George Allen LLOYD

George Allen LLOYD

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4828), George Allen Lloyd was born at Forbes, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 21 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer. His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 9 stone 13 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England. He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He completed medical on 15th October 1915 at Orange, and was attested at Orange on 18th  October 1915.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

‘G. A. Lloyd ’was named in newspaper reports as one of the men who was recruited by the local Recruiting Association to join the Coo-ees when they arrived in Orange on 24th October 1915.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 2nd February 1916 Private Llloyd was charged with using bad language on parade. He was fined 5 shillings.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was North Hill, Forbes, N.S.W. [3] His next of kin is listed as his father, G. A. Lloyd, North Hill, Forbes, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Lloyd departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, as part of the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion. He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Lloyd was transferred to the 5th Division Cyclist Company (along with fellow Coo-ees Private Richardson, Private Megarrity, and Private Spicer).

On 17th June 1916 Private Lloyd left Alexandria aboard the Transport Manitou bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 25th June 1916.

On 3rd December 1916 Private Llloyd was sent to the 1st New Zealand Field Ambulance sick with Influenza. He was transferred to the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station later that day. On 5th December 1916 he was placed aboard a hospital train and moved back to the 32nd Stationary Hospital at Wimereux, France, being admitted on 6th December 1916.

On 24th December 1916 he was transferred to the 1st Convalescent Depot at Boulogne. He was discharged on 2nd of January 1917 and sent to the Australian General Base Depot at Etaples, France.

He re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 17th January 1917.

On 23rd January 1917 Private Lloyd was sent to the 3rd New Zealand Field Ambulance sick with Influenza. On 26th January 1917 he was moved back to the 2nd New Zealand Division Rest Station. He was discharged and re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 18th February 1917.

On 18th May 1917 Private Lloyd was detached for duty with the 2nd ANZAC Anti-aircraft section. He re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion from detachment on 25th May 1917.

On 20th July Private Lloyd went on leave, returning to his unit on 1st August 1917.

On 3rd August 1917 Private Lloyd was sent sick to the New Zealand Stationary Hospital at Hazebrouck, France. On 9th August 1917 he was admitted to the 7th Canadian Stationary Hospital at St Omer, France, suffering from nervous indigestion. On 12th August 1917 he was transferred to the 7th Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, France. On 16th August 1917 he was transferred to the 10th Convalescent Depot.

He was discharged on 2nd October 1917 and sent to the Australian General Base Depot at Le Havre. He re-joined the 2nd Anzac Cyclist Battalion on 11th October 1917.

On 6th November 1917 Private Lloyd was sent to the Indian Cavalry Field Ambulance with a sprained left knee and a wound to the fifth finger on his right hand, caused by a fall from a cycle. He was moved back to the 59th Casualty Clearing Station later that day.

On 23rd November 1917 he was admitted to the 26th General Hospital. On 27th November 1917 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Stad Antwerpen for evacuation to England with synovitis of the left knee, and a wound to the right hand. He was admitted to the 16th Canadian General Hospital (Ontario Military Hospital), in England.

On 7th January 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England. He was discharged on 18th January 1918 and sent to the No.3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 15th February 1918 Private Lloyd was charged with being absent without leave from midnight on 7th February 1918 until 1740 on 13th February 1918. The charge was dismissed as Private Lloyd produced a Medical Certificate.

On 24th February 1918 Private Lloyd was admitted to the Brigade Hospital suffering Influenza. He was discharged on 23rd March 1918.

On 21st May 1918 Private Lloyd marched into the Overseas Training Brigade.

On 5th June 1918 he departed Southampton bound for France. He marched into the Australian General Base Depot at Le Harve on 6th June 1918.

He was taken on strength from 2nd Anzac Corps Cyclist Battalion ex hospital and ex Base Depot to the Australian Corps Cyclist Battalion on 10th June 1918.

On 10th November 1918 Private Lloyd went on leave to England. He re-joined the Cyclist Battalion on 8th December 1918.

On 26th March 1919 at Charleroi, Belgium, Private Lloyd was charged with gambling and being in possession of loaded firearms. He was awarded 7 days Field Punishment No.2 and fined 7 days pay.

On 13th April 1919 Private Lloyd marched into the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve, France, to commence his return to Australia.

He departed France on 18th April 1919. He arrived at Southampton, England, on 19th April 1919, and marched into the No. 2 Group.

On 29th May 1919 at Sutton Veny, England, Private Lloyd was charged with being absent without leave from 2359 on 16th May 1919 until 1600 on 23rd May 1919. He was fined 21 days pay.

On 5th June 1919 Private Lloyd departed Devonport, England, aboard the H.T. Mahia bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 20th July 1919.  He was discharged medically unfit on 13th September 1919.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, LLOYD GEORGE ALLEN

[2] THE RECRUITS. (1915, October 25). Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 – 1922), p. 4. Retrieved November 26, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117842599 ; “THE COO-EES.” (1915, October 23). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), p. 6. Retrieved January 1, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115269403

[3] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, George Allen Lloyd, 4828.

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