Albert DENZEL

Albert DENZEL (MM)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4765), Albert Denzel was born at North Parramatta, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 18 years and 5 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination form was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight 132 lbs., with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed to have 4 years universal military training [cadets] and was still serving.

He completed his medical examination on 11th November 1915 at Parramatta, and was attested by Lieutenant R. Howe at Parramatta (the day the Coo-ees marched from Parramatta to Ashfield).

A note from his mother Mrs Matilda Denzel in his file gave permission for her son to train in the Imperial Force.

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Wentworth Street, Parramatta, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs. M. Denzel, at the same address.[2]

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On 8th March 1916 Private Gooley departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, along with many of the other Coo-ees, with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion.

Troopship HMAT A15 Star of England. Australian War Memorial Collection AWM H17014.

He arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 19th April 1916 he was transferred to the 45th Battalion in Egypt.

On 2nd June 1916 Private Denzel left Alexandria aboard the transport Kinfauns Castle bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 8th June 1916.

Private Denzel served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France in July 1916, then through the battles around Pozieres and Mouquet Farm in August, September and October 1916.

On 13th January 1917 the 45th Battalion was in the front line in the vicinity of  Guedecourt, France, when Private Denzel was charged with neglecting to obey an order of a NCO.[3] He was awarded 28 days Field Punishment No. 2.

On 21st September 1917 Private Denzel went to England on leave. On 25th September 1917 he was admitted to hospital with influenza in Edinburgh, Scotland, while still on leave. He returned to the 45th Battalion in France after being discharged from hospital.

On 30th November 1917 Private Denzel was detached for duty with the 12th Australian Light Trench Mortar Battery. He re-joined the 45th Battalion on 27th December 1917 whilst it was training at Haut Allaines, France.[4]

On 19th August 1918 the 45th Battalion was in the front line in the vicinity of Lihons, France, when Private Denzel participated in an action for which he was later awarded the Military Medal.[5]

His recommendation for a Military Medal, dated 24th August 1918, is included in his service record, and reads:

‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty near Lihons S. of Villers-Bretonneux  on 19.8.18. at 8.30 p.m. The enemy attacked the Canadians on our right flank. This soldier was a member of a Lewis Gun team and after the No. 1 had been killed he took charge of the gun. In spite of a heavy M. G. and Art. barrage he daringly occupied a commanding position. Using his gun with remarkable skill and initiative he succeeded in enfilading the enemy’s right flank causing many casualties among the attacking enemy force. The promptness and fine fighting spirit shown by Private Denzel set a splendid example to the men about him.’[6]

On 7th September 1918 Private Denzel went on leave to England. He re-joined the 45th Battalion on 24th September 1918, which on that day moved from Assevillers to Pissy, France.[7]

On 29th December 1918 he was appointed as a temporary driver.

On 23rd February 1919 Temporary Driver Denzel left the 45th Battalion for the Australian Base Depot at Le Harve, to commence his return to Australia.

On 13th March 1919 he departed Le Harve, bound for England. He arrived at Weymouth on 14th March 1919, and marched into the No. 4 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.

On 12th April 1919 Temporary Driver Denzel was admitted to the 2nd Camp Hospital for observation. He was discharged on 14th April 1919.

Temporary Driver Denzel departed Devonport aboard the Transport China on 1st May 1919.

Notification of Private Denzel’s  Military Medal award was gazetted in Second Supplement No. 31338 to The London Gazette, 13th May 1919 (page 10585), and was also published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, No. 109, dated 15th September, 1919.[8]

He arrived in Sydney on 11th June 1919.

He was discharged Termination of Period of Enlistment on 26th July 1919.

 

[1] NAA B2455, DENZEL A

[2] Australia War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, Albert Denzel, HMAT Star of England A15, 8th March 1916.

[3] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/11 – January 1917.

[4] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/22– December 1917.

[5] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/30 – August 1918.

[6] NAA B2455, DENZEL A

[7] Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, AWM4 Subclass 23/62 – 45th Infantry Battalion, AWM4 23/62/31 – September 1918.

[8] NAA B2455, DENZEL A

2 responses to “Albert DENZEL

  1. As always, a well written account of a soldier’s service. Well done Helen!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s