Jacob Isak PALMGREN

Jacob Isak PALMGREN

Per his military service record (Depot), Jacob Isak Palmgren was born at Stockholm, Sweden. He stated he was a naturalised British subject. He gave his age as 33 years and 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as engine driver. His description on his certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 6 ½ inches tall, weight 154 lbs., with a dark complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Lutherian.   He listed his next of kin as friend, Mr. W. Richard, Wongarbon, N.S.W.

“J. T. Palmyren” was reported in The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate on 29th October 1915 as being one of the ‘Wongarbon boys’ with the Coo-ees.[1]

It appears he was one of the thirteen men who stepped forward and gave his name, ‘either to march under Captain Nicholas, or to come after harvest’, when the Coo-ees recruited in Wongarbon on 14th October 1915.[2]

He completed his medical examination on the 16th October 1915 at Wellington (while the Coo-ees were staying in this town).  He was attested by Captain Nicholas while the Coo-ees were at Stuart Town on the 19th October 1915. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

After completing the remainder of the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 7th December 1915 he was charged with being absent without leave from the 3rd to the 7th of December 1915. He was fined 1 Pound.

The Wellington Times reported on 13th January 1916 that the ‘Wongarbon folk’ gave a farewell on New Year’s Eve to ‘the local lads who had joined the Coo-ees’, and were back in Wongarbon on final leave, and that the ‘guests of the evening were Sergeants T. Dowd and H. Davenport, and Privates W. McDonald, E. May, and J. Palmgren’.[3]  They were each presented with a wristlet watch.

Private Palmgren was charged with being absent without leave from the 1st to the 3rd February 1916, being absent from special all night piquet on 5th  February 1916, and being absent without leave from the 10th to the 13th February 1916.  He was fined another pound.

On 15th February 1916 Private Palmgren went before a Medical Board at Liverpool Camp due to bad haemorrhoids. On 22nd February 1916 Private Palmgren was discharged medically unfit.

On 30th December 1916 Jacob Isak Palmgren re-enlisted at Dubbo. He completed his medical examination, and was attested, at Dubbo on 30th December 1916.  He was at Sydney Showground Camp in 3rd Depot Battalion from 2nd January to the 4th January 1917, then was placed in the 9th reinforcements for the 45th Battalion on 4th January 1917.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wongarbon, N.S.W.  His next of kin was listed as his friend, William Richard, Wongarbon, Western Line, N.S.W.  His religion was recorded on this document as Unitarian.

Private Palmgren (regimental no. 3432) departed Sydney on the HMAT Anchises A68 just over three weeks from re-enlisting, on 24th January 1917. He arrived at Devonport in England on 27th March 1917.

He marched into the 12th Training Battalion at Codford the same day.

Two days later, on 29th March 1917 Private Palmgren was admitted to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford sick. He was transferred to Parkhouse on 23rd April 1917.  He was discharged from hospital on 9th May 1917.

On 2nd November 1917 Private Palmgren departed Southampton, England, for France, as reinforcement for the 45th Battalion.  He arrived in Havre, France, the next day, and marched in to the Australian Infantry Base Depot.

On 8th November 1917 he marched out to join the 36th Battalion.

On 17th November 1917 he was taken on strength of the 36th Battalion from the 9th reinforcements for the 45th Battalion, when the 36th Battalion was resting at Vieux-Berquin, France.

On12th February 1918 Private Palmgren was admitted to hospital sick. He rejoined the 36th Battalion on 14th February 1918.

On 30th April 1918 Private Palmgren was transferred to the 34th Battalion while it was at Franvillers.   He also was admitted to the Casualty Clearing Station sick with Influenza on the same day.

On 2nd May 1918 he was admitted to the 3rd Stationary Hospital at Rouen with Influenza. He was transferred to No. 2 Convalescent Depot at Rouen  on 6th May 1918. He was moved to the No. 1 Convalescent Depot at Rouelles the next day.  He was discharged to the Australian Infantry  Base Depot on  Havre on 17th May 1918.

On 12th June 1918 he marched back out to the Front , and rejoined his unit on 18th June 1918.

On 11th July 1918 Private Palmgren was charged with being absent without leave from 9.30 pm on 6th July 1918 to 9.30 pm on 8th July 1918. He was awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 2 and forfeiture of 17 days days pay.

On 20th July 1918 he was admitted to the 5rh Casualty Clearing Station sick with Pyrexia. He rejoined his unit on 29th July 1918.

On 23rd August 1918 Private Palmgren was slightly wounded in action when the 34th Battalion was in the line near Vaire-sous-Corbie, France.  He remained on duty with the Battalion.

On 31st August 1918 he was wounded a second time when the 34th Battalion was attacking along the Somme River between Bray and Curlu, France. He was admitted to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station. The next day we was evacuated, and admitted to the 2nd General Hospital in Havre on 1st September 1918, with a gunshot wound to his nose. On 7th September 1918 he was transferred to No. 1 Australian Convalescent Depot at Havre.

On 12th September 1918 Private Palmgren was discharged to the Australian Infantry Base Depot, where he was charged with when being on active service (1) drunkenness, and (2) absent from 9.30 pm to 9.45 pm on 9th September 1918. He was awarded forfeiture of 14 days pay.

He was admitted to the 39th General Hospital in Havre two days later, on 14th September 1918.  He remained in hospital until 5th November 1918, when he was discharge to the Australian Infantry Base Depot at Havre.

On 16th November 1918 Private Palmgren was charged with being absent with drunkenness and being absent without leave from 0930 to 2130 on 8th November 1918. He was also charged with being in town without a pass.  He was awarded 14 days field punishment no. 2, and forfeited 15 days pay.

Private Palmgren marched out to rejoin his unit on 2nd December 1918.

On 18th January 1919 Private Palmgren was chargd with being absent without leave from 0900 to 1930 on 5th January 1919, and drunkenness.  He was awarded 7 days field punishment no. 2, and forfeited 9 days pay.

Private Palmgren departed France on 21st April 1919, and marched in to Codford, England on 22nd April 1919.

He was granted leave from 20th June 1919 to report to Sutton Veny on 31st July 1919.  His leave was extended to 22nd August 1919.

Private Palmgren commenced his return to Australia from England aboard the H.T.  Euripides on 8th September 1919.  He disembarked in Sydney on 24th October 1919.

He was discharged termination period of enlistment on 1st December 1919.

 

[1] ‘Our Soldiers’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate,  29 October 1915, p. 4. Retrieved December 18, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77601711

[2] ‘The Route March’, The Farmer and Settler, 19 October 1915, p. 3. Retrieved December 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116648940

[3] ‘Wongarbon’,  (1916, January 13). Wellington Times, 13 January 1916, p. 5. Retrieved December 18, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143393008

 

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