Tag Archives: Katoomba recruits

Thomas Henry TURVEY

Thomas Henry TURVEY

Private T. H. Turvey, of Gilgandra "Coo-ees", awarded Military Medal (Newspaper unknown, 1917)

Private T. H. Turvey, of Gilgandra “Coo-ees”, awarded Military Medal (Newspaper unknown, 1917)

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4902A), Thomas Henry Turvey was born at Gulgong, N.S.W. [1]  He gave his age as 22 years and 9 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as laborer.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was height 5 feet 8 ½ inches tall, weight 10 stone 10 lbs., with a dark complexion, light blue eyes, and dark hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.  He completed his medical examination on 4th October 1915 at Gilgandra, and was attested by Captain Eade at Lawson on the 7th October 1915.

Thomas Turvey stated that he had joined the Coo-ees at Katoomba in a court case in December 1915, in which he was a witness.[2]  The Coo-ees had stayed overnight at Katoomba on 5th November 1915.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Gilgandra, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, T. [Thomas] Turvey, Gilgandra, N.S.W.

On 8th March 1916 Private Turvey, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

He was transferred to the 45th Battalion on 20th May 1916.

On 7th June 1916 Private Turvey left Alexandria aboard the transport Huntspill bound for France, arriving at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

On 19th July 1916 Private Turvey was taken on strength of the 45th Battalion.

Private Turvey served with the 45th Battalion through its first action at Fleurbaix, France, in July 1916, then the Battle of the Somme around Pozieres, Mouquet Farm and Flers, without injury or illness.

His service record states that he was allocated the letter “A” to his regimental number on 22nd February 1917 on account of duplication of numbers.

Private Turvey was serving with the 45th Battalion when it was in action around Guedecourt, France, where on 27th February 1917 he was recommended for, and subsequently awarded, the Military Medal for bravery in the field, for his action on the 22nd/23rd February 1917.  This award was published in the London Gazette Supplement no. 30036 on 26th April 1917, and promulgated in the Commonwealth Gazette No. 133 on 21st August 1917.[3]

The citation for the Military Medal reads: “For his gallant conduct and devotion to duty during an attack on a enemy trench near Guedecourt on the night of 22/23rd Febry. 1917 when as a runner he maintained communication overland under artillery and machine gun fire between the front line and Headquarters. His work in this respect was quite consistent with his previous fine record established for coolness and determination in the face of all obstacles”.[4]

On 7th June 1917 the 45th Battalion was involved in an attack at Messines Ridge when Private Turvey received a gunshot wound to the abdomen.  He was one of 352 members of the 45th Battalion wounded during the attack.  Another 100 were killed and 50 missing.   He was evacuated to the 77th Field Ambulance, then to the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station.  On 9th June 1917 he was admitted to the 2nd Australian General Hospital at Wimereux.

On 11th June 1917 Private Turvey was placed aboard the Hospital Ship St Patrick for evacuation to England, and he was admitted to Royal Herbert Hospital at Woolwich with a gunshot wound to his right side on the same day.

On 22nd June 1917 Private Turvey was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 13th July 1917 he was discharged from hospital, and sent to the No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 27th July 1917 Private Turvey commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.M.A.T. Demosthenes.

He arrived in Australia on 29th September 1917, and was discharged medically unfit on 1st November 1917.

 

[1] NAA: B2455, TURVEY THOMAS HENRY

[2] ‘Alleged Disloyal Conduct’, The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate, 3 December 1915, p. 4. Retrieved February 26, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77602826

[3] The London Gazette, 26 April 1917, Supplement 30036, p. 3948, https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30036/supplement/3948 ; Commonwealth Gazette, No. 133, 21st August 1917, p. 1786, https://www.legislation.gov.au/content/HistoricGazettes1917 (and copy in service record)

[4] Australian War Memorial. Recommendation for Military Medal, Thomas Henry Turvey, 27th February 1917, https://www.awm.gov.au/people/rolls/R1625170/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Graham WATSON

John Graham WATSON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4909), John Graham Watson was born at Katoomba, N.S.W.[1]  He gave his age as 25 years, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 9 ½ inches tall, weight 162 lbs., with a medium complexion, blue eyes, and medium hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had no previous military service.

He appears to have mistakenly been named as ‘W. Watson’ in The Blue Mountain Echo as one of ‘the lads who answered the call, and marched out with the Coo-ees’ at Katoomba.[2]

He was attested at Springwood by Lieutenant F. Middenway on 8th November 1915 (when the Coo-ees were at Springwood), but did not complete his medical examination until 15th November 1915 at Liverpool.

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Bent Street, Katoomba, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his sister, Miss E. [Elsie] A. Watson, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Watson, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

On 7th June 1916 Private Watson left Alexandria aboard the Transport Ionian bound for France, and he arrived at Marseilles on 14th June 1916.

Private Watson marched into the 13th Battalion on 19th August 1916 when it was resting and reorganising at Pernois, France.  (Fellow Coo-ee William Stirling Mason from Katoomba had joined the 13th Battalion in France on the same day).

A letter home from another Katoomba soldier, Reg. Duff, dated 15th September 1916, that was published in The Blue Mountain Echo, reported that ‘Snowy Mason and Jack Watson have joined the 13th Battalion’.[3]

On 10th October 1916 Private Watson was promoted to Lance Corporal in the field, in Belgium.

On 21st January 1917 he was promoted to Temporary Corporal.

On 4th February 1917 the 13th Battalion successfully attacked the German Front Line trenches near the village of Guedecourt, France.  During this attack T/Corporal Watson was wounded in action, receiving a gunshot wound to his right leg. (William Stirling Mason was also wounded in action with shrapnel wounds on the same day).  T/Corporal Watson was evacuated and admitted to the 10th General Hospital at Rouen, France, on 7th February 1917.  He also on this date reverted to the rank of Lance Corporal, on being wounded.

On 11th February 1917 Lance Corporal Watson was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Aberdonian for evacuation to England.  On 13th February 1917 he was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth.

On 2nd April 1917 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Dartford, England with a gunshot wound to his right foot.  He was discharged on 9th April 1917, and sent to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 3rd May 1917 Lance Corporal Watson was admitted sick to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England.  He was discharged on 21st June 1917, and returned to the Number 2 Command Depot.

On 29th of June 1917 Lance Corporal Watson was transferred to the Number 3 Command Depot at Hurdcott, England.  Soon after he was the sent to the Overseas Training Brigade at Perham Downs.

On 13th August 1917 he departed Southampton bound for France.  On 14th August 1917 he arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve.

On 16th of August 1917 Lance Corporal Watson was admitted to the 39th General Hospital sick.  He was discharged and sent back to the 4th Australian Division Base Depot on 24th August 1917.

On 1st September 1917 he marched into the 13th Battalion when it was resting and reorganising at Verte Rue in France.

On 24th October 1917 Lance Corporal Watson was with the 13th Battalion when it was preparing to move from Ypres to Rheninghelst in Belgium, when he was sent to the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance with gas poisoning, then moved back to the 17th Casualty Clearing Station.  On 26th October 1917 he was admitted to the 9th General Hospital at Rouen, France.  On 6th November 1917 he was placed aboard a hospital ship for evacuation to England.  On 7thth November 1917 he was admitted to the Winchester Military Hospital with severe gas poisoning.

On 7th February 1918 he was transferred to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England.

On 16th March 1918 Lance Corporal Watson departed England aboard the Transport Kanowna bound for Australia.

He arrived in Australia on 25th May 1918, and was discharged Medically Unfit on 26th July 1918.

[1] NAA: B2455, WATSON J G

[2] ‘March over the Mountains’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 12 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved September 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142

[3] ‘The Soldiers’ Mailbag’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 10 November 1916, p. 1. Retrieved February 22, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042760

 

William Stirling MASON

William Stirling MASON

Per his military service record (regimental no. 4839), William Stirling Mason was born at ‘Eketahana’ [i.e. Eketahuna], New Zealand.[1]  His middle name of “Stirling” is spelt “Sterling”on some sections of his service record, but it is spelt as “Stirling” in his signature.  He gave his age as 21 years and 8 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as labourer.  His description on his medical was height 5 feet 6 inches tall, weight 8 stone 12 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and light brown hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.  He claimed that he had 12 months service in the Senior Cadets in New Zealand and he had been rejected for the AIF in the past for chest measurement.

The Blue Mountain Echo named ‘W. Mason’ as one of ‘the lads who answered the call, and marched out with the Coo-ees’ at Katoomba.[2]

He was attested at Springwood on 9th November 1915, and completed his medical examination on 9th November 1915 at Penrith, N.S.W.  (The Coo-ees had travelled from Springwood to Penrith on 9th November 1915).

After completing the Co-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Waratah Street, Katoomba, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his father, W. [Walter] Mason, at the same address.

On 8th March 1916 Private Mason, along with many of the other Coo-ee,s departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England, and arrived in Egypt on 11th April 1916.

It is not recorded when Private Mason departed Egypt, but he ended up in the 4th Training battalion in England.

On 30th July 1916 Private Mason departed Rollerstone in England bound for France.  He marched into the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples on 1st August 1916.

He joined the 13th Battalion on 19th August 1916 when it was resting and reorganising at Pernois, France.

On 4th February 1917 the 13th Battalion successfully attacked the German Front Line trenches near the village of Guedecourt, France.  During this attack Private Mason was wounded in action. receiving multiple shrapnel wounds to his right arm.  He was evacuated and admitted to the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital at Boulogne, France on 7th February 1917.

On 9th of February 1917 Private Mason was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Princess Elizabeth in Boulogne Harbour for evacuation to England.

On 10th February 1917 he was admitted to the Norfolk War Hospital.

Private Mason was discharged on 5th March 1917, and granted leave to report to the Number 4 Command Depot at Wareham, England, on 21st March 1917.

On 3rd April 1917 Private Mason was admitted to the Military Hospital at Wareham with measles.

On 12th April 1917 he was moved to the 16th Field Ambulance at Woolwich, then was admitted to the Woolwich Military Hospital later that day.  He was discharged and sent back to the Number 4 Command Depot on 21st April 1917.

On 27th April 1917 Private Mason was transferred to the newly formed 63rd Battalion at Pernham Downs (which was later disbanded on 19th October 1917).

On 12th September 1917 Private Mason departed Southampton bound for France, to reinforce the 13th Battalion.  He arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve on 13th September 1917.

On 21st September 1917 he departed the 4th Australian Division Base depot to rejoin the 13th Battalion.  On 30th September 1917 he marched into the 13th Battalion, when it was in the Steenvoorde area in northern France.

Two weeks later, on 16th October 1917, Private Mason was with the 13th Battalion manning the support line in the vicinity of Zonnebeke, Belgium, when he was wounded in action by Mustard Gas.  He was sent to the 11th Australian Field Ambulance with a blistered head, then moved back to the 3rd Australian Clearing Station.  He was placed aboard the 26th Ambulance Train and on 19th October 1917 he was admitted to the 3rd Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France.

On 22nd October 1917 he was placed aboard Hospital Ship Grantully Castle for evacuation to England.  On 24th October 1917 he was admitted to the Queen Mary Military Hospital at Whalley in Lancashire.

On 16th November 1917 Private Mason was discharged from hospital, and granted leave to report to the Number 1 Command Depot at Sutton Veny on 30th November 1917.

On 2nd January 1918 Private Mason marched into the Overseas Training Brigade at Longbridge, England from Number 1 Command Depot.

On 23rd January 1918 Private Mason departed Southampton bound for France.  He arrived at the 4th Australian Division Base Depot at Le Harve on  24th January 1918.

On 26th January 1918 Private Mason departed the 4th Australian Division Base depot to rejoin the 13th Battalion.  On 30th January 1918 he marched into the Battalion when it was manning the front line in the vicinity of Hollebeke, Belgium.

On the 1st of March 1918 Private Mason was with the 13th Battalion being relieved by the 10th Battalion from the support lines when the enemy launched a trench raid. Private Mason’s company was caught in the enemy barrage and 5 men were killed, and 5 wounded, including Private Mason, who sustained a shrapnel wound to his forehead and another to his right hand.  Both were minor. He was sent to the 1st Australian Field Ambulance.  He was treated and rejoined the Battalion the next day.

On 13th of November 1918 Private Mason was granted leave from France to England until 28th November 1918.

While on leave in England, on 17th November 1918 was admitted to the 1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital at Harefield, England, suffering Bronchitis.  This was reported as ‘Influenza seriously ill’ on 20th November 1918.

Private Mason was discharged on 6th of December 1918 and granted leave to report back to the Hospital at Harefield on  11th December 1918.  He was discharged on 14th December 1918, and sent to the Number 2 Command Depot at Weymouth, England.

On 18th January 1919 Private Mason departed England aboard the H.M.A.T. Ulysses bound for Australia.  He arrived in Australia on 15th March 1919.

The Blue Mountain Echo reported that Private ‘Will Mason’, along with other returning local soldiers, was presented with a smoker’s outfit at a welcome home function held at the Katoomba Town Hall on 31st March 1919.[3]

Private Mason was discharged Medically Unfit on 1st May 1919.

[1] NAA: B2455, MASON WILLIAM STIRLING

[2] ‘March over the Mountains’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 12 November 1915, p. 2. Retrieved September 21, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142  [on page 3]

[3] ‘A Royal Welcome. Katoomba’s Heroes Received. A Memorable Evening’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 4 April 1919, p. 1. Retrieved February 19, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108245995

 

George Arthur FAWBERT

George Arthur FAWBERT

Per his military service record, George Athur Fawbert on his initial Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form gave his age as 28 years, his marital status as married, and his occupation as carpenter.[1] (There is no Attestation Paper in his military service record for this enlistment). His postal address on the Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form was Craigend Street, Leura. He passed the preliminary medical examination at Katoomba on 5th November 1915, and was provisionally accepted for enlistment in the Australian Imperial Force by Lieutenant F. Middenway at Katoomba on 6th November 1915. The Coo-ees held a recruiting meeting, and stayed overnight at Katoomba, on 5th November 1915.

‘G. A. Fawbert’ was listed in The Blue Mountain Echo as one of the men who ‘marched out’ with the Coo-ees at Katoomba.[2]

However, his Application to Enlist in the Australian Imperial Force form was amended on 12th January 1916 to being unfit for active service due to defective vision.

A separate military service record with regimental no. N43066, shows George Arthur Fawbert re-enlisted a few months later, where he was attested, and passed his certificate of medical examinatinon at Leura, on 3rd April 1916.[3]  On this Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Service Abroad, he stated that his place of birth was Bristol, England. He gave his age as 28 years, his marital status as married, and his occupation as carpenter (musician). His description on his certificate of medical examination was height 5 feet 4 inches tall, weight 10 stone 2 lbs., with a fair complexion, blue eyes “6/6 with glasses”, and fair hair. His religious denomination was Church of England.   He listed his next of kin as his wife, May Fawbert, Craigend Street, Leura. He did not mention his previous enlistment with the Coo-ees, stating he had no previous military experience.

His “Joined on” date was 26th June 1916, when he was sent to Depot Battalion at Bathurst Camp.

On 18th August 1916 Private Fawbert was transferred to the 54th Battalion.

On 14th November 1916 he was transferred to Liverpool Camp.

On 30th January 1917 Private Fawbert was discharged medically unfit with deficient vision.

The next day, George Arthur Fawbert re-enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force for home service with the Headquarters Band based at Liverpool Camp.[4] On this Attestation Paper of Persons Enlisted for Home Service, he stated he was born in the Parish of Katoomba in or near the town of Leura. He gave his age as 28 years 10 months, his marital status as married, and his occupation at music teacher.  He listed his next of kin as his wife, May Fawbert, Leura. He stated he has ten months previous experience in the A.I.F. and was discharged medically unfit. His certificate of medical examination on 31st January 1917 passed him “fit for Band”.  He was attested at Liverpool on 31st January 1917.

On 6th May 1918 Bandsman Fawbert was charged at the Liverpool Camp with disobedience of orders, by leaving an instrument in a hut not under cover, and not folding blankets before leaving hut, on 2nd May 1918. He was severely reprimanded.

He served with the Headquarters Band at Liverpool until he was discharged on 18th December 1918 Termination of Period of Enlistment.

[1] NAA: MT1486/1, FAWBERT/GEORGE ARTHUR

[2] ‘March o’er the Mountains. Gilgandra to the Sea. “Coo-ees En Route’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 12 November 1915, p. 3. Retrieved January 8, 2017, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142

[3] NAA: B2455, FAWBERT G A [Note incorrectly indexed under George Alfred Fawbert]

[4] NAA: MT1486/1, FAWBERT/GEORGE ARTHUR

Ronald Hector PERKINS

Ronald Hector PERKINS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2472), Ronald Hector Perkins was born at Katoomba, N.S.W. He gave his age as 21 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as carrier’s employee. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight approximately 180 lbs., with a fresh complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Congregational. He claimed that he had no previous military service ‘excepting compulsory training’. He completed his medical on the 5th November 1915 at Katoomba, and was attested at Katoomba by Lieutenant F. Middenway on the same day.

He was named in The Blue Mountain Echo as one of the recruits who joined the Coo-ees at Katoomba.[1]

After completing the march he went to Menangle Park Camp as reinforcement for the 6th Light Horse Regiment.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Bent Street, Katoomba, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs Fanny Perkins, at the same address.

On 26th April 1916 Trooper Perkins departed Sydney on the HMAT Port Macquarie A39.

After arriving at Suez in Egypt, on 21st June 1916 Trooper Perkins was taken on strength with the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Te-el-Kebir.

On 5th July 1916 Trooper Perkins transferred to the 1st Light Horse Regiment at Romani in Palestine.

Photograph of ‘Horse and tent lines of the 1st Australian Light Horse Regiment’, Romani Area, ca. August 1916. Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. P00153.020

Photograph of ‘Horse and tent lines of the 1st Australian Light Horse Regiment’, Romani Area, ca. August 1916. Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. P00153.020

The 1st Light Horse Regiment participated in the Battle of Romani 3-5th August 1916.[2]

On 6th August 1916 Trooper Perkins was admitted to the 1st Australian Stationary Hospital at Ismallia, Egypt, with an injury to his left shoulder. On 9th August 1916 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian General Hospital at Abbassia, Egypt. On 5th of September 1916 he was transferred to the British Red Cross Convalescent Hospital at Montazah, Egypt. He was discharged to duty on 18th September 1916.

He was taken on strength with the 1st Light Horse Regiment from the 1st Light Horse Training Regiment at Moascar, Egypt, on 13th October 1916.

On 2nd August 1917 Trooper Perkins was appointed as a temporary Driver.

On 6th September 1917 Driver Perkins was sent to a rest camp at Port Said, Egypt. He rejoined the 1st Light Horse Regiment on 16th September 1917.

On 16th March 1918 Driver Perkins’ rank status was formally changed to Driver.

On 15th May 1918 Driver Perkins was charged with when on active service on 3rd May 1918 being out of bounds in Jerusalem without a pass. He was fined one days pay.

On 16th June 1918 Driver Perkins was charged with on the 14th of June 1918 polluting drink ration by washing a horse within two yards of a stream, refusing to give his name and number to a member of the Military Police, and failing to produce an identity disc. He was fined two days pay.

On 27th September 1918 Driver Perkins was sent to hospital sick with malaria. On 30th September 1918 he was moved to the 66th Casualty Clearing Station. On 3rd October 1918 he was sent to the 26th Casualty Clearing Station, then admitted to the 47th Stationary Hospital at Gaza, Palestine later that day.

On 5th October 1918 he was transferred to the 44th Stationary Hospital. On 13th October 1918 he was transferred to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Port Said, Egypt.

He was discharged on 8th November 1918 and sent to a Rest Camp at Port Said, Egypt.

On 10th November 1918 Driver Perkins was granted 14 days leave in Cairo, Egypt. He returned from leave on 24th November 1918, and rejoined the 1st Light Horse Regiment at Moascar, Egypt, on 29th November 1918.

On 13th March 1919 Driver Perkins embarked from Kantara, Egypt, and commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.T. Ulimaroa. He arrived in Australia on 24th April 1919.

His parents invited about 100 guests to a function held at the Masonic Hall in Katoomba on Wednesday evening 30th April 1919 to welcome home their sons ‘Harold and Ron Perkins back from the front’, and a ‘pleasant evening was spend with music and dancing’.[3]

He was discharged from the A.I.F. medically unfit on 23rd June 1919.

[1] ‘March o’er the Mountains’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 12 November 1915, pp. 2-3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142

[2] AWM4 Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, Item no. 10/6/16, 1st Australian Light Horse Regiment, August 1916, accessed 3 April 2016, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/RCDIG1011913/

 [3] ‘Welcome back’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 2 May 1919 , p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108252021