Ronald Hector PERKINS

Ronald Hector PERKINS

Per his military service record (regimental no. 2472), Ronald Hector Perkins was born at Katoomba, N.S.W. He gave his age as 21 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as carrier’s employee. His description on his medical was height 5 feet 7 inches tall, weight approximately 180 lbs., with a fresh complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. His religious denomination was Congregational. He claimed that he had no previous military service ‘excepting compulsory training’. He completed his medical on the 5th November 1915 at Katoomba, and was attested at Katoomba by Lieutenant F. Middenway on the same day.

He was named in The Blue Mountain Echo as one of the recruits who joined the Coo-ees at Katoomba.[1]

After completing the march he went to Menangle Park Camp as reinforcement for the 6th Light Horse Regiment.

On his embarkation roll his address at time of enrolment was Bent Street, Katoomba, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as his mother, Mrs Fanny Perkins, at the same address.

On 26th April 1916 Trooper Perkins departed Sydney on the HMAT Port Macquarie A39.

After arriving at Suez in Egypt, on 21st June 1916 Trooper Perkins was taken on strength with the 2nd Light Horse Training Regiment at Te-el-Kebir.

On 5th July 1916 Trooper Perkins transferred to the 1st Light Horse Regiment at Romani in Palestine.

Photograph of ‘Horse and tent lines of the 1st Australian Light Horse Regiment’, Romani Area, ca. August 1916. Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. P00153.020

Photograph of ‘Horse and tent lines of the 1st Australian Light Horse Regiment’, Romani Area, ca. August 1916. Part of the Australian War Memorial Collection. P00153.020

The 1st Light Horse Regiment participated in the Battle of Romani 3-5th August 1916.[2]

On 6th August 1916 Trooper Perkins was admitted to the 1st Australian Stationary Hospital at Ismallia, Egypt, with an injury to his left shoulder. On 9th August 1916 he was transferred to the 3rd Australian General Hospital at Abbassia, Egypt. On 5th of September 1916 he was transferred to the British Red Cross Convalescent Hospital at Montazah, Egypt. He was discharged to duty on 18th September 1916.

He was taken on strength with the 1st Light Horse Regiment from the 1st Light Horse Training Regiment at Moascar, Egypt, on 13th October 1916.

On 2nd August 1917 Trooper Perkins was appointed as a temporary Driver.

On 6th September 1917 Driver Perkins was sent to a rest camp at Port Said, Egypt. He rejoined the 1st Light Horse Regiment on 16th September 1917.

On 16th March 1918 Driver Perkins’ rank status was formally changed to Driver.

On 15th May 1918 Driver Perkins was charged with when on active service on 3rd May 1918 being out of bounds in Jerusalem without a pass. He was fined one days pay.

On 16th June 1918 Driver Perkins was charged with on the 14th of June 1918 polluting drink ration by washing a horse within two yards of a stream, refusing to give his name and number to a member of the Military Police, and failing to produce an identity disc. He was fined two days pay.

On 27th September 1918 Driver Perkins was sent to hospital sick with malaria. On 30th September 1918 he was moved to the 66th Casualty Clearing Station. On 3rd October 1918 he was sent to the 26th Casualty Clearing Station, then admitted to the 47th Stationary Hospital at Gaza, Palestine later that day.

On 5th October 1918 he was transferred to the 44th Stationary Hospital. On 13th October 1918 he was transferred to the 14th Australian General Hospital at Port Said, Egypt.

He was discharged on 8th November 1918 and sent to a Rest Camp at Port Said, Egypt.

On 10th November 1918 Driver Perkins was granted 14 days leave in Cairo, Egypt. He returned from leave on 24th November 1918, and rejoined the 1st Light Horse Regiment at Moascar, Egypt, on 29th November 1918.

On 13th March 1919 Driver Perkins embarked from Kantara, Egypt, and commenced his return to Australia aboard the H.T. Ulimaroa. He arrived in Australia on 24th April 1919.

His parents invited about 100 guests to a function held at the Masonic Hall in Katoomba on Wednesday evening 30th April 1919 to welcome home their sons ‘Harold and Ron Perkins back from the front’, and a ‘pleasant evening was spend with music and dancing’.[3]

He was discharged from the A.I.F. medically unfit on 23rd June 1919.

[1] ‘March o’er the Mountains’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 12 November 1915, pp. 2-3, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108042142

[2] AWM4 Australian Imperial Force unit war diaries, 1914-18 War, Item no. 10/6/16, 1st Australian Light Horse Regiment, August 1916, accessed 3 April 2016, https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/RCDIG1011913/

 [3] ‘Welcome back’, The Blue Mountain Echo, 2 May 1919 , p. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108252021

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s