Category Archives: Roll of honour

Oliver James HARMON

Oliver James HARMON

Private O. J. Harmon, ca. 1916 (Photograph: Australian War Memorial)

Private O. J. Harmon, ca. 1916 (Photograph: Australian War Memorial)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4791), Oliver James Harmon was born at Redfern, N.S.W. He gave his age as 31 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as boiler makers’ assistant. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 10 ½ inches tall, weight 160 lbs., with blue eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 10th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested at Ashfield on the 11th November 1915.

According to The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, he ‘had done a good deal of shearing in the West, and was personally known to many of the Gilgandra Coo-ees, whom he had joined when they passed through Parramatta’.[1]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Alfred Street, Granville, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, W. H. Harmon, Alfred Street, Granville, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Harmon departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England along with many of the other Coo-ees, arriving in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Harmon was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-El-Kebir, Egypt.

On 4th June 1916 Private Harmon left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

On 25th June 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was at Armentieres, France, constructing defensive works. On this day Private Harmon was placed under arrest for Disobeying a Lawful Command Given By a Superior Officer (he did not accompany a Corporal to draw stores when ordered to do so) and Using Insubordinate Language To a Superior Officer (to the same Corporal). He was held in custody until a Field General Court Martial was held on the 8th of July 1916 at Fleurbaix, France. He was sentenced to 14 days Field Punishment Number 2.

On 6th August 1916 the 4th Pioneer Battalion was maintaining Tramway Trench in the ruins of the village of Pozieres which was under heavy German artillery fire during the Battle of Pozieres when Private Harmon was killed in action. Also killed with him in the 4th Pioneer Battalion on the same day were fellow Coo-ees John Tarlington (who joined the Coo-ees at Blayney), and Karl Alex Frederick Neilson (who joined the Coo-ees at Springwood).

Private Harmon has no known grave, and is remembered on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial in France.

Private Harmon's name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Harmon’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Harmon’s name is commemorated on panel 174 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Private Harmon’s name is also remembered on the Granville War Memorial.

[1] ‘Killed in action’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 9 September 1916, p. 10, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86076476

 

Francis Charles FINLAYSON

Francis Charles FINLAYSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 6251), Francis Charles Finlayson was born at Redfern, N.S.W. He gave his age as 28 years, his marital status as married, and his occupation as book keeper. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 11 inches tall, weight 140 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 11th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested at Parramatta on 11th November 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 3rd of February 1916 Private Finlayson was charged with being Absent Without Leave from the Liverpool Camp on the 1st and 2nd of February 1916. He was fined two days forfeiture of pay. On the 7th of March 1916 Private Finlayson was made an Acting Corporal.

After further training in Australia, Acting Corporal Finlayson departed Sydney on the HMAT A14 Euripides on 9th September 1916, as 20th reinforcement for the 13th Battalion. With him travelled fellow Coo-ees Acting Sergeant Thomas W. Dowd, and Acting Sergeant Stanley E. Stephens.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was George Street, Parramatta, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs. M.[May] Finlayson, 5 Trafalgar Street, Armidale [sic] (Annandale), N.S.W.

He arrived at Plymouth, England, on 26th October 1916. On 4rd November 1916 Acting Corporal Finlayson marched into the 4th Training Battalion at Codford, England.

On 16th January 1917 Acting Corporal Finlayson left Folkestone aboard the SS Princess Victoria bound for France, marching into the 4th Division Base Depot at Etaples on 17th January 1917. Upon marching into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot he reverted to his substantive rank of Private.

On 21st January 1917 Private Finlayson was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion whilst it was at Mametz, France conducting fatigue duties.

On 4th February 1917 the 13th Battalion was taking part in an attack on the German trenches in the vicinity of Guedecourt, France. During this action Private Finlayson was killed in action.

According to a letter written home from Private Charlie C. Carr, another soldier from Parramatta, dated 12th February 1917, Frank Finlayson was killed at his side. He wrote: ‘He was in the same platoon, and had only just joined us up. It was his first time in the trenches. He had a great nerve and proved himself a splendid fighter. We had just attacked and taken the German position, when they opened up terribly heavy artillery fire. Frank bravely went out to carry in a wounded German, and got in quite safely, but it was only about five or ten minutes after that he was killed by a German high explosive shell’.[1]

This night was also fellow Coo-ee Stanley E. Stephens ‘first hop-over’ and ‘baptism of fire’ raid against the German trenches, in the same company. He wrote in a letter published in The Farmer and Settler on 17th August 1917 that on the night of 4th February Finlayson was on his left just before the hop-over, and their objective was a trench ‘known as Stormy trench, in which Fritz had a strong post’. He reported that ‘a mess-tin full of rum’ was passed along, and ‘everyone took a swig, and passed it on’, and that he ’gulped down a couple of mouthfuls and handed it to Fin’. After taking the trench and some German prisoners, they returned to their own trench. Stephens reported that ‘Finlayson was separated from us in the hop-over, and entered the trench some distance on our right’, and the Germans began a bombardment ‘putting them into us’. He continued that about midnight ‘Fin. Came along the trench looking for us’, and that ‘after yarning for a minute or two he went back to fetch his web gear and rifle, etc., up to our ‘possy’. Stephens wrote that ‘he and I had been mates for a long while, back in Kiama’, and he ‘had only been gone about ten minutes when another mate named Moss Paine came to tell me that Fin. was killed’, and that he ‘went back along the trench with Moss, but Fin. had been hit in the chest with a piece of shell that exploded in the trench, and had dropped without a word’.[2]

Private Finlayson has no known grave. He left a widow and three young children.

His name is remembered on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France.

Private Finlayson's name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Finlayson’s name on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Finlayson’s name is commemorated on panel 69 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

F. C. Finlayson’s name is also remembered on the Parramatta War Memorial.

[1] ‘Letters Home’, The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 21 April 1917, p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86090288

[2] ‘A baptism of fire’, The Farmer and Settler, 17 August 1917, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116642518

 

Allan James DENMEAD

Allan James DENMEAD

Per his military service record (regimental no. 3017), Allen James Denmead was born at Goulburn, N.S.W. [His first name is spelt elsewhere as Allan]. He gave his age as 27 years and 8 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 10 stone 8 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He was attested at Bathurst by Captain Eade on the 28th October 1915.

His preliminary medical examination report on his Application to enlist form in his service record, signed at Bathurst on 22nd October 1915, noted that he ‘has Varicose Veins in legs & willing to have them operated on’. His medical certificate was not signed during the march.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp with the Coo-ees as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

His medical certificate was signed at Liverpool Camp on 13th November 1915, however this had the note “signed in error”. Whilst at Liverpool Camp Private Denmead went before a medical board on 29th November 1915 where he was deemed unfit for military service due to having Varicose Veins in both legs. He was discharged on the 13th of December 1915.

The National Advocate reported that ‘Private Denmead joined the “Coo-ees” at Bathurst, but on arrival in Sydney he was discharged to undergo an operation’, and ‘on recovering he again enlisted’.[1]

On 28th June 1916 he re-enlisted at Bathurst under the name Allan James Denmead. He claimed 7 weeks previous military experience at Liverpool with the A.I.F. before being medically discharged. He stated that his trade or calling was butcher on this attestation paper. He attended the Showground in Bathurst and underwent a medical which he passed [his varicose veins not being noted], and he was attested on 28th June 1916 at Bathurst. He went into camp and began training as part of the 7th reinforcements for the 53rd Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was 69 Rocket Street, Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs. Mary [Ester] Jane Denmead, 69 Rocket Street, Bathurst, N.S.W.

Private Denmead departed Sydney on the HMAT A11 Ascanius on 25th October 1916. He arrived in Devonport, England, on 28th December 1916. He was sent to the 14th Training Battalion at Hurdcott, England.

On 28th February 1917 Private Denmead departed Folkestone aboard the SS Golden Eagle for France. He arrived at the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples on 1st March 1917. On 21st March he joined departed the 5th Australian Division Base Depot bound for the 19th Battalion, having been transferred from the 53rd Battalion. On 23rd March 1917 Private Denmead joined the 19th Battalion whilst it was at the village of Grevillers in France repairing billets and roads.

Private Denmead was with the 19th Battalion as it saw action around Noreuil, France, in April 1917.

On 3rd May 1917 the 19th Battalion was part of an attack on the Hindenburg Line in the vicinity of Bullecourt, France. During this unsuccessful attack Private Denmead was reported Missing in Action.

A Court of Enquiry held by the 19th Battalion on 11th December 1917 reported that he was now listed as Killed in Action on the 3rd of May 1917.

His family inserted the following notice in the National Advocate (17/1/1918 p. 2):

‘Honor Roll. DENMEAD,–Private Allen James Denmead, killed in action at Bullecourt on May 3rd, 1917, aged 29 years. Previously reported missing on that date.
In a soldier’s grave he’s lying,
Somewhere in Bullecourt he fell,
Little we thought when he left us,
It would be our last farewell.
Loving remembrance will last forever.
Inserted by his loving wife Ettie, and children Rose, Harold, and Daisy’.[2]

Private Denmead has no known grave and his name is remembered on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France.

A.J. Denmead's name on the Villers-Brettoneux Memorial (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson, 7/9/2015)

A.J. Denmead’s name on the Villers-Brettoneux Memorial (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson, 7/9/2015)

Private Denmead’s name is commemorated on panel 88 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

[1] ‘A “Cooee” Missing’, National Advocate, 8 June 1917, p. 2, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158485185

[2] ‘Advertising’, National Advocate, 17 January, 1918, p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158501973

 

Harold Brooks DAVIS

Harold Brooks DAVIS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4759), Harold Brooks Davis was born at Parramatta, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 18 years [though he was much younger than this], his marital status as single, and his occupation as plumber. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 100 lbs., with a dark complexion, grey eyes, and dark brown hair. His religious denomination was Methodist. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

It is not certain where Harold Brooks Davis joined the Coo-ee March.  His “Joined on” date on his attestation paper was the 8th November 1915, the day the Coo-ees travelled from Lawson to Springwood. The Blue Mountain Echo reported that ‘he joined the “Coo-ees” in their memorable march o’er the Mountains’.[2] The Farmer and Settler reported that ‘a halt of only fifteen minutes was made at Leura, but two recruits joined’ following a recruiting address on 6th November 1915.[3]  The names of the two recruits who stepped forward at his home town of Leura were not reported in local newspapers at the time.

However he did not complete his medical until three days later, on the 11th November 1915 at Ashfield, and he was attested at Ashfield on the 11th November 1915. The Coo-ees had a recruitment meeting and stayed in Ashfield at the Drill Hall on the night of 11th November 1915 – the last night of the march.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Northcote Street, Leura, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, J. [James] Davis, Northcote Street, Leura, N.S.W.

Private Davis departed Sydney on the HMAT Star of England along with many of the Coo-ees on the 8th March 1916. He arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On the 19th April 1916 he transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On the 2nd June 1916 Private Davis left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 8th June 1916.

Private Davis served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916, then the Battle of the Somme around Poziers, Mouquet Farm, and Flers.

On 5th January 1917 the 45th Battalion was at Dernacourt, France, preparing to move forward into the front lines, when Private Davis was evacuated to the Anzac Rest Station with a Septic Foot. He remained at the Rest Station until 31st January 1917, when he rejoined the Battalion when it was at Mametz, France, resting and providing working parties behind the lines.

Just three weeks later, on 21st February 1917 Private Davis received multiple gunshot wounds when the 45th Battalion was engaged in action at Gueudecourt, France. He was evacuated to the 45th Casualty Clearing Station.

On 27th February 1917 he was evacuated by the 21st Hospital Train to the 6th General Hospital at Rouen, France, where he died of his wounds the next day, on 28th February 1917.

Private Davis is buried in the St. Sever Cemetery Extension at Rouen, France.

Harold Brooks Davis' headstone at St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Harold Brooks Davis’ headstone at St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson 7/9/2014)

Private Davis’ name is commemorated on panel 139 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour. His age at time of death is recorded on the Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour database, and on his headstone, as being 16 years of age.

His birth certificate shows that he was born on 1st March 1901, the son of James Davis and Elizabeth Davis (nee Brooks).[4]  This means that he had been only 14 years, 8 months, and 7 days old, when he joined the Coo-ee March. He was the youngest of the Coo-ees.

Sadly, when he died of his wounds on 28th February 1917, he was still only 15 years old – this was the day before his 16th birthday.

Private Davis’ name is also remembered on the Leura Lone Pine Park Memorial Gates.

[1] NAA: B2455, DAVIS H B

[2] ‘Leura’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 9 March 1917, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108247441

[3] ‘The route march’, The Farmer and Settler, 9 November 1915, p. 3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article116669569

[4] NSW Birth Certificate Parramatta 15787/1901 Harold B. Davis

Charles Alfred HAMPSON

Charles Alfred HAMPSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4789), Charles Alfred Hampson was born at Petersham, N.S.W.[1] He gave his age as 17 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as machinist. He had worked at the Small Arms Factory in Lithgow prior to enlisting. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 2 inches tall, weight 108 lbs., with a medium complexion, grey eyes, and blue grey [sic] hair. His religious denomination was Baptist. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 31st October 1915 at Lithgow, and was attested at Lithgow on the 1st November 1915. His father’s signature giving his consent for his son to enlist is on Charles Hampson’s initial Application to enlist form.

His father Lightfoot Lamonby Hampson, with address Redgalein, Hassans Walls Road, Lithgow, N.S.W., was first listed as his next of kin on his Attestation paper, but this was changed to his grandmother, Mrs Dorothy Hampson, at the same address, after his father enlisted with the Coo-ees as well, catching up with them by the time they reached Lawson.

Although Charles Alfred Hampson gave his age as 17 years and 8 months on his Attestation paper, his birth certificate shows that he was born on 11 February 1899, so Charles had upped his age by one year, and was only actually 16 years and 8 months when he enlisted, which made him one of the youngest of the Coo-ees.[2]

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion (along with his father).

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Redgalein, Hussans [sic] Walls Road, Lithgow, N.S.W. His father Lightfoot Hampson was issued with regimental no. 4790, the next number after his.

On 8th March 1916 Private Hampson departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, accompanied by his father Lightfoot Hampson, and many of the other Coo-ees. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Gunner Hampson was transferred to the 4th Division Artillery at Tel-el-Kebir (along with his father Lightfoot).

On 21st April 1916 he was taken on the strength of the 10th Field Artillery Brigade and posted to the 10th Brigade Ammunition Column at Serapeum (along with his father). On the 27th May they were both taken on strength of the 4th Division Ammunition Column.

On the 6th June 1916 both Gunner Hampsons left Alexandria aboard the HMT Oriana bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 13th June 1916.

On the 29th June 1916 he was mustered as Driver. (His father was also mustered as Driver on the same day).

On the 2nd August 1916 Driver Hampson was charged with using insolent language to his superior officer, and not immediately obeying an order given by his superior officer. On 3rd August 1916 he was awarded 14 days Field Punishment no. 2 by the Commanding officer of the 4th Division Ammunition Column.

On 16th September 1916 he attended the Trench Mortar School at Berthen (along with his father). They both returned to their unit on 30th September 1916, when it was at Vlamertinghe near Ypres, Belgium.

On 5th November 1916 he reverted to Gunner at his own request. (His father also reverted to Gunner at his own request on the same day). On 2nd December 1916 he was admitted to the 5th Field Ambulance with chilled feet. On 17th December 1916 he returned to his unit from the Field Ambulance.

On 22nd December 1916 he was transferred to the 10th Australian Field Artillery Brigade which was in the Somme Sector near Flers, France, and was posted to the 110th Howitzer Battery (along with his father).

According to the 10th Australian Field Artillery Brigade unit war diary, on 28th April 1917 the 110th Howitzer Battery were carrying out a gas shell bombardment on the village of Riencourt-les-Cagnicourt during the 1st Battle of Bullecourt. Gunner Charles Hampson was killed in action on this day. The loss of the son who he had enlisted with, embarked overseas with, trained in Egypt with, and fought alongside in France with, must have been devastating for his father Lightfoot Hampson.

Gunner Hampson is buried in the H.A.C. Cemetery, Ecoust-St. Mein, Arras, Nord Pas de Calais, France.

Charles Alfred Hampson's headstone at H.A.C. Cemetery, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson, 6/9/2014)

Charles Alfred Hampson’s headstone at H.A.C. Cemetery, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson, 6/9/2014)

Gunner Hampson’s name is commemorated on panel 16 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Gunner Hampson’s name is also listed on the Lithgow War Memorial.

[1] NAA: B2455, HAMPSON C A

[2] NSW Birth Certificate 6276/1899 HAMPSON  CHARLES A  LIGHTFOOT L  ROSE H  PETERSHAM

Charles William Gordon CONROY

Charles William Gordon CONROY

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4460), Charles William Gordon Conroy was born at Thames, New Zealand. He gave his age as 41 years and 6 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation as chemist. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 ¾ inches tall, weight 9 stone 2 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed to 6 months previous military service with the Rifle Corps, Waihi, N.Z. He undertook his medical on the 25th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested on 25th October 1915 at Orange by Captain Nicholas, “Gilgandra Recruits”, on the day the Coo-ees left Orange.

After completing the Coo-ee March Private Conroy went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Orange Post Office, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his wife, Mrs. M. J. Conroy, Orange Post Office, N.S.W.

Private Conroy departed Sydney on the HMAT A70 Ballarat along with a group of other Coo-ees on the 16th February 1916 as 14th Reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

A note in his service record reports that Private Conroy was found guilty on 9th March 1916 while on the HMAT A70 Ballarat en route for Egypt of being absent without leave and breaking ranks at Columbo on 7th March 1916, and was fined £1.

Private Conroy arrived in Egypt on the HMAT A70 Ballarat on 22nd March 1916. On the 1st April 1916 he was transferred to the 54th Australian Infantry Battalion.

While in Egypt he was sent to the Field Ambulance at Katoomba Heights on 23rd May 1916. He was discharged from No. 1 Field Ambulance at Ferry Post and rejoined his unit on 26th May 1916.

He embarked on the HT Caledonian at Alexandria on 19th June 1916, and disembarked at Marseilles, France, on 29th June 1916.

Private Conroy participated in the 54th Battalion’s attack on the Germans in the Battle of Fromelles on 19th/20th July 1916. He was reported missing on 19th/20th July 1916, which was changed to be reported as Killed in Action 19th/20th July 1916 on 28th July 1916.

Private Conroy has no known grave, and his name is commemorated at the V. C. Corner Australian Cemetery and Memorial at Fromelles, France.

V.C. Corner Cemetery and Memorial (Photograph: H. Thompson 1/9/2014)

V.C. Corner Cemetery and Memorial (Photograph: S & H Thompson 1/9/2014)

"CONROY C W" name on V. C. Corner Cemetery and Memorial (Photograph: S & H Thompson, 1/9/2014)

“CONROY C. W.” name on V. C. Corner Cemetery and Memorial (Photograph: S & H Thompson 1/9/2014)

Private Conroy’s name is also commemorated on panel 158 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Samuel LUKE

Samuel LUKE

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4830), Samuel Henry Luke was born at St. Marys, N.S.W. He gave his age as 38 years and 11 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as Laborer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 8 inches tall, weight 154 lbs., with a medium complexion, brown eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 11th November, 1915 at Ashfield, and was attested at Ashfield on the 11th November, 1915.

However, according to the Nepean Times (13/11/1915, p. 6), he joined the Coo-ees on Wednesday 10th November 1915, when they were at St. Marys.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was St. Marys, near Penrith, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as brother, J. Luke, St. Marys, near Penrith, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916, Private Luke departed Sydney on the HMAT Star of England, arriving in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

He was sent to the 4th Training Battalion at Tel El Kebir, Egypt where he trained until the 25th of April 1916 and was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Serapeum, Egypt being taken on strength on the 29th of April 1916.

On 4th June 1916 Private Luke left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Private Luke served with the 4th Pioneer Battalion throughout its service on the Western Front including Pozieres in August 1916, Mouquet Farm in September 1916, and Flers in October 1916.

On 21st April 1917 during the First Battle of Bullecourt the 4th Pioneer Battalion was constructing tramways in the vicinity of Vaulx–Vraucourt, France when Private Luke was killed in action by a high explosive shell. He was buried in the Vaulx Hill Cemetery, France.

 

Samuel Luke's headstone at Vaulx Hill Cemetery, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson, 6/9/2014)

Samuel Luke’s headstone at Vaulx Hill Cemetery, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson, 6/9/2014)

Private Luke’s name is commemorated on panel 174 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Private Luke’s name is also listed on the St. Marys War Memorial.

Bernard COYTE

Bernard COYTE

Bernard Coyte, ca. 1915 (Photograph: Australian War Memorial P09199.001)

Bernard Coyte, ca. 1915 (Photograph: Australian War Memorial P09199.001)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4757), Bernard Coyte was born at Borenore, N.S.W. He gave his age as 21 years and 1 month, his marital status as single, and his occupation as farmer & labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 11 inches tall, weight 11 stone, with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and black hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 14th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested at Orange on the 14th October 1915.

He was reported in The Leader on 22nd October 1915 (p. 6) as one of the men who had ‘volunteered to join in the Coo-ees march as recruits when they arrive in Orange’. His date of joining on his attestation paper in his service record was 23rd October 1915. He joined the Coo-ees when they arrived in Orange on Saturday 23rd October 1915.

After completing the march he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Borenore, near Orange, N.S.W N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as father, W. Coyte, Borenore, near Orange, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Coyte departed Sydney along with many of the other Coo-ees on the HMAT A15 Star of England, arriving in Egypt on 11th April 1916. He was immediately admitted to the 31st General Hospital at Port Said sick. On 3rd May 1916 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Abbussia. He was discharged on 8th June 1916. On 28th July 1916 Private Coyte was charged with being Absent Without Leave from 1700 to 1900 on 28th July 1916 at Tel-El-Kebir. He was awarded 24 hours Field Punishment Number Two.

On 6th August 1916 Private Coyte left Alexandria aboard RMS Megantic bound for England. After arriving in England, later in August 1916 Private Coyte was posted to the 4th Training Battalion. On 30th August 1916 he was charged with Being Absent Without Leave from 0900 to 1600 on 29th August 1916. He was awarded Three days confined to Camp and forfeit One days pay.

On 22nd September 1916 Private Coyte embarked for France. On 24th September 1916 he marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples. On 4th October 1916 Private Coyte was taken on strength of the 13th Battalion whilst they were in action in the vicinity of Voormezele in Belgium.

On 15th January 1917 Private Coyte was admitted to the Corps Rest Station with scabies. On 23rd January 1917 he was transferred to the ANZAC R.B. sick with an illness Not yet Diagnosed. On 28th January 1917 he was transferred to the SMD Casualty Clearance Station sick.

On the 6th March 1917 he was discharged from Hospital to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot. On the 20th March 1917 Private Coyte rejoined the 13th Battalion.

On the 21st March 1917 Private Coyte was sent to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance with Influenza. On the 29th March 1916 he was admitted to the 3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Station with an Auxillary Abscess. On the 21st of April 1917 Private Coyte was embarked aboard the Hospital Ship St George for England suffering a Slight Debility. On 23rd April 1917 he was admitted to the Lewisham Military Hospital, and then on 30th April 1917 he was transferred to the Bermondsey Ladywell Hospital. On 28th May 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England. On 1st June 1917 he was discharged from 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital, and went on leave.

On 11th September 1917 he moved out of No. 1 Command Depot at Pernham Downs to Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge.

On 2nd November 1917 Private Coyte departed Southampton for France. On 3rd November 1917 he reported to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Havre. On 13th November 1917 he rejoined the 13th Battalion when it was conducting training at Fontaine Lez Boulans, France.

On 14th January 1918 Private Coyte was charged with Leaving a Train Without Permission from 12 noon on 11/01/18 to 8.30 pm on 12/01/18 he was awarded 10 days Field Punishment Number Two and forfeit 12 days pay.

On 4th March 1918 Private Coyte was admitted to the 13th Australian Field Ambulance then to the 2nd Australian Casualty Clearance Station with a condition Not Yet Diagnosed. On 6th March 1918 he was transferred to the 19th Ambulance Train, then on 9th March 1918 to the 39th General Hospital. On 12th March 1918 he was discharged, and marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot. On 14th March 1918 Private Coyte rejoined the 13th Battalion whilst it was training at Neuve Eglise, France.

On 28th June 1918 Private Coyte went on leave to Paris. He returned to his unit on 11th July 1918.

On 29th July 1918 he was admitted to the 4th Australian Field Ambulance sick. On 30th July 1918 he was transferred to the 12th Casualty Clearance Station sick. On 10th August 1918 he was sent to the Australian Corps Rest Centre and on 18th August 1918 he rejoined the 13th Battalion whilst it was engaged in action in the vicinity of Harbonnieres, France.

On 18th September 1918 Private Coyte was killed in action during an attack launched by the 13th Battalion on the German Lines south of the village of Le Verguier, France. He is buried at the nearby Jeancourt Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

Private B. Coyte's headstone at Jeancourt Communal Cemetery Extension, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson, 6/9/2014)

Private B. Coyte’s headstone at Jeancourt Communal Cemetery Extension, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson, 6/9/2014)

Private Coyte’s’s name is commemorated on panel 68 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Private Coyte’s name is also listed on Borenore District War Memorial, and Orange War Memorial.

John MARTIN

John MARTIN

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4541), John Martin was born at Melbourne, Victoria. He gave his age as 34 years 10 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 4 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 2 lbs., with a florid complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Roman Catholic. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 22nd October 1915 at Molong, and was attested by Captain Nicholas at Molong (8 miles from Molong East) on the 22nd October 1915.

After joining the Coo-ees at Molong, he completed the Coo-ee March, and went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

The address he gave on his initial application to enlist form at Molong on the 22nd October 1915 was Bowral, Southern Line, N.S.W. On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was C/o E. J. Arnold, St. John’s Road, Forest Lodge, Sydney, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as sister, Mrs. M. Martin, St. John’s Road, Forest Lodge, Sydney, N.S.W.

On 16th February, 1916 Private Martin departed Sydney on the HMAT Ballarat A70. On the voyage to Egypt the HMAT Ballarat A70 stopped at Ceylon where on 3rd of March 1916 Private Martin was charged with Being Absent Without Leave from 1700 on 7th March 1916 till 1900 on 7th March 1916, and also charged with Breaking Ranks. He was fined 1 pound.

The HMAT Ballarat A70 arrived in Egypt on 22nd March 1916.

On 1st April 1916 Private Martin was transferred to the 54th Battalion at Ferry Post, Egypt.

On 19th June 1916 Private Martin left Alexandria aboard the Transport HT Caledonian bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on the 29th June 1916.

Private Martin joined the 54th Battalion early in July 1916 when it was conducting training at Thiennes, France. On 7th July 1916 Private Martin was evacuated to the 12th Casualty Clearing Station suffering from Haemorrhoids. On 10th July he was placed aboard the 18th Ambulance Train bound for Calais, France. On 13th July 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Newhaven that departed for England and arrived at Dover later that day. Private Martin was then admitted to the General Military Hospital at Colchester, England.

As a result of being hospitalised with his ailment Private Martin was not present with the 54th Battalion when it was involved in the Battle of Fromelles later that month.

On 20th September 1916 Private Martin marched into the 14th Training Battalion at Larkhill, England. On 14th October 1916 Private Martin departed England bound for France, marching into the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples on 16th October 1916. On 30th October 1916 Private Martin departed the 5th Australian Division Base Depot to rejoin his unit.

On 2nd November 1916 Private Martin arrived at the 54th Battalion when it was in the trenches in the vicinity of Longueval, France.

On 14th December 1916 when the Battalion was resting at Montauban, France, after just coming out of the trenches, Private Martin was evacuated to a Field Ambulance suffering from Trench Feet. On 16th December 1916 he was admitted to the 11th Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France. On 17th December 1916 he was sent to Calais, France. On 17th December 1916 Private Martin boarded the Hospital Ship Carisbrooke Castle bound for England. On 18th December 1916 he was admitted to the 1st London General Hospital.

On 15th January 1917 Private Martin was discharged from Hospital and granted leave till 30th January 1917, when he marched into the 1st Convalescent Depot at Pernham Downs, England.

On 28th February 1917 Private Martin departed Folkestone, England, bound for France aboard the Transport Invicta. He arrived at the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France, on 1st March 1917.

On 21st March 1917 he left the 5th Australian Division Base Depot to rejoin his unit. On 23rd March 1917 Private Martin arrived at the 54th Battalion when it was engaged in consolidating work and resting in the vicinity of Longueval, France.

On 27th May 1917 the Battalion was resting at Beaulencourt, France where Private Martin was promoted to Corporal.

On 19th of July 1917 Corporal Martin was transferred to the 14th Training Battalion in England. He arrived in England on 24th of July 1917.

On the 5th October 1917 he attended the 37th Army course of P. & B. instruction at Tidworth and qualified as “fair”.

On 12th January 1918 in a letter to 14th Training Battalion he changed his next of kin from his sister to his new English wife Mrs Louisa Minnie Martin, whose address was 64 Bessborough Place, Bessborough Street, Vauxhall Bridge Road, London, S.W.  On 16th January 1918 he made a new will bequeathing his real and personal estate to his wife.

On 1st April 1918 Corporal Martin departed Dover for France arriving at the Number 1 Overflow camp at Beaumarais, France. On 4th April 1918 Corporal Martin left Beaumarais to rejoin the 54th Battalion. On 10th April 1918 he arrived at the Battalion when it was preparing to go into action in the vicinity of Aubigny, France.

On 24th April 1918 the 54th Battalion was engaged in action in the vicinity of Villers Bretonneux, France, when Corporal Martin received a gunshot wound to his chest. He was evacuated to the 15th Australian Field Ambulance, then on 25th April 1918 to the 61st Casualty Clearing Station, then onto the 10th General Hospital at Rouen, France.

On 3rd May 1918 he was sent to Hospital in England, arriving at the 5th Southern General Hospital at Portsmouth, England, on the 4th May 1918. On 15th May 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England. He was discharged from hospital on 17th May 1918 and went on leave, reporting back to the 4th Convalescent Depot at Hurdcott, England, on 31st May 1918.

On 19th July 1918 Corporal Martin marched into the overseas Training Brigade and on 15th August 1918 he departed Folkestone for France. On 16th August 1918 Corporal Martin arrived at the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve, France.

On 22nd August 1918 Corporal Martin rejoined the 54th Battalion whilst it was in reserve in the vicinity of Proyart, France.

On 1st September 1918 Corporal Martin was with the 54th Battalion when it was involved in the successful assault on Peronne, France. During this assault the 54th Battalion lost 27 men killed, 147 wounded and had 9 men missing. Corporal Martin was one of those killed in action.

Corporal Martin is buried in the Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension, Peronne, France.

John Martin's headstone at Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson, 6/9/2014)

John Martin’s headstone at Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension, France (Photograph: S. & H. Thompson, 6/9/2014)

Corporal Martin’s name is commemorated on panel 159 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

John Martin’s name is also recorded on the Coo-ee March Memorial Gateway at Molong as one of the five men who joined the Coo-ee March at Molong on 22nd October 1915.

Archibald MCINTYRE

Archibald MCINTYRE

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2708), Archibald McIntyre enlisted twice in the AIF. Archibald McIntyre was born at Glasgow, Scotland. On his first enlistment (during the Coo-ee March), he gave his age as 31 years and 6 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 2 inches tall, weight 9 stone 10 lbs., with a dark complexion, brown eyes, and dark hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service. He completed his medical on the 26th October 1915 at Blayney, and was attested by Captain Eade at Blayney on the 26th October 1915.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

Whilst at Liverpool Camp Private McIntyre went before a medical board on 17th November 1915 where he was deemed unfit for military service due to defective vision. He was discharged on the 29th November 1915.

In a letter dated 16th April 1916 Archibald McIntyre wrote “I was rejected for eyesight but as they have reduced the test I intend to give it another try”.[1]

On the 19th May 1916 Archibald McIntyre applied again to join the AIF. He attended the Royal Agricultural Showground in Sydney, and stated in this application that he had 35 days previous military service in the AIF, and was rejected on grounds of eyesight. He underwent a medical on the 19th May 1916 which he passed. He was attested on the 20th May 1916 at the Royal Agricultural Showground.

Private McIntyre went into camp and began training at Cootamundra on the 23rd May 1916, then to Goulburn on the 22nd June 1916. He remained at Goulburn till the 4th September 1916 when he was transferred to the 56th Battalion and went to Sydney being taken on strength of the 6th reinforcements for the Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Portland N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as father, William McIntyre, 161 Pollok Street, Glasgow, Scotland.

Private McIntyre departed Sydney on the HMAT A40 Ceramic on the 7th October 1916. He arrived in Plymouth, England, on the 21st November 1916. After further training in England he departed Folkestone, England, aboard the SS Princess Victoria for France on the 21st December 1916. He underwent further training in France at the 5th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples. He joined the 56th Battalion on 1st February 1917 whilst it was in reserve and providing fatigue parties at Bernafay south of Pozieres, France.

On the 22nd March 1917 the 56th Battalion was in reserve in the vicinity of Bancourt, France, when Private McIntyre was evacuated to hospital sick. On the 24th March 1917 he was diagnosed to be suffering from Bronchitis. On the 25th March at the 2nd/1st South Midland Casualty Clearing Station Private McIntyre was diagnosed with Cerebro Spinal Meningitis. He died the next day.

Private McIntyre was buried in the Puchevillers British Cemetery, France, on 26th March 1917.

Archibald McIntyre's headstone at Puchervillers British Cemetery, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson 5/9/2014)

Archibald McIntyre’s headstone at Puchevillers British Cemetery, France (Photograph: S & H Thompson 5/9/2014)

Private McIntyre’s name is commemorated on panel 162 on the Australian War Memorial First World War Roll of Honour.

Note: Archibald McIntyre’s father wrote on his Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour Circular that he came to Australia when he was 22, and that he ‘sailed round world once or twice as a sea apprentice in a sailing ship. Traded from Australia to New Zealand for a time. Joined in the Coo-ee March. Two brothers in British Army (one killed).’[2]

[1] McIntyre, Archibald. Letter to [A. H. Miller], 16th April 1916, Alex Halden (Joe) Miller papers mainly relating to the Gilgandra Coo-ee Recruitment March, New South Wales, 1912-1921, 1939, held at the Mitchell Library (State Library of N.S.W.)

[2] Archibald McIntyre 2708 Australian War Memorial Roll of Honour Circular, http://static.awm.gov.au/images/collection/pdf/RCDIG1068881–64-.PDF