Tag Archives: Gilgandra recruits

Tyson RYAN

Tyson RYAN

Per his military service record (regimental no. N21449), Tyson Ryan was born in Gilgandra, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 18 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as horse trainer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 9 stone 3 lbs., with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was recorded as being Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military experience.

His next of kin was recorded on his Australian Imperial Force Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad form as his father, Michael Ryan, Dubbo Road, Gilgandra.  Both his parents (Michael and Mary Ann Ryan) signed their names giving their consent for their son to enlist on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form.

He completed his medical examination at Gilgandra on 29th October 1915 (19 days after the start of the Coo-ee March).

He caught up with the Coo-ees, and was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Lawson on 7th November 1915 (the day the Coo-ees rested at Lawson).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 6th Australian Light Horse Regiment.

Trooper Ryan forfeited 10 days pay for being absent without leave on 10th and  11th January 1916.

On 14th January 1916 Trooper Ryan was fined £10 for assaulting police during a riot.

He was fined 1 shilling, and confined to barracks for 7 days, for being absent without leave on 13th March 1916.

He was fined 1 shilling for neglect of duty and being late on 6 am parade on 6th May 1916.

On 15th May 1916 Trooper Ryan was fined £1 at Menangle Park for using threatening language to an N.C.O.

On the 19th of May 1916 Trooper Ryan was discharged unlikely to become an efficient soldier.

He attempted to re-enlist in 1917, however he was rejected as medically unfit.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, RYAN TYSON

Herbert William SPICER

Herbert William SPICER

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4897), ‘William Herbert Spicer’ was born at Wimmin, Victoria.[1]  (He signed his name Herbert William Spicer on his Attestation Paper, and other official records record his name as Herbert William Spicer, so it appears  his first and middle name may have not have been recorded in the correct order  on his service record). [2] He gave his age as 21 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farm labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 9 stone 6 lbs., with a fair complexion, gray eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his Certificate of Medical Examination at Gilgandra on 12th October 1915, two days after the commencement of the Coo-ee March.  It is not clear exactly where he caught up with the Coo-ees, but he had joined them by the time they arrived at Wellington, as his Certificate of Medical Examination was co-signed at Wellington on 16th October 1915 (the day the Coo-ees arrived at that town).  He was attested by Captain T. A. Nicholas at Stuart Town on 20th October 1915.

After the Coo-ee March he went into Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On the 31st of January 1916 Private Spicer was charged with being absent from parade. He was fined 5 shillings.

The Dimboola Banner and Wimmera and Mallee Advertiser reported on 31st March 1916 that ‘Private Herbert Spencer, youngest son of Mr F. W. Spicer, of Lochiel, who enlisted at Gilgandra, N.S.W., was one of the famous “Coo-ees,” who marched 320 miles to Sydney’.[3]  This information was provided to this newspaper by his brother-in-law, Mr. A. A. Fechner, formerly of Dimboola, who had moved to Gilgandra with his wife Lily (Herbert’s sister) about 1911.[4]

‘H. Spicer’ was presented with a watch and a wallet at a send-off held for the Gilgandra Coo-ees at the Australian Hall in Gilgandra on Friday 3rd March 1916.[5]

His name was recorded as ‘Herbert Spicer’ on his embarkation roll, and his address at time of enrolment was ‘Gilgandra’.  His next of kin was listed as his father, F. [Frederick William] Spicer, Dimboola, Victoria.

On 8th March 1916 Private Spicer departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company (along with fellow Coo-ees Private Richardson and Private Megarrity).

On 17th June 1916 Private Spicer left Alexandria aboard the Transport Manitou bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 25th June 1916.

On 8th July 1916 Private Spicer was attached to the 2nd ANZAC Headquarters as escort to the G.O.C. [General Officer Commanding] in France.  He was detached to join the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion on 28th September 1916.

On 10th October 1916 Private Spicer commenced a training course at the Signals School. He returned to his unit on 27th December 1916.

On 3rd February 1917 Private Spicer was charged with conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline, in that he did upon being issued with his rum contrary to regulations, hand it to another soldier. He was awarded 3 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 26th March 1917 Private Spicer was detached for duty with the 2nd ANZAC Corps Anti-Aircraft Section.

He returned to his unit from this detachment on 19th of May 1917.

On 21st May 1917 he was detached for duty with the A.P.M. [Assistant Provost Marshal] 2nd ANZAC Corps.  He rejoined his unit on 5th June 1917.

On 23rd July 1917 he was sent to the Power Buzzer School. He returned to his unit on 1st August 1917.

On 4th August 1917 Private Spicer went on leave.  He returned from leave on 16th August 1917.

On 10th September 1917 the 2nd ANZAC Cyclist Battalion commenced work burying cable in the vicinity of La Clytte, Belgium, when the working parties came under attack by gas shelling.[6] Private Spicer was one of 43 men in his unit evacuated the next day with mustard gas poisoning. He was taken first to the 103rd Field Ambulance, then to the 9th Casualty Clearing Station, and the 11th Casualty Clearing Station.

On 12th September 1917 Private Spicer was placed aboard the 21st Ambulance Train for evacuation to the 53rd General Hospital at Boulogne, France.

On 23rd September 1917 he was transferred to the 1st Convalescent Depot at Boulogne. On 25th September 1917 he was transferred to the 10th Convalescent Depot.

On 18th November  1917 Private Spicer marched into the Base Depot at Le Harve, France. He rejoined his Battalion on 25th November 1917.

On 30th November 1917 Private Spicer was sent to the 43rd Field Ambulance, then back to the 10th Casualty Clearing Station sick. On 1st December 1917 he was placed aboard the 5th Ambulance Train.  He arrived at the 9th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France, on 2nd December 1917. On 4th December 1917 he was transferred to the 29th General Hospital at Boulogne.

He was discharged to Base Depot on 2nd February 1918. He rejoined his Battalion on 7th February 1918.

On 25th March 1918 Private Spicer was detached for duty with the 1st Australian Division Signals Company.

On 13th September 1918 Private Spicer went on leave to England.  He returned from leave on 29th September 1918.

On 24th January 1919 Private Spicer was officially transferred to the 1st Australian Division Signals Company.

On 4th June 1919 Private Spicer departed France to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at No. 1 Group at Longbridge, England, on 5th June 1919.

On 4th July 1919 Private Spicer departed England aboard the H.T. Norman bound for Australia.

He arrived in Sydney on 20th August 1919, and was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 12th October 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, SPICER HERBERT WILLIAM

[2] Herbert William Spicer, Victorian Birth Registration, 1896, Reg. no. 22234.

[3] ‘News and Notes’, Dimboola Banner and Wimmera and Mallee Advertiser,  31 March 1916, p. 2. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article152834929

[4] ‘Obituary’, Gilgandra Weekly and Castlereagh, 18 June 1936, p. 4. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113030512

[5] ‘Our Soldiers’ Column’, Gilgandra Weekly, 10 March 1916, p. 14. Retrieved July 25, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119923509

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 12/2 – 2nd ANZAC Corps Cyclist Battalion, AWM4 12/2/15 – September 1917.

Thomas Henry TURVEY

Thomas Henry TURVEY

Private T. H. Turvey, of Gilgandra "Coo-ees", awarded Military Medal (Newspaper unknown, 1917)

Private T. H. Turvey, of Gilgandra “Coo-ees”, awarded Military Medal (Newspaper unknown, 1917)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4902A), Thomas Henry Turvey was born at Gulgong, N.S.W. [1]  He gave his age as 22 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as laborer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 8 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 10 lbs., with a dark complexion, light blue eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.  He completed his medical examination on 4th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain Eade at Lawson on the 7th October 1915.

Thomas Turvey stated that he had joined the Coo-ees at Katoomba in a court case in December 1915, in which he was a witness.[2]  The Coo-ees had stayed overnight at Katoomba on 5th November 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, T. [Thomas] Turvey, Gilgandra, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Turvey, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

He was transferred to the 45th Battalion on 20th May 1916.

On 7th June 1916 Private Turvey left Alexandria aboard the transport Huntspill bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

On 19th July 1916 Private Turvey was taken on strength of the 45th Battalion.

Private Turvey served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France, in July 1916, then the Battle of the Somme around Pozieres, Mouquet Farm and Flers, without injury or illness.

His service record states that he was allocated the letter “A” to his regimental number on 22nd February 1917 on account of duplication of numbers.

Private Turvey was serving with the 45th Battalion when it was in action around Guedecourt, France, where on 27th February 1917 he was recommended for, and subsequently awarded, the Military Medal for bravery in the field, for his action on the 22nd/23rd February 1917.  This award was published in the London Gazette Supplement no. 30036 on 26th April 1917, and promulgated in the Commonwealth Gazette No. 133 on 21st August 1917.[3]

The citation for the Military Medal reads: “For his gallant conduct and devotion to duty during an attack on a enemy trench near Guedecourt on the night of 22/23rd Febry. 1917 when as a runner he maintained communication overland under artillery and machine gun fire between the front line and Headquarters. His work in this respect was quite consistent with his previous fine record established for coolness and determination in the face of all obstacles”.[4]

On 7th June 1917 the 45th Battalion was involved in an attack at Messines Ridge when Private Turvey received a gunshot wound to the abdomen.  He was one of 352 members of the 45th Battalion wounded during the attack.  Another 100 were killed and 50 missing.   He was evacuated to the 77th Field Ambulance, then to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station.  On 9th June 1917 he was admitted to the 2nd Australian General Hospital at Wimereux.

On 11th June 1917 Private Turvey was placed aboard the Hospital Ship St Patrick for evacuation to England, and he was admitted to Royal Herbert Hospital at Woolwich with a gunshot wound to his right side on the same day.

On 22nd June 1917 Private Turvey was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 13th July 1917 he was discharged from hospital, and sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 27th July 1917 Private Turvey commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Demosthenes.

He arrived in Australia on 29th September 1917, and was discharged medically unfit on 1st November 1917.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, TURVEY THOMAS HENRY

[2] ‘Alleged Disloyal Conduct’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 3 December 1915, p. 4. Retrieved February 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77602826

[3] The London Gazette, 26 April 1917, Supplement 30036, p. 3948, https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30036/supplement/3948 ; Commonwealth Gazette, No. 133, 21st August 1917, p. 1786, https://www.legislation.gov.au/content/HistoricGazettes1917 (and copy in service record)

[4] Australian War Memorial. Recommendation for Military Medal, Thomas Henry Turvey, 27th February 1917, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1625170/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alfred WARDROP

Alfred WARDROP

Alfred Wardrop (Courtesy of Gary Wardrop)

Alfred Wardrop (Courtesy of Gary Wardrop)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4908), Alfred Wardrop was born at Pyramul, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 28 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as ‘no particular trade’. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 11 stone, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on 7th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Gilgandra on 9th October 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The people of his home town of Pyramul gave him a farewell social and presentation when he was home on leave in February 1916.[2]

Along with fellow Coo-ees Privates W. Howard, J. Maher, C. Marchant, V. Quinton, L. L. Maguire, L. Greenleaf, T. Turvey, H. Baxter, and Signallers A. Lynne and J. Quinn, Private Wardrop was ‘entertained at a monster send-off’ in the Australian Hall on Friday, 3rd March 1916, when in Gilgandra on final leave.[3]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was ‘Pyramel’ [sic], via Mudgee, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, R. Wardrup, at the same address.  His trade or calling was recorded as labourer.

On 8th March 1916 Private Maguire along with many of the other Coo-ees departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

After arriving in Egypt he was transferred to the 45th Battalion on the 19th April 1916.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Wardrop left Alexandria aboard the Transport Kinafauns Castle bound for France, and arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Wardrop served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916, then as it moved to Pozieres in early August 1916.

On 16th August 1916 the 45th Battalion had just been relieved from the front line trenches between Pozieres and Martinpuich, France. Private Wardrop had suffered a gun shot wound to his right hand, and was evacuated to the 44th Casualty Clearing Station.  He was then moved by Ambulance Train, and admitted to the 9th General Hospital at Rouen, France on 17th August 1916.

On 21st August 1916 he was sent by the Hospital Ship Asturias to England. On 22nd August 1916 he was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth, London, England.

On 8th September 1916 Private Wardrop was discharged from Hospital, and granted leave.  On 27th  September 1916 he reported back from leave to the No. 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England.

On 11th November 1916 Private Wardrop departed England for return to France.

On 13th November 1916 he marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 4th of December 1916 Private Wardrop rejoined the 45th Battalion when it was resting at Dernacourt, France.

On 23rd February 1917 Private Wardrop was with the 45th Battalion when it was engaged in action in the vicinity of Stormy Trench, north east of Guedecourt, France, when he was wounded in action, receiving gunshot wounds to his left foot and left leg, and right thigh.  He was evacuated to the 14th Australian Field Ambulance, then back to the 45th Casualty Clearing Station.

On 26th February 1917 Private Wardrop was placed aboard the 31st Ambulance Train, and moved to the St Johns Ambulance Brigade Hospital at Etaples, France.

On 12th March 1917 his left foot was amputated three inches above the ankle.

On 13th March 1917 he was evacuated to hospital in England from Le Havre aboard the Hospital Ship Gloucester Castle.

On 14th March 1917 Private Wardrop was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth, England.

While he was recovering in this hospital, he wrote a letter home to his mother in Pyramul, which was published in the Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative, in which he wrote: “[Sending] a line to let you know that I am getting along well now. … I am in the same hospital now as I was when I was wounded before, but I cannot get [around] like I could before. I am wounded pretty badly this time, but am over the worst of it now  … I have no pain at all. I [had] my left foot off above the [ankle], a wound in the thigh on the … leg, and one under the knee on the right leg … I … go back to Australia after a few months. You have no need to worry about me in any way, as I am getting along fine, and am as happy as I ever I was. I will be able to get up in a chair in a few weeks. The same shell got [five] others, killing three – and wounding three of us. I was one of the lucky ones again, as I was between two of my mates who were killed”.[4]

On 15th September 1917 Private Wardrop was transferred to the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Southall, England.

On 4th October 1917 Private Wardrop was granted leave to report back to the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital on 18th October 1917.

He was granted leave again from 3rd January 1918 to 6th January 1918.

Private Wardrop commenced his return to Australia on 10th January 1918 aboard the H.T. Corinthic.

He arrived in Sydney on 7th March 1918.

He was discharged medically unfit on 6th September 1918.

[1] NAA: B2455, WARDROP ALFRED

[2] ‘Pyramul’, Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative, 21 February 1916, p. 2. Retrieved February 7, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article156945383

[3] ‘District News’, Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative, 9 March 1916, p. 30. Retrieved February 7, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article156951725

[4] ‘Wounded in France’, Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative, 28 May 1917, p. 4. Retrieved February 7, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article157120908

 

William SMITH (4602 Gilgandra)

William SMITH (4602 Gilgandra)

Per his initial military service record (Depot), William Smith was born at Gilgandra, N.S.W.  He gave his age as 19 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 11 stone, with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was Presbyterian.  William Smith completed his medical examination at Gilgandra on 11th October 1915 (the day after the Coo-ees had left Gilgandra), but was not attested by Captain Nicholas until when the Coo-ees were at Stuart Town on 20th October 1915.  He claimed to have previous military experience in the Gilgandra Rifle Club.

It is unclear exactly where William Smith caught up with the Coo-ees, but his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form dated 11th October 1915 was addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Eumungerie, so it appears his intent was to catch up with the Coo-ees at Eumungerie.  His parents Thomas E. Smith and Margaret E. Smith both signed this form to give their consent, as he was under 21 years of age.   His “Joined on” date on his Attestation Paper was 19th October 1915 (when the Coo-ees were marching from Dripstone to Stuart Town).

He was known as one of Gilgandra’s 35 recruits.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp for training.

Private Smith was examined by a Medical Board at Liverpool Camp, and was discharged as medically unfit on 29th November 1915.

On 1st November 1916 William Smith re-enlisted at Dubbo, and was appointed to Dubbo Depot Battalion.  This Attestation Paper listed his occupation as grocer, and his age as 21 years.  He claimed that he had previous military in the A.I.F., and that he had been discharged due to sickness.

On 9th November 1916 he was transferred to the reinforcements for the 30th Battalion at Liverpool Camp.

On Private Smith’s embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Newtown, Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs Emma Smith, at the same address.

Private Smith departed Sydney on the HMAT Beltana A72 on 25th November 1916 with the 12th reinforcements for the 30th Battalion.

He arrived at Devonport, England, on 29th January1917, and marched into the 8th Training Battalion at Hurdcott, England.

On 31st January 1917 Private Smith was sent to the Camp 10 Hospital at Hurdcott sick.  On 1st February 1917 he was transferred to the Fovant Military Hospital with Mumps.  He was discharged on 15th February 1917 and sent back to the 8th Training Battalion.

Five months later, on 14th July 1917 Private Smith was again admitted to the Camp 10 hospital sick.  He was discharged and returned to the 8th Training Battalion on the 23rd of July 1917.

On 29th August 1917 Private Smith was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 28th August 1917 until brought back to camp under escort on 11th September 1917.  He was awarded 14 days detention, and forfeited 33 days pay.  He entered Woking Detention Barracks to serve his sentence on 21st September 1917.

On 5th November 1917 Private Smith marched in to the 14th Training Battalion at Codford, England, from the 8th Training Battalion.

On 29th November 1917 Private Smith was charged again with being absent without leave from midnight on 18th November 1917 to 8.15 pm on 24th November 1917.  He was awarded 14 days field punishment No. 2, and forfeited 20 days pay.

On 4th of December 1917 Private Smith proceeded overseas from Southampton to France to reinforce the 56th Battalion.

Upon arrival in France he was sent to the 5th Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 8th December 1917 he was sent to march out to his unit.

On 11th December 1917, Private Smith was charged with when on active service absenting himself from entrainment on 9th December 1917.  He was awarded 28 days field punishment No. 2 on 11th December 1917.

Private Smith was taken on strength of the 56th Battalion on 13th December 1917, when it was moving from Kemmel, Belgium to Desvres, France.

On 15th January 1918 the 56th Battalion was conducting training at Tingry, France, when Private Smith was sent to the 5th Australian Field Ambulance sick.  He was admitted to a General Hospital in Etaples on 17th January 1918.  On 26th January 1918 he was discharged from hospital to the Australian Infantry Base Depot. .

He marched out to his unit from the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Harve on 3rd February 1918.  He rejoined the 56th Battalion on the 17th of February 1918 when it was in the vicinity of Hollebeke, Belgium.

On 20th February 1918 Private Smith was detached for duty with the 14th Field Company Engineers.

A week later, on 27th February 1918 he was sent to the 14th Australian Field Ambulance with Defective Vision.  He was discharged on the 1st of March 1918, and rejoined the Battalion when it was in reserve at Wytschaete, Belgium.

Three weeks later, on 21st March 1918 Private Smith was sent to the 15th Australian Field Ambulance sick with Bronchitis.  He was moved to the 5th Division Rest Station later that day.  On the 22nd of March 1918 he was moved to the 13th Casualty Clearing Station.

On 2nd April 1918 Private Smith was taken by ambulance train and admitted sick to the 55th General Hospital at Boulogne, France.  On 9th April 1918 he was admitted to No. 7 Convalescent Depot at Boulogne.  He was moved to No. 10 Convalescent Depot at Ecault, France, on 11th April 1918.

He was discharged on 25th April 1918, and sent to the  Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 24th May 1918 he marched out to his unit.

On 1st June 1918 Private Smith was charged with drunkenness on 31st May 1918.  He was fined 10 shillings.

On 2nd June 1918 Private Smith rejoined the 56th Battalion when it was conducting training at Bussy Les Daours, France.

On 27th June 1918 Private Smith was charged with being absent from 8.45 am parade without permission.   He was awarded 2 days field punishment No. 2 on 28th June 1918.

On 21st December 1918 the 56th Battalion had just marched to Sivry in Belgium the day before to set up camp for the winter, when Private Smith was sent to the 56th Casualty Clearing Station sick.  On the 23rd of December 1918 he was admitted to the 7th General Hospital sick at Wimereux, France.  On the 24th of December 1918 he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital at Le Harve, France.

Private Smith was transferred to England on the H.T. St. Patrick on 15th January 1919.  On 16th January 1919 he was admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England.

He was discharged on the 7th of March 1919 and transferred to the Convalescent Training Depot at Parkhouse, England.

On 11th March 1919 Private Smith was re-admitted sick to the 1st Australian Determatological Hospital at Bulford, England.

On 11th April 1919 Private Smith was charged with being out of bounds and being in possession of a Khaki uniform whilst a patient at the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital.  He was awarded 27 days detention and fined 27 days pay.

On 12th April 1919 Private Smith was admitted to the Lewes Detention Barracks to undergo his sentence.

He was released on 7th May 1919, and returned to the 1st Australian Determatological Hospital.

On 10th May 1919 Private Smith was transferred to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Sutton Veny, England.

He was discharged on 2nd June 1919, and transferred to the Number 5 Group at Weymouth, England.

Private Smith commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Friedrichsruh on 8th July 1919.

He arrived in Australia on 4th September 1919, and was discharged at Sydney on 12th October 1919.

Albert Warren PEARCE

Albert Warren PEARCE

Per his military service record (Depot), Albert Warren Pearce was born at Richmond, N.S.W. He gave his age as 38 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 6 feet tall, weight 12 stone 7 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed to have had six years previous military service in the Royal Australian Artillery. He completed his medical on 7th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain Nicholas on 9th October 1915 at Gilgandra.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Following a further medical examination before the Medical Board after arriving at Liverpool Camp with the Coo-ees, Private Pearce was discharged on 29th November 1915 as medically unfit, with defective vision.

On 21st March 1916 Albert Warren Pearce re-enlisted at Dubbo, N.S.W. He passed his medical examination, and was attested at Dubbo, on 23rd March 1916. He trained at Dubbo Depot Company as a reinforcement for the 46th Battalion, until 17th April 1916.

Private Pearce was transferred to Liverpool Camp on 18th April 1916, as reinforcement for the 1st Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Teroit Street, Richmond, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed his mother, J. [Jane] Pearce, at the same address.

On 9th September 1916 Private Pearce (regimental no. 6296) departed Sydney on the HMAT A14 Euripides with the 20th reinforcements for the 1st Battalion.

Private Pearce disembarked at Plymouth, England, on 26th October 1916, and he was sent to the 1st Training Battalion.

On 21st November 1916 Private Pearce marched into camp at Fovant from No. 3 Command Depot at Wool in England. He was later moved to No. 7 Camp at Lark Hill, England.

On 23rd June 1917 he was transferred from the 1st Training Battalion to the 17th Field Ambulance, that was forming at Durrington, England.

On 25th October 1917 the 17th Field Ambulance was disbanded, and Private Pearce was sent to the Australian Army Medical Corps Training Depot at Park House, England.

On 4th November 1917 he was attached to the Group Hospital Sutton Veny, England for duty.

Private Pearce left Avonmouth near Bristol, England, on 2nd of January 1919 aboard the SS Karmala, to return to Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 25th February 1919. He was discharged medically unfit due to defective vision on 13th April 1919.

John Robert LEE

John Robert LEE

Lieutenant J. R. Lee (Sydney Mail, 3/3/1920)

Lieutenant J. R. Lee (Sydney Mail, 3/3/1920)

Per his military service record (Lieutenant) John Robert Lee was born at Lancaster, Durham, England. He gave his age as 29 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as water engineer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 11 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 7 lbs., with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Methodist. He claimed to have previous military service with the Gilgandra Rifle Club. He completed his medical on the 7th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Gilgandra on the 9th October 1915.

On the Coo-ee March Private Lee was made an acting Quarter Master Sergeant in the travelling committee of control appointed for the Coo-ee March at Stuart Town, with Major Wynne as chairman, Captain Hitchen, Mr H. T. Blacket, and Acting Sergeant Stephens as Secretary, during a visit by A. H. Miller (Secretary), and C. H. Richards and P. J. MacManus, from the Gilgandra Recruiting Committee.[1] In this role he was a recruiting speaker on the march.[2] He gave many of the recruiting speeches on the march from Gilgandra to Sydney.

John Robert Lee had been brought to Australia by the Methodist Home Missionary Society in 1911, and he was sent initially to Leeton, where he established the first Methodist church in that town.[3]  The Rev. J. R. Lee had been appointed a probationary clergyman at Gilgandra in 1913, but following his transfer elsewhere after this 12 month appointment, he had resigned from the ministry to take up farming near Gilgandra in 1914, where he remained a lay preacher, before joining the Coo-ee March.[4]

The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate reported on ‘his powerful recruiting speech’ at Dubbo:

‘He said that the “Coo-ees” were deeply sensible of the warm-hearted receptions they had been accorded so far, and they hoped that there would be hundreds of them by the time they reached Sydney. They hoped this idea of Captain Hitchen’s would be an inspiration to the young men all along the route. Personally, he was glad to do what he could to get Australia to realise the seriousness of the situation and the obligation of service… “The  ‘Coo-ees’ are after men,” cried Mr. Lee, “and we want you. There never was a time when your country more needed you. I hope every young man will realise the position as Hitchen’s ‘Coo-ees’ realise it…”. [5]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Sergeant-Major Lee was a recruiting campaigner for the State Recruiting Committee on the ‘Wallabies’ and ‘North Coaster’ recruiting marches in December 1915 and January 1916.[6]

He applied for a commission in the Australian Imperial Forces on 10th July 1916, after completing a course at the Officer Training School at Duntroon on 20th June 1916.

He was appointed 2nd Lieutenant, and was posted to the 17th Reinforcements for the 24th Battalion on 25th July 1916.

On his embarkation roll his rank was 2nd Lieutenant, and his address at time of enrolment was Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, J. Sanders, Oliver Ford, Conrett, Durham, England.

2nd Lieutenant Lee departed Sydney on the HMAT A8 Argyllshire on 31st October 1916 with the 17th reinforcements for the 24th Battalion, bound for England.  He disembarked at Devonport on 10th January 1917.

He was taken on strength of 24th Battalion in France on 23rd March 1917.

He was transferred to the 21st Battalion in France on 2nd April 1917.

He wrote in a letter dated 15th April 1917 to the editor of the Gilgandra Weekly:

“… when I joined the battalion (21st) about two months ago they had had a fair innings for a time and were due for a spell. Nevertheless, was able to join in the trot on the heels of the Hun through Bapaume and villages near by. Began to think by the rate Fritz was falling back that we had started on that long last route march to Berlin, only it was a little bit different to that good old Western trail from Gilgandra to the sea…”.[7]

He was promoted to Lieutenant on 17th May 1917.

Lieutenant Lee attended the General Headquarters Gun School from 3rd to 8th September 1917.

He went on leave to England on 20th October 1917, and returned from leave on 3rd November 1917.

Lieutenant Lee injured his knee on 23rd November 1917, whilst the Battalion was training undertaking a football match at Locre, Belgium.

On 25th November he was admitted to the 14th General Hospital at Boulogne in France.

On 30th November 1917 Lieutenant Lee was evacuated to England on H.S. St. David, and admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital with a dislocation of his right knee.

On 12th March 1918 he began his return to Australia on the troopship Kenilworth Castle.

He arrived in Sydney on the HMAT Kanowna on 24th May 1918.

His appointment was terminated on 22nd June 1918.

[1] ‘Our soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 26 October 1915, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601552

[2] ‘Sergt-Major J. R. Lee’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 19 November 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108047436

[3] ‘Personal’, Spectator and Methodist Chronicle, 19 November 1915, p. 1618, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154174538

[4] ‘The Gilgandra March’, The Methodist, 20 November 1915, p. 7, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article155442595

[5] ‘The “Coo-ees” arrival in Dubbo’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 15 October 1915, p. 5, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601264

[6] ‘Route Marches’, The Sun, 26 November 1915, p. 8,  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221913106 ; ‘The Marches. Wallabies start’, The Sydney Morning Herald, 9 December 1915, p. 10, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15630157 ; ‘The Federal Elections’, Dungog Chronicle : Durham and Gloucester Advertiser,  28 November 1918, p. 7, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article134142941

[7] ‘Lieutenant J. R. Lee’, Gilgandra Weekly,  22 June 1917, p. 22, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108453939

 

Peter WILSON

Peter WILSON

Peter Wilson. Photograph courtesy of Gilgandra Museum and Historical Society.

Peter Wilson. Photograph courtesy of Gilgandra Museum and Historical Society.

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2404), Peter Wilson was born at Nyngan, N.S.W. He gave his age as 21 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 ½ inches tall, weight 12 stone 7 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.

He completed his medical at Gilgandra on 7th October 1915, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Gilgandra on 9th October 1915. He claimed he had no previous military service.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went Menangle Light Horse Camp as reinforcement for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

Private Wilson received a wristlet watch at a welcome home function held for some of the Coo-ees home on leave at Gilgandra at the end of December 1915. According to the speaker, Mr Garling, said Private Wilson ‘was very keen to do his duty for his country’, and ‘had made several attempts to enlist but had been rejected. However, he underwent a course of physical training, which improved his constitution and physique to such an extent that the next time he presented himself he was accepted’.[1]

On his embarkation roll his address as time of enrolment was Myrtle Street, Gilgandra, and his next of kin is listed as his sister, Miss Christiana Wilson, Miller’s Point, Sydney, N.S.W.

Trooper Wilson departed Sydney on the HMAT Palermo A56 on 18th April 1916, with the 16th Reinforcements for the 7th Light Horse Regiment.

After arriving in Egypt he was taken on strength by the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-el Kebir on 10th June 1916.

On 10th July 1916 he was transferred to the 1st Field Squadron Engineers.

On 19th July 1916 he was admitted to the Scottish Horse Field Ambulance, then was admitted to the 31st General Hospital at Port Said in Egypt with a condition not yet diagnosed on 20th July 1916. On 25th July he was transported by hospital train to Cairo, and was admitted to the 3rd Australian General Hospital at Abbassia with Pyrexia. He was discharged and returned to duly on 27th July 1916.

Private Wilson served with the 1st Field Squadron Engineers during the campaigns in Gaza and Palestine.

On 29th October 1917 he went to hospital sick and reverted to Sapper. On 31st October 1917 he was admitted to the 43rd Stationary Hospital with Cellulitis hand. On 10th January 1918 he was sent by hospital train, and admitted to the 24th Stationary Hospital at Kantara. On 11th January 1918 he was admitted to the 31st General Hospital at Port Said. On 27th January 1918 he was admitted to 14 Australian General Hospital at Port Said. On 2nd February 1918 he was sent to a Rest Camp at Port Said.

On 13th February 1918 he left the Rest Camp, and joined the Engineer Training Unit at Moascar.

On 27th February 1918 he was attached to D Troop IFSE for duty in the field.

His record of service notes that on 26th April 1918 he received superficial abrasions to his arms and hands and hip when he was thrown from a pontoon wagon at Jerusalem.

On 28th April 1918 he was admitted to the 66th Casualty Clearing Station at Jerusalem with Diarrhoea. He was transferred to the 75th Casualty Clearing Station on 30th April 1918. On 2nd May 1918 he was admitted to the 47th Stationary Hospital at Gaza. On 6th May 1918 he was transferred to 24 Stationary Hospital at Kantara. On 8th May 1918 he was transferred to 1st Australian General Hospital at Port Said in Egypt with Contused Hands. On 11th May 1918 he was sent to a Rest Camp at Port Said. On 22nd May 1918 he was sent to a Rest Camp at Moascar. On 31st May 1918 he was admitted to 2 Australian Stationary Hospital sick, and was discharged on 3rd September 1918 to a Rest Camp at Port Said.

He marched out to the Engineers Training Unit at Moascar on 18th September 1918.

On 28th September 1918 he was sent to 1st Field Squadron Engineers, and was taken on strength in the field on 1st October 1918. On 1st October 1918 he was made Driver.

On 19th June 1919 he was temporarily attached to AIF Headquarters at Kantara as a Driver.

Driver Wilson commenced his return to Australia on 3rd July 1919 aboard the H.T. Malta at Kantara.

He was discharged termination of period of enlistment on 25th September 1919.

[1] [No title], Gilgandra Weekly, 7 January 1916, p. 12, http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/119922632

 

 

Francis Noel WHITE

Francis Noel WHITE

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2395), Francis Noel White was born at Canterbury, Kent, in England. He gave his age as 35 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as wheelwright.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 ½ inches tall, weight 12 stone 7 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Anglican.

He completed his medical at Gilgandra on 7th October 1915, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Gilgandra on 9th October 1915. He claimed to have had 2 years and 3 days previous military service with the Royal East Kent Mounted Rifles. He also stated he had been rejected once before as unfit for His Majesty’s Service with a “hit knee”.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Menangle Light Horse Camp as reinforcement for the 6th Light Horse Regiment.

Francis Noel White was reported in The Bathurst Times as having been charged at Bathurst Police Court with ‘having travelled between Sydney and Bathurst without a ticket on the night of February 5’ 1916, and also ‘having attempted to travel on the return journey’ without a ticket, and was described as ‘a member of the Sixth Light Horse, and a rather good-looking Englishman of cultured speech’, who was ‘fortunate enough to be remembered favorably by Captain Hitchen’, and that ‘had not Captain Hitchen came to his rescue’, White ‘would in all probability be now spending two days in the shamed seclusion of the Bathurst Gaol’, instead of back in camp at Liverpool. White said in court that he was on final leave, and that he sailed on Friday. White also said that ‘he was from England originally’, and had been ‘working on stations up to the time’ he joined the Coo-ees. Captain Hitchen ‘informed the Bench that White had come all the way with the “Coo-ees” as a transport driver’, and that White had been in his ‘employ for a few weeks before the commencement of the march’, and that he ‘had found him a man of good character at all times, and one who had conducted himself well right through the piece’, and offered to pay White’s fare.[1]

An initial regimental number of 2254 is crossed out on his service record, and ‘16th REINFTS 6th L.H.’ stamped over 15th Reinforcements 6th Regiment, A.L.H., which had initially been recorded for his unit, so it appears this episode may have held up his embarkation overseas.

On his embarkation roll his address as time of enrolment was not recorded, and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs Merser, c/o Mrs Bosworth, “Linton”, College Lane, East Grimstead, Sussex, England.

Trooper White departed Sydney on the HMAT Hymttus 1 on 3rdof May 1916, as 16th Reinforcements for the 6th Light Horse Regiment.

After arriving in Egypt he was taken on strength by the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Tel-el Kebir on 27th June 1916.

On 8th September 1916 he was temporarily attached to Military Police Headquarters, at Moascar.

On 27th September 1916 a Field General Court Marshal was held at Moascar, where Private White charged with drunkenness when on active service on 20th September 1916, and he was sentenced to 21 days Field Punishment Number 2.

On 1st October 1916 he was admitted to the 24th Stationary Hospital, with Paraphimosis.

He rejoined Police Headquarters from Hospital on 14th October 1916.

On 18th October 1916 he rejoined the 6th Light Horse Regiment.

On 16th November 1916 Trooper White was transferred to the Imperial Camel Corps at Abbassia. On 19th November 1916 he was taken on strength of 3rd Company, Imperial Camel Corps.

Trooper White served with the Imperial Camel Corps in El-Mustagidda and El-Arish in Egypt until 5th February 1917, when after jumping off a camel he aggravated an old injury to his right knee where he had been ‘kicked by a horse 11 years ago’ , resulting in him being hospitalised.  He was taken by hospital train and admitted to the 24th Stationary Hospital with Synovitis knee on 9th February 1917.

On 12th February 1917 he was admitted to the No. 14 Australian General Hospital at Abbassia.

On 8th March 1917 Trooper White embarked from Suez, Egypt, aboard the HMAT Willochra bound for Australia, with Arthritis in the right knee.

He arrived at Melbourne on 25th April 1917. He was discharged medically unfit in Sydney on 25th May 1917.

[1] ‘A Coo-ee charged at Police Court : Captain Hitchen to the rescue’, The Bathurst Times, 8 February 1916, p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109940688

 

 

Andrew James MCGREGOR

Andrew James MCGREGOR

Andrew James McGregor (Daily Telegraph 22/9/1916)

Andrew James McGregor (Daily Telegraph 22/9/1916)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4855), Andrew James McGregor was born at Sydney, N.S.W. He gave his age as 34 years and 2 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as baker. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 8 stone 9 lbs, with a dark complexion, dark blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Anglican. He claimed that he had 10 years’ experience in the Colonial Forces. He as attested by Captain Nicholas at Gilgandra on the 9th October, 1915, after completing his medical at Gilgandra on 7th October 1915.

He sold his I.X.L. Bakery business in Gilgandra before joining the Coo-ee March at Gilgandra.[1]

His younger brother Arthur Ernest McGregor also joined the Coo-ee March, being attested, and completing his medical examination, when the Coo-ees were at Springwood.

After completing the Coo-ee March Andrew James McGregor went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 39 Fotheringham Street, Marrickville, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs. A. [Alice] McGregor, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916, Private McGregor, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT Star of England, arriving in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel El Kebir, Egypt.

On 4th June 1916 Private McGregor, along with several other Coo-ees, left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France, and arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private McGregor served on the Western Front with the 4th Pioneer Battalion until the end of 1916, when on 22nd December 1916 he transferred to the 2nd Australian Field Bakery.

Private McGregor was granted 10 days leave to the United Kingdom on 29th June 1917.

On the 24th June 1918 Private McGregor was admitted to hospital with Sclerosis Spinal Cord. He was evacuated to hospital in England on 30th June 1918.

He began his return to Australia aboard the Transport HT Gaika on the 8th November 1918, arriving in Australian on the 29th December 1918.

Private McGregor was discharged on 4th September 1920.

[1] ‘Advertising’, Gilgandra Weekly, 22 October 1915, p.7, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119923863