Tag Archives: Cobar recruits

Andrew George LENNOX

Andrew George LENNOX

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4824),  Andrew George Lennox was born at Bourke, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 19 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as railway porter.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 185 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and medium brown hair.  His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

A send-off was held on Thursday 28th October 1915 at the Court House Hotel in Cobar for Andrew Lennox, Norman Francisco, and brothers Walter and Robert Mitchell, and they were then cheered by many friends when they left Cobar by train on Saturday 30th October 1915 to join the A.I.F.[2]

All four of them completed their medical examinations, and were attested, at Dubbo on Monday 2nd November 1915, (the day the Coo-ees were at Lithgow).

Andrew Lennox then traveled by train with these three other Cobar men to catch up with the Coo-ees.  They were waiting to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees arrived at Mt. Victoria three days later, on Thursday 4th November 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Lennox went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Private Lennox and fellow Coo-ee Private Francisco while home on leave were given a farewell at the Star Hotel in Cobar on Saturday, 1st January 1916.[4]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Marshall Street, Cobar, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his father, A. Lennox, at the same address.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Lennox, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel El Kebir, Egypt.

On 4th June 1916 Private Lennox left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

He served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France and Belgium.

On 1st September 1918 Private Lennox went on leave to England.

He returned to the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 17th September 1918, and was transferred to the 4th Machine Gun Battalion in France.

On 16th November 1918 Private Lennox was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance sick. He was moved back to the 50th Casualty Clearing Station on 17th November 1918.

On 22nd November 1918 he was placed aboard the 2nd Ambulance Train and moved to the 2nd Convalescent Depot, arriving on 23rd November 1918. On 24th November 1918 he was transferred to the 39th General Hospital at Le Harve, France, where he was admitted on 25th November 1918.

On 26th December 1918 Private Lennox was placed aboard a Hospital Ship for evacuation to England.  He was admitted to the Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England, on 27th December 1918.

On 10th May 1919 he was discharged from hospital, and sent to the Convalescent Training Depot at Parkhouse, England.

On 12th May 1919 Private Lennox was sent back to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford sick.

He was discharged from hospital on 21st July 1919, and sent to the No. 2 Group at Sutton Veny, England.

On 22nd August 1919 Private Lennox left England on the H.T.t Anchises bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 13th October 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 5th December 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, LENNOX ANDREW GEORGE

[2] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 30 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136723099

[3] Summary’, Western Age, 6 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136724708

[4] Valedictory. (1916, January 4). Western Age (Dubbo, NSW : 1914 – 1932), p. 2. Retrieved February 18, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136725949

[5] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Andrew George Lennox, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

Norman Hamond FRANCISCO

Norman Hamond FRANCISCO

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4775),  Norman Hamond Francisco was born at Cobar, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 24 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as baker.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 1 ½ inches tall, weight 162 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and light brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

A send-off was held on Thursday 28th October 1915 at the Court House Hotel in Cobar for Norman Francisco, brothers Walter and Robert Mitchell, and Andrew Lennox, and they were then cheered by many friends when they left Cobar by train on Saturday 30th October 1915 to join the A.I.F.[2]

All four of them completed their medical examinations, and were attested, at Dubbo on Monday 2nd November 1915, (the day the Coo-ees were at Lithgow).

Norman Francisco then traveled by train with these three other Cobar men to catch up with the Coo-ees.  They were waiting to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees arrived at Mt. Victoria three days later, on Thursday 4th November 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Francisco went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 20th December 1915 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp from 3rd to 19th December 1915. He was fined 17 days pay.

Private Francisco and fellow Coo-ee Private Lennox while home on leave were given a farewell at the Star Hotel in Cobar on Saturday, 1st January 1916.[4]

On 4th February 1916 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from the Liverpool Camp on 1st February 1916. He was fined 1 days pay.

On 16th February 1916 he was charged with being absent from night piquet. He was fined 2 days pay.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Becker Street, Cobar, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his father, A. [Alfred] Francisco, at the same address.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Private Francisco, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On the 16th of April 1916 he transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel El Kebir, Egypt.

On the 4th of June 1916 Private Francisco left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived  at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 31st October 1916 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from 0830 on 29th October 1916 till 0900 on 29th October 1916. He was fined 4 days pay.

On 5th November 1916 Private Francisco was injured playing in a football match. He was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance. On 7th November 1916 he was admitted to the 1st New Zealand Stationary Hospital at Amiens, France, with a sprained ankle. On 9th November 1916 he was placed aboard the 9th Ambulance Train and sent to the 11th Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France, where he was admitted on 10th November 1916 with a fracture to the 5th metarasal bone in his right foot.

On 12th November 1916 Private Francisco was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Formosa bound for England. He was admitted to the 1st Southern General Hospital at Birmingham, England, on 13th November 1916, with a fractured toe.

Private Francisco was discharged from hospital on 19th February 1917, and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England on 6th March 1917.

On 24th March 1917 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from 3.30 pm on 6th March 1917 till 8.45 am on 23rd March 1917. He was awarded 10 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 28 days pay.

On 21st June 1917 Private Francisco was charged with neglecting to obey routine orders by being in Tidworth after hours on 19th June 1917 without a pass, using obscene language, and drunkenness. He was awarded 14 days detention.

On 21st August 1917 Private Francisco marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 23rd September 1917 he was appointed Acting Lance Corporal at Fovant, England, while attending school.

On 20th October 1917 Private Francisco was sent to the Sutton Veny Military Hospital sick with Influenza.  He revered to the rank of Private on being admitted to hospital.  He was discharged on 30th October 1917.

On 22nd February 1918 Private Francisco was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 19th February 1918 till apprehended by the Military Police at 1815 on 20th February 1918. He was awarded 1 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 3 days pay.

On 7th April 1918 Private Francisco departed Southampton, England, bound for France.  He marched into the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Le Havre on 8th April 1918.

On 19th April 1918 he rejoined the 4th Pioneer Battalion in France.

On 22nd May 1918 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was resting  in billets around the village of Bussy, France, when it was bombed by enemy aircraft.[6]  One man was killed and 6 were wounded. Private Francisco was one of those wounded, receiving a bomb wound to his right leg. He was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance. On 23rd May 1918 he was moved back to the 5th Casualty Clearing Station. On 27th May 1918 he was placed aboard the 10th Ambulance Train, being admitted to the 47th General Hospital later that day. He was discharged on 5th June 1918, and sent to the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

He rejoined the 4th Pioneer Battalion on the 19th of June 1918.

On 13th March 1919 Private Francisco departed France bound for England to commence his return to Australia. He arrived at Weymouth, England, on 14th March 1919 and marched into the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 1st May 1919 Private Francisco commenced his return to Australia aboard the Transport China.

He arrived in Australia on 11th June 1919.

Private Francisco was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 26th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, FRANCISCO N H

[2] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 30 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136723099

[3] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 6 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136724708

[4] Valedictory. (1916, January 4). Western Age (Dubbo, NSW : 1914 – 1932), p. 2. Retrieved February 18, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136725949

[5] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Norman Hammond [sic] Francisco, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[6] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War – AWM4 Subclass 14/16 – 4th Australian Pioneer Battalion, May 1918.

Walter James MITCHELL

Walter James MITCHELL

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4842),  Walter James Mitchell was born at Cobar, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 37 years and 5 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as Contractor.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 147 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and light brown hair.  His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed to have had no previous military service.

A send-off was held on Thursday 28th October 1915 at the Court House Hotel in Cobar for Walter and his brother Robert Mitchell, Norman Franciso, and Andrew Lennox, and they were then cheered by many friends when they left Cobar by train on 30th October 1915 to join the A.I.F.[2]

Walter Mitchell completed his medical examination, and was attested, at Dubbo on 2nd November 1915, (the day the Coo-ees were at Lithgow).

Walter and his brother Robert Mitchell, Andrew Lennox, and Norman Francisco then travelled to catch up with the Coo-ees, and  were waiting to join the Coo-ee March when the Coo-ees arrived at Mt. Victoria two days later, on 4th November 1915.[3]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Cobar, N.S.W., and his next of kin was listed as his wife, Mrs H. G. [Henrietta] Mitchell, C/o W. Mitchell, Cobar, N.S.W.  His rank was listed as Acting Corporal.[4]

A farewell was held at the Masonic Hall in Cobar at the Masonic Hall on Friday 3rd March 1916 to bid farewell to Corporal Walter Mitchell, and his brother Private Bob Mitchell, and Private Fred Duncan. The Western Age reported that  ‘Corporal Walter Mitchell, on rising to respond on behalf of himself and his comrades, was loudly cheered’, and in a ‘very affected speech he said words failed to thank to people of Cobar for all the kind remarks and their nice presents’, and that they would ‘cherish them wherever it was their lot to be sent’, and that it was a ‘great wrench for him to go, but he realised duty had to be done, and he was going to do his little bit’.[5]

On 8th March 1916 Acting Corporal Mitchell, along with his brother, and many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Tel-el-Kebir, and taken on strength of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade, with the rank of Gunner.

On 22nd May 1916 Gunner Mitchell was transferred to the 37th Battery.

On 5th June 1916 Gunner Mitchell left Alexandria aboard the HMT Oriana bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 13th June 1916.

On 24th October 1916 Gunner Mitchell was taken on the strength of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade.

On 25th October 1916 Gunner Mitchell was appointed as a Temporary Bombardier.

On 9th March 1917 Temporary Bombardier Mitchell was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance sick. On 12th March 1917 he was moved back to a Casualty Clearing Station, and reverted to the rank of Gunner.

On 19th April 1917 he was placed aboard the 20th Ambulance Train, and evacuated to the 14th Stationary Hospital at Boulogne, France.

On 22nd April 1917 Gunner Mitchell was placed aboard Hospital Ship Jan Breydel for evacuation to England, with meningitis.

On 23rd April he was admitted to the Addington Park War Hospital outside London, England.

On 18th May 1917 Gunner Mitchell was transferred to the Royal Herbert Hospital at Woolwich, England.

On 8th August 1917 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield Park, England.

Gunner Mitchell was discharged on the 18th of August 1917, and sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 27th September 1917 Gunner Mitchell departed England aboard the H.T.  Suevic bound for Australia, for medical discharge with Myalgia debility after C. S. Fever.

He arrived in Australia on 20th November 1917.

Private Mitchell was welcomed home and presented with a silver cup by the people of Cobar, and the Red Cross Association, at the Masonic Hall in Cobar on 5th December 1917.[6]

Private Mitchell was discharged medically unfit on 31st January 1918.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, MITCHELL WALTER JAMES

[2] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 30 October 1915, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136723099

[3] ‘Summary’, Western Age, 6 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved April 4, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136724708

[4] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Rolls, Walter James Mitchell, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[5] ‘Cobar’s Farewell’, Western Age (Dubbo, NSW : 1914 – 1932), 10 March 1916, p. 2. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136721446

[6] ‘Cobar Soldiers’ Red Cross Association’,Western Age, 7 December 1917, p. 3. Retrieved August 5, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136909226

 

William Henry PEPPERNELL

William Henry PEPPERNELL

Per his military service record (regimental no. 541), William Henry Peppernell was born at Cowra, N.S.W. He gave his age as 28 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as railway ganger. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 152 lbs., with a ruddy complexion, brown eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed 12 months previous military experience in the Mullion Creek Rifle Club.

‘W. Peppernal (ganger)’ was named in the Western Age on 3rd November 1915 as one of ‘three young men, railway employees’, that enlisted at the conclusion of a recruitment meeting held in Canbelego [which is near Cobar], at which Private Fern, M.L.A. spoke, that would ‘leave Canbelego by train on Tuesday, and join the Coo-ees beyond Bathurst’.[1]

His postal address on his initial Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form dated 30th October 1915 was ‘Canbelego’, and he undertook a Preliminary medical examination at Canbelego on the same date.

He was attested by Captain Eade on 7th November 1915 at Lawson (when the Coo-ees were at Lawson), and completed his medical on 13th November at Liverpool.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 19th February 1916 he transferred to B Company in the 36th Battalion, to join his two brothers Frederick and Henry who had enlisted in January 1916.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Kerr’s Creek, Orange, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs Annie Peppernell, at the same address.

On 13th May 1916 Private Peppernell (along with his two brothers) departed Sydney on the HMAT Beltana A72, arriving in Devonport, England, on the 9th July 1916.

After spending the next four months in England with the 36th Battalion in training, Private Peppernell on 22nd November 1916 departed from Southampton, England, bound for France.

Private Peppernell was with the 36th Battalion when it moved into the trenches on the Western Front in early December 1916.

His brother Private Frederick Peppernell (regimental no. 535), was with him in the 36th Battalion during the Battle of Messines in Belgium, when his brother was killed in action on 7th June 1917. The Australian Red Cross Society Wounded and Missing Enquiry Bureau Files record Private W.H. Peppernell’s statement made on 6th November 1917: ‘My brother F. Peppernell went out with me in a carrying party for the Messines advance. I saw him last about 30 yards in front of me. The enemy was sniping us and I told him to take cover. He got into a shell hole and I did not see him again. I enquired at the Clearing Station by could hear nothing of him. I have heard since from home in Australia that he has been killed’.[2]

On the 12th of October 1917 the 36th Battalion was involved in an unsuccessful attack to capture Passchendaele Ridge near the village of Passchendaele (First Battle for Passchendaele) during the ongoing Third Battle of Ypres in Belgium. During this attack Private Peppernell was wounded in action, receiving a gunshot wound to his right knee, and he was admitted to the 3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Station.

He was evacuated to England on Hospital Ship Carisbrooke Castle on 20th October 1917, and was admitted to Voluntary Aid Detachment Hospital Cheltenham Area with a gun shot wound to right thigh slight on 21st October 1917.

Private Peppernell was given leave from 21st November 1917 to 5th December 1917, then reported to No. 1 Command Depot.

On 3rd January 1918 Private Peppernell departed Southampton to France. On 10th January 1918 he rejoined the 36th Battalion in Belgium.

On 12th March 1918 Private Peppernell was promoted to Lance Corporal.

Lance Corporal Peppernell was recommended (but not awarded) a Military Medal for his actions on 4th April 1918, while the 36th Battalion helped to defeat a major attack by the Germans on Villers-Bretonneux in France. The recommendation reads:

William Henry PEPPERNELL. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Previous to the launching of a counter-attack by his Battalion on the 4th April 1918, and when the enemy was advancing in force, L/Cpl. PEPPERNELL went forward under heavy fire and located the enemy, affording valuable information to his Company Commander which enabled him to avoid heavy casualties. Decoration recommended MM.[3]

The 36th Battalion was disbanded on 30th April 1918 to reinforce other units, and Lance Corporal Peppernell was transferred to the 33rd Battalion in France.

On 4th June 1918, Lance Corporal Peppernell was wounded in action for a second time, with a gun shot wound to the left arm, while the 33rd Battalion was in in the vicinity of Villers-Bretonneux in France.

He was taken first to the 10th Australian Field Ambulance, then to the 5th Casualty Clearing Station. He was admitted to the 12th General Hospital in Rouen on 8th April 1918.   On 10th June 1918 he was evacuated to England.

On 11th June 1918 Lance Corporal Peppenell was admitted to Horton County of London War Hospital in England with gun shot to the left arm, severe.

On 26th June 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Auxiliary Hospital in Dartford.

On 1st July 1918 he was discharged to No. 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott.

On 26th August 1918 Lance Corporal Peppenell was admitted to 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital in Bulford. He was discharged to Convalescent Training Depot, Parkhouse, on 28th August 1918.

On 11th October 1918 he was transferred to No. 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny.

Lance Corporal Peppernell commenced his return to Australia on the HMAT Orsova on 8th January 1919. He arrived in Australia on 3rd March 1919.

The Leader reported that Lance Corporal Peppernell was welcomed at Kerr’s Creek Railway Station on 10th March 1919 by a large number of residents, and a welcome home function was held that Friday evening, where he was presented with a medal which was inscribed with his name and battalion colours.[4]

He was discharged medically unfit on 10th April 1919.

 

[1] ‘Canbelego News’,Western Age, 3 November 1915, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136727753

[2] 535 Frederick Peppernell, Red Cross Wounded and Missing Enquiry Bureau Files, 1914-1918 War 1DRL/0428, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1499936/

[3] Australian War Memorial, Honours and Awards: William Henry Peppernell, Lance Corporal, 36th Australian Infantry Battalion, First World War, 1914-1918, Recommendation: Military Medal, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1622124/

[4] ‘Kerr’s Creek welcome’, Leader, 17 March 1919, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117856950 ; ‘Kerr’s Creek’, Leader, 7 April 1919, p. 5, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117857839

 

 

 

Henry MOSS

Henry MOSS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2221), Henry Moss was born at Mossgiel, N.S.W. He gave his age as 24 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as shearer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 152 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He joined the Coo-ee March at Dubbo. He undertook a preliminary medical at Cobar on 11th October 1915, giving his postal address on this document as “Cobar”. He completed his medical on the 13th October 1915 at Dubbo, and was attested on the 13th October 1915 at Dubbo. He claimed to have no previous military service.

After completing the remainder of the march he went to Liverpool Camp. He was appointed as 15th reinforcement for the 1st Light Horse Regiment at Liverpool on 7th February 1916.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Bulli, South Coast, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Moss, Bulli, South Coast, N.S.W.

Private Moss departed Sydney on the HMAT A25 Armadale on the 21st March 1916. He arrived in Egypt on the 24th April 1916.

On the 18th May 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Serapeum.

On the 4th June 1916 he embarked on the transport Scotian at Alexandria to join the British Expeditionary Force in France. He disembarked in Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Moss was appointed Lance Corporal in the field on 17th November 1916.

On the 4th June 1916 L/Corporal Moss was transferred to the 45th Battalion.

L/Corporal Moss was wounded in action on 7th June 1917, when he received gunshot wounds to his left arm compound fracture to his humerus, and was taken to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station. On the 8th June he was moved to the 7th General Hospital at St Omer. On the 14th August he was admitted to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital in Dartmouth in England.

On 29th August 1917 L/Corporal Moss was discharged from hospital and sent to No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth.

L/Corporal Moss departed England on 26th September 1917 on the HMAT Borda to return to Australia, and disembarked in Sydney on 25th November 1917.

He was discharged medically unfit on 2nd March 1918.