Auxiliary Hospital in Dartford.

On 1st July 1918 he was discharged to No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott.

On 26th August 1918 Lance Corporal Peppenell was admitted to 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital in Bulford. He was discharged to Convalescent Training Depot, Parkhouse, on 28th August 1918.

On 11th October 1918 he was transferred to No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny.

Lance Corporal Peppernell commenced his return to Australia on the HMAT Orsova on 8th January 1919. He arrived in Australia on 3rd March 1919.

The Leader reported that Lance Corporal Peppernell was welcomed at Kerr’s Creek Railway Station on 10th March 1919 by a large number of residents, and a welcome home function was held that Friday evening, where he was presented with a medal which was inscribed with his name and battalion colours.[4]

He was discharged medically unfit on 10th April 1919.

 

[1] ‘Canbelego News’,Western Age, 3 November 1915, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136727753

[2] 535 Frederick Peppernell, Red Cross Wounded and Missing Enquiry Bureau Files, 1914-1918 War 1DRL/0428, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1499936/

[3] Australian War Memorial, Honours and Awards: William Henry Peppernell, Lance Corporal, 36th Australian Infantry Battalion, First World War, 1914-1918, Recommendation: Military Medal, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1622124/

[4] ‘Kerr’s Creek welcome’, Leader, 17 March 1919, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117856950 ; ‘Kerr’s Creek’, Leader, 7 April 1919, p. 5, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117857839

 

 

 

Rowland John WILSON

 Rowland John WILSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4910), Rowland John Wilson was born at Tallawang, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 24 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 10 stone 6 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had 3 months experience with the Lawson Rifle Club. The “Joined on” date on his Attestation Paper was 7th November 1915.  He was attested at Lawson on 7th November 1915.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. He completed his medical examination at Liverpool on 15th November 1915.

On his embarkation roll he is listed under the name Ronald John Wilson, and his address at time of enrolment was Queens Road, Lawson, N.S.W.  His next of kin is listed as his brother [i.e. uncle], P. J. Wilson, Queens Road, Lawson, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Wilson along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916. On the 19th April 1916 Private Wilson was transferred to the 45th Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Wilson left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 8th June 1916.

Private Wilson served with the 45th Battalion during its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916. Private Wilson then moved with the 45th Battalion to Pozieres, France, in early August 1916.

Private Wilson was killed on the night of the 7th/8th August 1916 when the 45th Battalion was under heavy enemy artillery fire between Pozieres and Martinpuich in the Battle of Pozieres – the same night that fellow Coo-ee William Emerton Hunter was killed, who was also in the 45th Battalion.

Private Wilson’s date of death is recorded as 8th August 1916. He has no known grave.

Private Wilson is remembered on the Australian National Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux in France.

Private Wilson's name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Wilson’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Wilson’s name is commemorated on panel 141 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

His name is also remembered on the Lawson War Memorial.

[1] NAA: B2455, WILSON R J

Lightfoot Lamonby HAMPSON

Lightfoot Lamonby HAMPSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4790), Lightfoot Lamonby Hampson was born at Wigton, Cumberland, England. He gave his age as 37 years, his marital status as married, and his occupation as painter.  He had worked at the ironworks in Lithgow prior to enlisting. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 5 inches tall, with a medium dark, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Baptist. He claimed that he had 3 years experience in the Militia. He completed his medical on the 6th November at Lawson (on the day the Coo-ees arrived at Lawson), but was not attested until the 13th November 1915 at Liverpool (after the end of the march). His date of joining on the nominal roll was the 9th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at Penrith).

After the end of the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp with his son Charles Alfred Hampson (who had joined the Coo-ees at Lithgow) as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll Lightfoot Hampson’s address at time of enrolment was Redgalein, Hussans [sic]Walls Road, Lithgow, N.S.W. (the same as his son Charles’s address), and his next of kin is listed as sister-in-law, guardian of his children, Mrs. L. Hampson, Wanderee, Ferry Street, Drummoyne, N.S.W. (Lightfoot Hampson had four children – the eldest Charles Alfred Hampson who he had decided to enlist with on the Coo-ee March, and three younger sons, and one daughter).

On 8th March 1916 Private Hampson departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, accompanied by his son Charles, and many of the other Coo-ees. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Gunner Hampson was transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Tel-el-Kebir (along with his son Charles).

On 21st April 1916 he was taken on the strength of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade and posted to the 10th Brigade Ammunition Column at Serapeum (along with his son Charles). On the 27th May they were both taken on strength of the 4th Division Ammunition Column.

On 6th June 1916 Gunner Hampson left Alexandria aboard the HMT Oriana (along with his son Charles) bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 13th June 1916.

On 29th June 1916 Gunner Hampson’s designation was changed to Driver. (His son Charles was also mustered as Driver on the same day).

On 23rd August 1916 the 4th Division Ammunition Column was at Acquin, France when Driver Hampson was evacuated with Influenza. On 30th August 1916 he was admitted to the 4th Stationary Hospital at St Omer, France. He was returned to his unit on the 10th September 1916.

On 18th September 1916 he attended the Trench Mortar School at Berthen (along with his son Charles). On 30th September 1916 they both rejoined the 4th Division Ammunition Column when it was at Vlamertinghe near Ypres, Belgium.

On 5th November 1916 Driver Hampson reverted back to Gunner at his own request. (His son Charles also reverted to Gunner at his own request on the same day).

On 22nd December 1916 he and his son Charles were both transferred to the 10th Field Artillery Brigade which was in the Somme Sector near Flers, France, and were posted to the 110th Howitzer Battery.

According to the 10th Australian Field Artillery Brigade unit war diary, on 28th April 1917 the 110th Howitzer Battery was carrying out a gas shell bombardment on the village of Riencourt-les-Cagnicourt during the 1st Battle of Bullecourt. His son Gunner Charles Hampson was killed in action on this day. The loss of the son who he had enlisted with, embarked overseas with, trained in Egypt with, and fought alongside in France with, must have been devastating for Lightfoot Hampson.

On 6th May 1917 the 10th Field Artillery Brigade was in action during the Battle of Bullecourt when Gunner Hampson was wounded in action by German counter battery fire. He received wounds to his back and face. Gunner Hampson was evacuated to the 23rd Field Ambulance. On 7th May 1917 he was moved to the 45th Casualty Clearing Station. On 8th May he was placed aboard the 4th Ambulance Train and conveyed to the 6th General Hospital at Rouen, France. On 13th May 1917 he was transferred to a Convalescent Depot. On 12th June 1917 Gunner Hampson was discharged and sent to the Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 29th June 1917 Gunner Hampson rejoined the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.

On 8th December 1917 Gunner Hampson was detached to attend a course at the 2nd Army School. He rejoined the Brigade on 7th January 1918 when it was in the vicinity of Hollebeke, Belgium.

On 1st September 1918 Gunner Hampson was granted leave in England. He returned to the 10th Field Artillery Brigade on 20th September 1918 when it was in action in the vicinity of Villeret, France.

On 4th March 1919 Gunner Hampson left his unit bound for the Base Depot at Le Havre to commence his return to Australia. On 13th March 1919 he departed Le Havre bound for England. He arrived at Weymouth, England, on 14th March 1919, marching into the Number 4 Command Depot.

On 1st May 1919 Gunner Hampson departed England aboard the China to return to Australia. He arrived in Australia on 11th June 1919, and was discharged on 26th July 1919.

Thomas THORNE

Thomas THORNE

Mrs Thorne with her son Thomas Thorne who joined at Lawson (Mirror of Australia 13/11/1915)

Mrs Thorne with her son Thomas Thorne who joined at Lawson (Mirror of Australia 13/11/1915)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4903), Thomas Thorne was born at Hay, N.S.W. He gave his age as 22 years and 2 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as motor driver. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 140 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to have 6 months experience with the Lawson Rifle Club. He joined the Coo-ee March at Lawson, and was attested at Lawson on the 7th November 1915.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.  He completed his medical at Liverpool on the 13th November 1915.

On Private Thorne’s embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Christabell Street, Lawson, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as wife, Mrs. M. A. Thorne, C/o Mrs Page, Casino, Carr-Street, Coogee, N.S.W.

Along with many of the Coo-ees, Private Thorne departed Sydney on the HMAT Star of England on the 8th March 1916, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

Following being admitted ill on the 11th April 1916 to the 31st General Hospital in Port Said, Egypt, he marched in to 4th Training Battalion, Egypt on 21st May 1916.

The name and embarkation date of the transport ship that took Thomas Thorne to England from Egypt is not recorded in his service record. The next entry in his service record notes Acting Sergeant Thorne admitted to Devonport Military Hospital on 16th June 1916, and then his death two days later of Pneumonia on 18th June 1916.

According to a letter from the Matron at the hospital in the Australian Red Cross Society Wounded and Missing Enquiry Bureau files, 1914-18 War 1DRL/0428  on the Australian War Memorial website, ‘Thorne was admitted to this hospital from the transport upon which he arrived in England on the 17-6-16. He was very ill with Broncho Pneumonia & the Doctors gave no hope of his recovery. He lived until the following day the 18-6-16 when passed peacefully away at 4.30 p.m.’

Thomas Thorne’s headstone at Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery, England (Photograph: H. Thompson 24/8/2014)

Thomas Thorne’s headstone at Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery, England (Photograph: H. Thompson 24/8/2014)

Sergeant Thorne was buried at Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery in Plymouth, Devon, England, on the 21st June 1916 with full military honours.

Thomas Thorne’s name is also listed on the Lawson War Memorial.