George EAVERS

George EAVERS

Per his initial military service record (regimental no. 4768), George Eavers was born at Manchester, Lancashire, England.[1] He gave his age as 27 years and 4 months, his marital status as single, and his occupation as barman.  His description on his Certificate of Medical Examination was 5 feet 3 ½ inches tall, weight 9 stone, with a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair.  His religious denomination was Roman Catholic.   He claimed to have no previous military service.

George Eavers was named in the National Advocate as one of seven recruits who had volunteered to join the Coo-ees at a recruiting rally held at the Soldiers’ Monument in Bathurst on the evening of 22nd October 1915.[2]

He was attested by Captain A. C. Eade at Bathurst on 28th October 1915 (when the Coo-ees were at Bathurst).

After completing the Coo-ee March he went to Liverpool Camp as reinforcement for the 13th Battalion.

He completed his medical examination at Liverpool on 13th November 1915.

On 21st January 1916 Private Eavers was charged with being absent without leave from 6th to the 8th January 1916. He was fined 10 shillings.

On 7th February 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave from 1st to the 7th February 1916. He was fined 30 shillings.

Listed under “George Eayers” on his embarkation roll, his address at time of enrolment was Cosmopolitan Hotel, Bathurst, N.S.W., and his next of kin is listed as friend, B Howe, at the same address.[3]

On 8th March 1916 Private Eavers, along with many of the other Coo-ees, departed Sydney on the HMAT A15 Star of England with the 15th reinforcements for the 13th Battalion, and arrived in Egypt on the 11th April 1916.

On 16th April 1916 Private Eavers was transferred to the 4th Pioneer Battalion at Tel-el-Kebir.

On 2nd May 1916 he was charged with being absent without leave from 1600 on 29th April 1916 till 0600 on 2nd May 1916. He was awarded 4 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 4 days pay.

On 4th June 1916 Private Eavers left Alexandria aboard the Transport Scotian bound for France.  He arrived at Marseilles on 11th June 1916.

Two and half months later, on 30th August 1916 Private Eavers reported sick with an abscess on his right groin. On 1st September 1916 he was sent to the 3rd Stationary Hospital at Rouen, France. On 3rd September 1916 he was sent to the 6th General Hospital at Rouen.

On 15th September 1916 he was placed aboard the Hospital Ship Asturias at Le Harve, France, for evacuation to England. Later that day he was admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth with an abcess on both groins.

On 6th November 1916 Private Eavers was discharged from hospital, and granted leave to report to the No. 1 Command Depot at Perham Downs, England, on 21st November 1916.

On 30th November 1916 Private Eavers was admitted to the Parkhouse Military Hospital sick.  He was discharged on 16th February 1917.

On 24th February 1917 Private Eavers was admitted sick to the 1st Australian Dermatological Hospital at Bulford, England. He was discharged on 19th May 1917.

On 29th May 1917 Private Eavers was charged with being absent without leave from 3.30 pm on 19th May 1917 till 9.15 pm on 24th May 1917. He was sentenced to 3 days Field Punishment No. 2 and fined 13 days pay.

On 1st June 1917 Private Eavers was charged with being absent without leave from 10 pm on 30th May 1917 till 10.30 pm on 31st May 1917. He was sentenced to 48 hours detention and fined 4 days pay.

On 27th June 1917 Private Eavers was transferred to the Pioneer Training Battalion at Fovant, England.

Private Eavers commenced his return to Australia on 7th July 1918 aboard the H.M.A.T. Essex.

He arrived in Australia on 1st September 1918.

He was discharged medically unfit on 19th October 1918.

 

[1] NAA B2455, EAVERS G

[2] Recruiting Rally (1915, October 23). National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved January 28, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158152992

[3] Australian War Memorial. First World War Embarkation Roll, George Eayers [sic], 4768.

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