Tag Archives: Lithgow recruits

Ernest Henry KING

Ernest Henry KING

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4821), George Davidson was born at Bathurst, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 29 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as blacksmith.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed to have had 3 years military service in B Company of the 3rd Infantry Regiment at Bathurst.

Captain A. C. Eade stated that ‘Private King joined the Coo-ees at Wallerawang’ in a farewell given for him and another soldier at the Soldiers’ Monument in Bathurst on 6th January 1916.[2] The ‘Date of joining’ on the HMAT Star of England A15 embarkation roll for Private Ernest Henry King was recorded as 31st October 1915.[3]  On this date the Coo-ees had a rest day at Wallerawang, after having held a recruiting meeting there the night before.

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Captain Eade, at Lithgow, on 2nd November 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The Lithgow Mercury reported that ‘Ern King’, along with fellow Coo-ee George Davidson, who had both joined the Coo-ees from Cullen Bullen, ‘were farewelled at a smoke concert in the Cullen Hall’ in early January 1916, and Private King was presented with ‘a silver cigarette case, holder, and pouch’.[4]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 98 Russell Street, Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs. M. A. [Mary Ann] King, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private King, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private King on was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 19th April 1916 Private King was sent to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance at Serapaum, Egypt, suffering from Mumps. On 25th April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Casualty Clearing Station at Serapaum. He was discharged on 4th May 1916 and re-joined the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On 4th June 1916 Private King left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 9th August 1917 Private King went on leave in France until 19th August 1917.

On 8th September 1917 Private King was detached to the 14th Australian Army Service Company to paint wagons. He returned to the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 17th September 1917.

On 1st December 1917 Private King was promoted to Lance Corporal.

On 27th September 1918 Lance Corporal King was appointed Driver, and went on leave to England. He returned to the 4th Pioneer Battalion on 13th October 1918.

On the 7th of April 1919 Lance Corporal King departed Le Harve, France, bound for England. He arrived at Southampton, England on 9th April 1919.

On 12th May 1919 Lance Corporal King departed England on the HT Port Napier bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 5th July 1919.  He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 27th August 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, KING E H

[2] ‘Privates Jack Rigby and E. King’, National Advocate, 7 January 1916, p. 5. Retrieved June 18, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158051490

[3] Australia War Memorial. ‘First World War Embarkation Rolls, Ernest Henry King’, HMAT Star of England A15, https://oldsite.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1830975/

[4] ‘Cullen Bullen Recruiting’, Lithgow Mercury, 7 January 1916, p. 3. Retrieved June 18, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218730509

George DAVIDSON

George DAVIDSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4760), George Davidson was born at Morpeth, Northumberland, England.[1]  He gave his age as 44 years and 2 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 5 inches tall, with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and grey brown hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had no previous military experience.

He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Captain A. C. Eade, at Lithgow, on 2nd November 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The Lithgow Mercury reported that ‘Geordie Davidson’ along with fellow Coo-ee ‘Ern King’, who had both joined the Coo-ees from Cullen Bullen, ‘were farewelled at a smoke concert in the Cullen Hall’ in early January 1916, and Private Davidson was ‘presented with a pipe and tobacco pouch’.[2]

Private G. Davidson was also given a send off ‘by his many friends’ at ‘the house of Mr. F. Maddy’ in Bathurst [who was listed as his next of kin on his Attestation Paper] in early January 1916, where he was ‘presented with a wristlet watch and also a pocket bible from his friends’.[3]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Cullen Bullen, Mudgee Line, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his friend, F. [Fred] Muddy [i.e. Maddy], 265 Russell Street, Bathurst, N.S.W.

The ‘Date of joining’ on the HMAT Star of England A15 embarkation roll for both Private George Davidson and Private Ernest Henry King was recorded as 31st October 1915.[4]  The Coo-ees arrived at Wallerawang and held a recruiting meeting there on 30th October 1915.  According to Mr H. T. Blacket who accompanied the Coo-ees in his motor car, seven men presented themselves to join the Coo-ees that evening.[5]  The Coo-ees had a rest day at Wallerawang on 31st October 1915, before marching on to Lithgow on 1st November 1915.  Both George Davidson and Ernest Henry King completed their medical examinations, and were attested by Captain Eade, at Lithgow on 2nd November 1915.  Captain Eade stated that ‘Private King joined the Coo-ees at Wallerawang’ in an article published in the National Advocate on 7th January 1916.  So it appears possible that George Davidson may also have been present at the recruiting meeting held at Wallerawang on the evening of 30th October 1915.[6]

On 8th March 1916 Private Davidson, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.  He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Davidson was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt.

On 4th June 1916 Private Davidson left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 29th August 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was conducting maintenance on trenches in the vicinity of Mouquet Farm, France, when Private Davidson was struck by a the blast of a high explosive shell in the left arm.

On 31st August 1916 Private Davidson was admitted to the 3rd Canadian Field Ambulance with a fracture of left scapula [shoulder blade].

His movements for the next year while he recovered from his wounds are not clear on his service record.

On 27th August 1917 he was transferred to England from the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Havre, France.

He arrived at Weymouth, England, on 29th August 1917, where he marched into the No. 2 Command Depot, with classification “C1” [fit for home service only].

On 26th September 1917 Private Davidson departed England bound for Australia aboard the HMAT Borda for medical discharge, with a deformity to the left elbow.

Private Davidson arrived at Sydney on 25th November 1917.  He was discharged medically unfit on 27th December 1917.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, DAVIDSON G

[2] ‘Cullen Bullen Recruiting’, Lithgow Mercury, 7 January 1916, p. 3. Retrieved June 18, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218730509

[3] ‘Personal’, National Advocate, 7 January 1916, p. 5. Retrieved June 18, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158051548

[4] Australia War Memorial. ‘First World War Embarkation Rolls, George Davidson’, HMAT Star of England A15, https://oldsite.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1834299/

[5] ‘The Great Route March … Yetholme to Wallerawang’, The Farmer and Settler, 2 November 1915, p. 3. Retrieved June 19, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116674770

[6] ‘Privates Jack Rigby and E. King’, National Advocate, 7 January 1916, p. 5. Retrieved June 18, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158051490

 

William Arthur BURTON

William Arthur BURTON

Per his military service record (Depot), William Arthur Burton was born at Marrickville, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 7 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 5 ½ inches tall, weight 129 lbs, with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was Church of England.  His next of kin on his Attestation paper was listed his mother, Mrs B. Burton, 68 Enmore Road, Marrickville N.S.W.

He signed his attestation paper with the date 31st October 1915, the day the Coo-ees rested at Wallerawang, before they marched to Lithgow on 1st November 1915.  He completed his medical examination, and was attested by Captain Eade, at Lithgow on 2nd November 1915.

He claimed to have one month ‘s previous military experience with the A.I.F. but was discharged with pneumonia.  However a separate earlier service record (regimental no. 2122) shows that he  completed a medical examination at Sydney on  22nd May 1915, and was attested at Liverpool on 30th May 1915, but was discharged after 15 days service with reason for discharge ‘own request – under age’ on 12th June 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp with the Coo-ee Detachment.

A letter in his service record written by his mother Mrs Barbara Burton requesting his discharge dated 17th November 1915 stated that: “My son has joined the Gilgandra contingent at Wallerawang, where he was working, without my consent as he is only seventeen (17) years of age last April. I object to him joining as he is one of my main supports and I am a widow. Trusting you will send him home”. [3]

On 22nd November 1915 Private Burton was charged with being absent without leave on 21st November 1915. He was fined one days pay.

Private Burton signed a Statutory Declaration on 23rd November 1915 stating that “I am only 17 years of age … having been born … on the thirteenth day of April … one thousand eight hundred and ninety eight”.[4]

He was discharged from Liverpool Camp parents request, being underage, on 25th November 1915.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, BURTON W A : Burton William Arthur : SERN DEPOT : POB Marrickville NSW : POE Lithgow NSW

[2] NAA: B2455, BURTON W A : Burton William Arthur : SERN DEPOT 2122 : POB Enmore NSW : POE Liverpool NSW

[3] NAA: B2455, BURTON W A : Burton William Arthur : SERN DEPOT : POB Marrickville NSW : POE Lithgow NSW, , letter to Colonel Kirkland, Commanding Officer, Liverpool Camp, from Mrs Barbara Burton, 17 November 1915

[4] NAA: B2455, BURTON W A : Burton William Arthur : SERN DEPOT : POB Marrickville NSW : POE Lithgow NSW, Statutory Declaration, William Arthur Burton, 23 November 1915.

 

William CAIRNS

William CAIRNS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4748), William Cairns was born at Strawberry Hills, Sydney, N.S.W. [1] He gave his age as 26 years and 5 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 3 ¼ inches tall, weight 131 lbs., with a medium complexion, brown eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed his medical examination on 2nd November 1915 at Lithgow (when the Coo-ees were at Lithgow), and was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Lithgow on 2nd November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 25th November 1915 Private Cairns was charged with being absent without leave.  He was fined one days pay.

On 22nd December 1915 Private Cairns was charged with being absent without leave for four days.  He was fined two shillings and forfeited four days pay.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Farr Street, Rockdale, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs. A. [Alice] Cairns, 31 Junction Road, North Sydney, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Cairns departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, and arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 24th May 1916 Private Cairns was admitted to the 2nd Australian Stationary Hospital at Tel-e-Kebir, suffering from Influenza.  On 26th of May 1916 he was sent to the Base Details Depot at Helopolis, Egypt.

On 2nd August 1916 Private Cairns was charged with being absent without leave from the 1700 Parade and absent from Piquet.  He was awarded seven days Field Punishment Number 2.

On 6th August 1916 Private Cairns left Alexandria aboard His Majesty’s Transport Megantic bound for England, arriving at Portsmouth later that month.  He then marched into the 4th Training Battalion.

On 22nd September 1916 Private Cairns left England bound for France.  On 24th September 1916 he marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

He was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion on 6th October 1916 when it was manning the front line in the St Eloi sector in Belgium.

On 17th October 1916 Private Cairns was sent to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance sick.  On 18th October 1916 he was sent to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance, then to the Division Rest Station.  On 25th October he was moved to the 1st Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France.  On 26th October 1916 he was admitted to the 18th General Hospital at Camiers, France.

On 23rd November 1916 he was transferred to the 51st General Hospital at Etaples, France.

On the 5th of December 1916 he was discharged and sent to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot also at Etaples, France.

On 8th December 1916 Private Cairns was charged with Drunkenness and being in possession of spirits on 6th December 1916. He was awarded 28 days Field Punishment Number One.

On 23rd December 1916 Private Cairns rejoined the 13th Battalion when it was training at Coisy, France.

On 28th January 1917 Private Cairns was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance with eye problems.  He was moved back to the Division Rest Station.

He rejoined the 13th Battalion on 2nd February 1917 when it was being relieved from the front line in the vicinity of Guedecourt, France.

On 26th February 1917 Private Cairns was charged with when on active service being in Amiens without a pass, and not complying with an order given by a Military Police officer.  He was fined seven days pay.

On 13th March 1917 Private Cairns was sent to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance suffering Influenza.  On 30th March 1917 he was transferred to the 5th General Hospital at Rouen, France, suffering Cystitis.

On 16th April 1917 Private Cairns was placed aboard the Hospital Ship St George at Rouen for evacuation to England.  On 17th April 1917 he was admitted to the Graylingwell War Hospital at Chichester, England, with Pyrexia.

On 4th May 1917 Private Cairns was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England.  He was discharged on 14th May 1917, and granted leave to report to the Training Battalion at Hurdcott, England, on 29th May 1917.

On 30th May 1917 Private Cairns was moved to the 3rd Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 30th June 1917 Private Cairns marched into the Overseas Training Brigade at Pernham Downs, England.

On 20th July 1917 Private Cairns was admitted sick to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England.  He was discharged on 24th July 1917, and sent to the Convalescent Training Depot.

On 6th September 1917 Private Cairns was transferred to the Number 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England.

On 18th October 1917 Private Cairns was charged with being absent without leave from 1400 on 2nd October 1917 till being apprehended by the Military Police at 1100 on 15th October 1917, and losing by neglect his pass.  He was awarded Field Punishment Number Two and fined 28 days pay.

On 23rd October 1917 Private Cairns marched into the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge Deverell, England.

On 3rd November 1917 Private Cairns was admitted to the Sutton Veny Hospital suffering Trachoma.  A Medical Report of an Invalid form dated 3rd November 1917 in his file recorded that the disability dated from 4th February 1917 at Fleurs, France, where ‘phosphorus from shells caused irritation of eyes which gradually became worse’.

On 9th November 1917 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 6th December 1917 Private Cairns was charged with being absent without leave from the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital from 2045 on 4th December 1917 till 8.45pm on 5th December 1917.  He was fined three days pay.

On 14th December 1917 Private Cairns was discharged from hospital and sent to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

Private Cairns left England on the H.M.A.T. Runic on 20th December 1917, for return to Australia, suffering TrachomaHe disembarked at Sydney on 14th February 1918.

Private Cairns was discharged Medically Unfit on 13th August 1918.

Note: William Cairns died the year after he returned to Australia, at the No 4 Australian General Hospital (Randwick Military Hospital), on 2nd April 1919.  He was buried at Gore Hill Cemetery at Gore Hill, Sydney.  His name is remembered on the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour.[2]

[1]  NAA: B2455, CAIRNS W

[2] Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour, William Cairns, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1677339/

 

 

Francis Albury HOLLAND

Francis Albury HOLLAND

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4800), Francis Albury Holland was born at Wyong, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 22 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 ½ inches tall, weight 141 lbs., with a medium complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had 4 months previous military service with the Australian Rifles.

He completed his medical examination on the 2nd November 1915 at Lithgow, and was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Lithgow on 2nd November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Alison Road, Wyong, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs. L. [Louisa] Holland, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Holland departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, arriving in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Holland left Alexandria aboard the Transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 8th  June 1916.

Private Holland served with the 45th Battalion in France until 27th July 1916, when he was admitted to the 1st New Zealand Stationary Hospital at Amiens, France, suffering from Epilepsy.

On 31st July 1916 he was transferred to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Rouen, France.

On 4th August 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Marama at Havre for evacuation to England.

He was admitted to the 2nd Birmingham War Hospital in England on 6th August 1916.

Private Holland was discharged on 13th September 1916, and sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 17th October 1916 Private Holland departed Portland, England, aboard the H.M.A.T. Ajana, bound for Australia.

On 20th November 1916 he was charged with Breaking Hospital at sea on 17th November 1916. He was awarded 24 hours detention.

Private Holland arrived in Australia in early December 1916, and was discharged medically unfit on 20th January 1917.

[1] NAA: B2455, HOLLAND F A 4800

Edward Montgomery SHEPPARD

Edward Montgomery SHEPPARD

Per his military service record (Depot), Edward Montgomery Sheppard was born at Gerogery, near Albury, N.S.W. He gave his age as 25 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as fettler. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 136 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and light brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed he had no previous military experience.

His initial Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form was addressed to the Recruiting officer at Wallerawang, and his postal address was Public School, Rydal, [where his father had been the School Teacher].

He was attested at Lithgow by Captain Eade on 2nd November 1915, when the Coo-ees were at Lithgow, and completed his medical on 2nd November 1915 at Lithgow.

The Lithgow Mercury reported on 5th November 1915 that “Ted” Sheppard had joined the Coo-ees at Lithgow. [1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

His service record shows he served with the 13th Battalion at Liverpool Camp from 11th November 1915 to 17th February 1916, when he was ‘posted as a deserter’.

At the end of March 1917 Edward Sheppard was notified by the Police to go back to the Military as he was never discharged from his previous enlistment.

He completed another Application to enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form on 25th April 1917, addressed to the Recruiting Officer at Lithgow.

A further attestation paper in his military service record showed a “Joined on” date of re-enlistment in the AIF of 7th May 1917, and that he had been working as a charger (furnace man) at G. & C. Hoskins Steel Foundry at Lithgow before this re-enlistment.

On his embarkation roll his address at the time of his subsequent enrolment was Lithgow, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, William Charles Sheppard, School Teacher, Belmore, N.S.W.

On 31st October 1917 Private Sheppard (regimental service no. 4710) departed Sydney on the HMAT A14 Euripides with the 13th reinforcements for the 1st Pioneer Battalion.

A certificate of medical examination, and attestation, were completed “At sea” on 11th November 1917, on the HMAT A14 Euripides.

He disembarked at Devonport in England on 26th December 1917, and was sent to the Pioneer Training Battalion at Sutton Veny.

Two days later, on 28th December 1917 he was admitted to hospital sick with scabies. He was discharged on 3rd January 1918.

On 10th January 1918 Private Sheppard was again sent to hospital suffering with scabies. He was discharged on 16th January 1918.

On 31st March 1918 Private Sheppard was sent to hospital again suffering with scabies. He was discharged on 4th April 1918.

On 29th April 1918 Private Sheppard was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 24th April 1918 till apprehended by the Military Police at 9.45 p.m. on 26th April 1918. He was awarded 2 days Field Punishment number 2 and fined 4 days pay.

On 14th August 1918 Private Sheppard was charged with being absent without leave from 9.30 a.m. on 11th August 1918 till reporting back at 6.30 a.m. on 12th August 1918. He was awarded 2 days Field Punishment Number 2 and fined 3 days pay.

On 28th October 1918 Private Sheppard was sent to hospital suffering conjunctivitis he was discharged on the 1st of November 1918.

On 11th March 1919 Private Sheppard was sent to the Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny, England.

On 29th April 1918 Private Sheppard was charged with being absent without leave from midnight 24th April 1918 to 9.45 p.m. on 26th April 1918. He was awarded 2 days field punishment No. 2, and forfeited 4 days pay.

On 2nd July 1918 he was attached to Depot Wiltshire Regiment at Devizes in England until 27th July 1918.

On 18th August 1918 he has charged with being absent without leave at Sutton Veny from 9.30 a.m. on 11th August 1918 until 6.30 a.m. on 12th August 1918.  He was awarded 2 days field punishment No. 2, and forfeited 3 days pay.

On 28th October 1918 he was admitted to a military hospital with conjunctivitis.  He was discharged from Sutton Veny Hospital on 1st November 1918.

On 1st April 1919 Private Sheppard transferred to the Australian Army Service Corps Depot at Parkhouse, England.

On 5th June 1919 Private Sheppard was charged with being absent without leave from 2200 on 31st May 1919 till 2100 on 1st June 1919. He was fined 1 days pay.

On 30th July 1919 Private Sheppard was charged with being absent without leave from 2130 on 18th July 1919 till 1500 on 25th July 1919. He was awarded 7 days field punishment number 2 and fined 14 days pay.

On 22nd October 1919 he married Matilda Maud Miller, a 23 year old widow, at the Register Office at Warminster, England.

On 21st November 1919 Private Sheppard was placed on indefinite leave.

Private Sheppard returned to Australia with his new wife on H.T. Runic on 20th December 1919.

He disembarked in Australia on 6th February 1920.

He was discharged on 12th March 1920.

[1] ‘Barometer of patriotism’, Lithgow Mercury, 5 November 1915, p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218448463

Henry James Naughton BLAKEMAN

Henry James Naughton BLAKEMAN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4442), Henry James Naughton Blakeman was born at York, Western Australia. He gave his age as 21 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as plumber. (However his Certificate of Discharge in his service record states he was only 17 years of age when he enlisted, and his birth was registered in Western Australia in 1898).[1] His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 122 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had had 6 months previous military service with the Cadets and served 3 years with the 41st Infantry.

He was attested at Lithgow by Captain Eade on 2nd November 1915, when the Coo-ees were at Lithgow, and completed his medical on 3rd November 1915 at Lithgow.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Bowenfels, Cascade Street, Katoomba, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, H. N. [Henry Naughton] Blakeman, at the same address.

On 16th February 1916 Private Blakeman was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas on active service, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 Private Dawson, (along with the other Coo-ees he had travelled to Egypt with), was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post.

On 23rd May 1916 Private Blakeman was sent to a Field Ambulance suffering from Abcess. On 25th May 1916 he was transferred to No. 2 Casualty Clearing Station at Ferry Post in Egypt. On 28th May 1916 he was discharged and rejoined his unit.

On 19th June 1916 Private Blakeman left Alexandria aboard H.T. Caledonian bound for France, and arrived at Marseilles on 29th June 1916.

On the night of the 19/20th July 1916 Private Blakeman was with the 54th Battalion when it participated in the Battle of Fromelles in France. During the battle he was wounded in action, suffering a shrapnel wound to his left thigh, and was sent to a Field Ambulance.

On 21st July 1916 he was sent back to the 32nd Stationary Hospital at Wimereux, France. On 22nd July 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria at Boulogne in France for evacuation to England. The next day, on 23rd July 1916, he was admitted to the Chatham Military Hospital at Chatham, England.

On 13th October 1916 Private Blakeman was discharged from hospital and granted leave to report to the Number 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs, England on 28th October 1916.

On 1st November 1916 he was transferred to the 14th Training Battalion at Wareham, England.

On 12th November 1916 Private Blakeman departed Folkestone, England aboard the Transport Princess Clementine bound for France. He marched out to rejoin the 54th Battalion on 15th November 1916 when it was training at Rainneville in France.[2]

On 1st February 1917 Private Blakeman was sent to the 15th Australian Field Ambulance suffering Trench Feet.

On 11th February 1917 he was moved back to a Casualty Clearing Station with Septic Feet. On 12th February 1917 he was placed aboard the 15th Ambulance Train and transferred to the 12th General Hospital at Rouen in France, where he was admitted on 13th February 1917.

On 3rd March 1917 he was transferred to the 2nd Convalescent Depot.

He was discharged on 13th March 1917, and marched into the 5th Division Base Depot at Etaples, France.

On 17th March 1917 Private Blakeman departed the 5th Division Base Depot and re-joined the 54th Battalion on 18th March 1917, which was in the vicinity of Beaulencourt in France.[3]

On 19th April 1917 Private Blakeman was sent to the 8th Australian Field Ambulance suffering from Enteritis. On 20th April 1917 he was moved back to a Casualty Clearing Station, then to the 5th Division Rest Station.

He was discharged on 11th May 1917 and rejoined the 54th Battalion on 12th May 1917, when it was at Noreuil in France, preparing to move into the front line at the Hindenburg Line in the vicinity of Reincourt, France.[4]

On 9th July 1917 Private Blakeman was detached to the 14th Machine Gun Company.

On 28th August 1917 he was transferred from the 54th Battalion to the 14th Machine Gun Company, which later became part of the 5th Machine Gun Battalion.

On 3rd February 1918 Private Blakeman went on leave to England. He returned to the 5th Machine Gun Battalion on 20th February 1918.

After the Armistice, on 19th November 1918 Private Blakeman went on leave to England.

He returned to the 5th Machine Gun Battalion on 3rd December 1918.

On 22nd January 1919 Private Blakeman was detached for duty at the Corps workshops. He returned to the 5th Machine Gun Battalion on 2nd March 1919.

On 22nd March 1919 Private Blakeman marched into the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve in France.

On 1st April 1919 he departed Le Harve in France, and arrived at Weymouth in England on 2nd April 1919, and marched in to Number 2 Command Depot.

Private Blakeman departed Devonport in England on 15th May 1919 for return to Australia, aboard the H.T. Orontes. He disembarked at Sydney on 1st July 1919.

He was discharged from the AIF Termination of Period of Enlistment on 23rd August 1919.

[1] WA Birth Registration 1898, Number 5054, Henry James Naughton Blakeman / Henry Naughton Blakeman and Annie Catherine Kelly.

[2] AWM4 23/71/10 – November 1916, Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, 54th Battalion.

[3] AWM4 23/71/14 – March 1917, Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, 54th Battalion.

[4] AWM4 23/71/16 – May 1917, Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, 54th Battalion.

 

 

James Birrell DAWSON

James Birrell DAWSON

Walter Goodlet (left) and James Birrell Dawson (right), both amputees. Photograph courtesy of James Dawson's great granddaughter Jamie Stacey.

Coo-ees Walter Goodlet (left) and James Dawson (right), both amputees. Photograph courtesy of James Dawson’s great-grandson Jamie Stacey.

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4469), James Birrell Dawson was born at Joadga Creek, N.S.W. He gave his age as 19 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 3 ¾ inches tall, weight 122 lbs., with a fresh complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed that he had 12 months previous military experience with the Senior Cadets in Lithgow, and that he had been rejected by the 41st Infantry [Regiment of the Militia] for being ‘not tall enough’.

He completed his medical on 31s October 1915 at Lithgow, but was not attested until 13th November 1915 at Liverpool (by Lieutenant Edward Shaw). His ‘joined on’ date was 2nd November 1915.

The Lithgow Mercury reported that ‘He was formerly employed as a wheeler at the Oakey Park colliery’, and that he ‘enlisted with the “Coo-ees” and marched to Sydney with this body of men’.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

A farewell party was held for Private Dawson at Oakey Park in early January 1916 before his departure overseas, where he was presented with a fountain pen, military hairbrush, and comb, and ‘dancing and singing were indulged in until the small hours’.[2]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Oakey Park, Lithgow, N.S.W, and his next of kin is listed as his father, G. [George] Dawson, at the same address.

On 16th February 1916 Private Dawson was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas on active service, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 Private Dawson, (along with the other Coo-ees he had travelled to Egypt with), was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post.

On 19th June 1916 Private Dawson left Alexandria aboard H.T. Caledonian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 29th June 1916.

On the night of the 19/20th July 1916 Private Dawson was with the 54th Battalion when it participated in the Battle of Fromelles. During the battle he was wounded in action, suffering a gun shot wound to his right forearm.

He was treated by the 15th Australian Field Ambulance, then moved back to the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station. On 21st July 1916 he was placed aboard an Ambulance Train, and moved back to the 30th General Hospital at Calais, France. His right arm was amputated due to his wounds.

On 3rd August 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Newhaven for evacuation to England. Later that day he was admitted to the Huddersfield War Hospital.

On 8th September he was taken on strength by No. 2 Command Depot, Weymouth, England.

A letter that Private Dawson wrote home to his mother during his time convalescencing at Weymouth in England was published in the Lithgow Mercury:

‘Private James Dawson, Lithgow, writing to his mother from Monte Video camp, Weymouth, Dorset, under date September 11 [1916], said he was quite well. His arm (which was amputated) was about healed up and did not trouble him at all then. He had been in England since August 3. He was in Huddersfield Hospital until September 8, when he was removed to the first-named address. While he was a Huddersfield he had an enjoyable time. He was only there three days before he was out to three garden parties in succession, and had a “great time.” They were the first Australians to go there and the people could not do enough for them. He always had plenty of places to go to for tea. All the picture shows and theatres were free to them, and even the young ladies used to take the chaps home to tea with them, and it was a great place. But it was very quiet at Weymouth after having been at Huddersfield’. [3]

On 20th September 1916 he was transferred to the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Southall, England, which specialised in fitting artificial limbs.

On 21st December 1916 Private Dawson was discharged from hospital, and granted furlough, to report back to the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital on 5th January 1917.

During his stay at the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital he wrote the following letter home to his mother, which was published in the Lithgow Mercury:

‘Pte. James Dawson, writing from the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital, Southall, England, to his mother, Mrs G. Dawson, Oakey Park, under date February 9 [1917], says:–“I am getting on splendidly. I have had another operation since I last wrote, making three in all. But I think it will be the last, as I have been measured for the artificial arm and will be getting it in two or three weeks. I am having a very good time here – always going out to tea or theatre parties, etc. In fact, the people can’t do enough for us. We are getting well looked after in hospital, but I am getting sick of hospital life. It has been nothing else but snow these last few weeks. No sun ever shines; it is only wind and snow. I don’t think they have any summer at all. I received the other day four letters addressed to Egypt. They chased me all round the country. They were very dirty and torn when I got them; otherwise they were all right. I have only had one parcel but no papers. I don’t know where those sent got to.[4]

On 5th April 1917 Private Dawson was discharged from the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital to commence his return to Australia.

Private Dawson departed Devonport, England on 4th May 1917, aboard the Transport Themistocles. Also travelling with him on the same ship was his friend and fellow Coo-ee Walter Goodlet, who had also lost an arm.

They disembarked at Sydney on 5th July 1917.

Private Dawson was discharged medically unfit, with a disability of an amputated right arm, on 12th December 1917.

[1] ‘Wounded in France’, Lithgow Mercury, 2 August 1916, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218730143

[2] ‘Presentation to Pte. Jas. Dawson’, Lithgow Mercury, 10 January 1916, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218732433

[3] ‘Our Soldiers’ Letter Box’, Lithgow Mercury, 8 November 1916 p. 1, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218724555

[4] ‘Our Soldiers’ Letter Box. Private James Dawson’, Lithgow Mercury, 27 April 1917, p. 7, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218761454

 

Colin David WREN

Colin David WREN

Colin David Wren. Photograph courtesy of P. Kahler.

Colin David Wren. Photograph courtesy of P. Kahler.

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4623), Colin David Wren was born at Calcutta, India. He gave his age as 40 years and 5 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 inches tall, weight 142 lbs., with a medium complexion, green eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had six years previous military experience in India. He completed his medical on 19th October 1915 at Lithgow, and was attested by Lieutenant F. Middenway at Lithgow on 2nd November 1915 (when the Coo-ees were in Lithgow).

He was reported as having joined the Coo-ees in the Cowra Free Press.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Private Wren was given a send-off at Tallarook woolshed [near Broula] in January 1916, where he was presented with a gold wristlet watch, and he ‘in responding, made a vigorous appeal to the manhood of Broula to enlist, and was successful in securing five recruits’.[2]

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Grenfield [i.e. Grenfell] Road, Broula, via Cowra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs. M. [Margaret] Wren, at the same address.

On 16th February 1916 Private Wren was one of the first group of Coo-ees to embark overseas on active service, and departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70 as 14th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

HMAT Ballarat A70, 18/2/1916. Photograph from the AWM Collection PB0182.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 Private Wren, (along with the other Coo-ees he had travelled to Egypt with), was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post.

On 12th April 1916 Private Wren was transferred to the 1st Australian Stationary Hospital at Ismailia, Egypt, with Stricture. On 27th April 1916 he was transferred to the British Red Cross Convalescent Home in Montazah. On 8th May 1916 he was discharged for duty to Tel-el-Kebir.

On 25th May 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion.

On 5th June 1916 he proceeded to join the British Expeditionary Force in France from Alexandria aboard the Transport Ionian. He disembarked at Marseilles on 15th June 1916.

On 25th October 1916, he was detached for duty at the 1st Anzac Headquarters, from the 4th Australian Divisional Base Depot.

On 8th January 1917 he was taken on strength of the 4th Pioneer Battalion in the field.

Three months later he was admitted to the 1st Field Ambulance sick, on 4th April 1917. He was transferred to the 10th General Hospital in Rouen on 9th April 1917. On 1st May 1917 he was transferred to England on the Hospital Ship Western Australia. He was admitted to the 2nd Southern General Hospital in Bristol with old stricture, on 2nd May 1917.

During the time he was convalescing in hospital in Bristol , Private Wren wrote in a letter dated 16th June 1916, that was reported on in the Cowra Free Press, of ‘his praise of the people of that town in regard to their treatment of wounded Australians’, and he described being taken for a drive around the city by the local people, and he said ‘he and hundreds of other wounded Australians thanked God for the hospitable and kind way in which they had been treated by the people of England’.[3]

On 27th July 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Auxiliary Hospital from the 2nd Southern General Hospital, with Cystitis.

On 30th July 1917 Private Wren was discharged from hospital, and granted two weeks leave until 13th August 1917, when he reported to No. C. Depot in Weymouth, England.

On 27th September 1917 Private Wren left England for return to Australia on the transport Suevic.

On 3rd January 1918 he was discharged at Sydney as medically unfit.

[1] Another “Cooee!”, Cowra Free Press, 13 November 1915, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99695508

[2] A Soldier Farewelled’, Cowra Free Press, 22 January 1916, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99696556

[3] ‘Soldier’s letters’, Cowra Free Press, 8 September 1917, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99711897

 

 

 

Walter James GOODLET

Walter James GOODLET

Coo-ees Walter Goodlet (left) and James Birrell Dawson (right), both amputees. Photograph courtesy of James Dawson's great grandson Jamie Stacey.

Coo-ees Walter Goodlet (left) and James Birrell Dawson (right), both amputees. Photograph courtesy of James Dawson’s great grandson Jamie Stacey.

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4780), Walter James Goodlet was born at Sofala, N.S.W. He gave his age as 21 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as miner. His description on his medical was height 5feet 9 inches tall, weight 123 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Presbyterian. He claimed that he had 6 months previous military service with the 41st Infantry (Militia).

He was one of three men who stepped forward at the recruiting meeting in Yetholme around a bonfire in the school ground, and ‘arranged to join the “Coo-ees” at Lithgow’.[1]

He caught the train to Lithgow where he joined the Coo-ees.[2]

He completed his medical on the 2nd November 1915 at Lithgow, and was attested by Captain Eade at Lithgow on 2nd November 1915.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Glanmire, via Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, J. Goodlet, Glanmire, via Bathurst, N.S.W.

He was given a send off at Glanmire shortly before leaving Australia, where there was dancing, and he was presented with a wristlet watch, a pocket wallet, a £1 note from friends, ten shillings from the Walang school children, and two pairs of socks. The Bathurst Times reported that he ‘briefly thanked those present for their handsome presents, and hoped that some day he would have the pleasure of meeting them all again’.[3]

On 8th March 1916 Private Goodlet departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, arriving in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 27th May 1916 he was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel El Kebir, Egypt.

On 4th June 1916 Private Goodlet left Alexandria aboard the Scotian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 11th of June 1916.

Two months later, on 3rd August 1916, the 4th Pioneer Battalion was constructing communication trenches in Becourt Wood, France, when Private Goodlet was wounded in action, being struck by a the blast of a high explosive shell that shattered his the left arm. He was evacuated to the 4th Field Ambulance. On 6th August 1916 he was moved to the 1st General Hospital at Rouen, France. On 28th August 1916 he was transferred to England by the Hospital Ship Mahons, where he was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth, and his arm was amputated.

On 24th November 1916 Private Goodlet was transferred to the 2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Southall, England.

On 21st December 1916 Private Goodlet was granted leave. He reported back on 5th April 1917.

On 4th May 1917 Private Goodlet departed England bound for Australia aboard the Transport Themistocles (along with fellow Coo-ee Private James Dawson, who had also lost an arm).

H.T. Thermistocles arrived at Sydney on 5th July 1917.

He was discharged medically unfit, with a disability of an amputated left arm, on 4th January 1918.

[1] ‘The Coo-ees along the route at Glanmire and Yetholme’, The Bathurst Times, 1 November 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111237023

[2] ‘Personal’, The Bathurst Times, 8 March 1916, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109949686

[3] ‘Personal’, The Bathurst Times, 8 March 1916, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article109949686